“Caliph Stork” and Other Fairy Tales by Wilhelm Hauff (1826)

(actualisé le ) by Wilhelm Hauff

Wilhelm Hauff, a rising star of the rich "Biedermeier" period of German literature in the early 19th century, was able to publish outstanding collections of fairy tales that he called Almanacs in each of his last three years before his tragic death by typhoid fever in 1827 at the age of 24.

This is his Almanac of 1826, featuring his celebrated story about a Caliph and his Vizier who were transformed into storks by a magician, at their request, in order to be able to understand the language of birds and animals, but then forgot the magic word that would bring them back to human form because they had started laughing – contrary to the magician’s instructions – when they realized what nonsense the various birds and animals were saying to each other.

These charming tales in an oriental setting were translated by G. P. Quackenbos [1] for an American edition published in New York in 1855 [2].


An e-book, with the original text in an annex, is available for downloading below.

The original text can also be seen here.


Wilhelm Hauff (1802-1827)


THE FAIRY-TALE ALMANAC OF 1826

A FAIRY-TALE
THE CARAVAN
THE STORY OF CALIPH STORK
THE STORY OF THE SPECTRE SHIP
THE STORY OF THE HEWN-OFF HAND
FATIMA’S DELIVERANCE
THE STORY OF LITTLE MUCK
THE STORY OF THE FALSE PRINCE


A FAIRY-TALE

IN a beautiful distant kingdom, of which there is a saying, that the sun on its everlasting green gardens never goes down, ruled, from the beginning of time even to the present day, Queen Phantasie. With full hands, she used to distribute for many hundred years, the abundance of her blessings among her subjects, and was beloved and respected by all who knew her. The heart of the Queen, however, was too great to allow her to stop at her own land with her charities; she herself, in the royal attire of her everlasting youth and beauty, descended upon the earth; for she had heard that there men lived, who passed their lives in sorrowful seriousness, in the midst of care and toil. Unto these she had sent the finest gifts out of her kingdom, and ever since the beauteous Queen came through the fields of earth, men were merry at their labor, and happy in their seriousness.
Her children, moreover, not less fair and lovely than their royal mother, she had sent forth to bring happiness to men. One day Märchen [3], the eldest daughter of the Queen, came back in haste from the earth. The mother observed that Märchen was sorrowful; yes, at times it would seem to her as if her eyes would be consumed by weeping.
“What is the matter with thee, beloved Märchen?” said the Queen to her. “Ever since thy journey, thou art so sorrowful and dejected; wilt thou not confide to thy mother what ails thee?”
“Ah! dear mother,” answered Märchen, “I would have kept silence, had I not known that my sorrow is thine also.”
“Speak, my daughter!” entreated the fair Queen. “Grief is a stone, which presses down him who bears it alone, but two draw it lightly out of the way.”
“Thou wishest it,” rejoined Märchen, “so listen. Thou knowest how gladly I associate with men, how cheerfully I sit down before the huts of the poor, to while away a little hour for them after their labor; formerly, when I came, they used to ask me kindly for my hand to salute, and looked upon me afterwards, when I went away, smiling and contented; but in these days, it is so no longer!”
“Poor Märchen!” said the Queen as she caressed her cheek, which was wet with a tear. “But, perhaps, thou only fanciest all this.”
“Believe me, I feel it but too well,” rejoined Märchen; “they love me no more. Wherever I go, cold looks meet me; nowhere am I any more gladly seen; even the children, who ever loved me so well, laugh at me, and slyly turn their backs upon me.”
The Queen leaned her forehead on her hand, and was silent in reflection. “And how, then, Märchen,” she asked, “should it happen that the people there below have become so changed?”
“See, O Queen Phantasie! men have stationed vigilant watchmen, who inspect and examine all that comes from thy kingdom, with sharp eyes. If one should arrive who is not according to their mind, they raise a loud cry, and put him to death, or else so slander him to men, who believe their every word, that one finds no longer any love, any little ray of confidence. Ah! how fortunate are my brothers, the Dreams! they leap merrily and lightly down upon the earth, care nothing for those artful men, seek the slumbering, and weave and paint for them, what makes happy the heart, and brightens the eye with joy.”
“Thy brothers are light-footed,” said the Queen, “and thou, my darling, hast no reason for envying them. Besides, I know these border-watchmen well; men are not so wrong in sending them out; there came so many boastful fellows, who acted as if they had come straight from my kingdom, and yet they had, at best, only looked down upon us from some mountain.”
“But why did they make me, thine own daughter, suffer for this?” wept forth Märchen. “Ah, if thou knewest how they have acted towards me! They called me an old maid, and threatened the next time not to admit me!”
“How, my daughter?—not to admit thee more?” asked the Queen, as anger heightened the color on her cheeks. “But already I see whence this comes; that wicked cousin has slandered us!”
“Fashion? Impossible!” exclaimed Märchen; “she always used to act so friendly towards us.”
“Oh, I know her, the false one!” answered the Queen. “But try it again in spite of her, my daughter: whoever wishes to do good, must not rest.”
“Ah, mother! suppose, then, they send me back again, or slander me so that men let me stay in a corner, disregarded, or alone and slighted!”
“If the old, deluded by Fashion, value thee at nothing, then turn thee to the young; truly they are my little favorites. I send to them my loveliest pictures through thy brothers, the Dreams; yes, already I have often hovered over them in person, caressed and kissed them, and played fine games with them. They, also, know me well, though not by name; for I have often observed how in the night they laugh at my stars, and in the morning, when my shining fleeces play over the heavens, how they clap their hands for joy. Moreover, when they grow larger, they love me still; then I help the charming maids to weave variegated garlands, and the wild boys to become still, while I seat myself near them, on the lofty summit of a cliff, steep lofty cities and brilliant palaces in the mist-world of the blue mountains in the distance, and, on the red-tinged clouds of evening, paint brave troops of horsemen, and strange pilgrim processions.”
“Oh, the dear children!” exclaimed Märchen, deeply affected. “Yes—be it so! with them I will make one more trial.”
“Yes, my good child,” answered the Queen; “go unto them; but I will attire thee in fine style, that thou mayest please the little ones, and that the old may not drive thee away. See! the dress of an Almanac will I give thee.”
“An Almanac, mother? Ah!—I will be ashamed to parade, in such a way, before the people.”
The Queen gave the signal, and the attendants brought in the rich dress of an Almanac. It was inwrought with brilliant colors, and beautiful figures. The waiting-maids plaited the long hair of the fair girl, bound golden sandals on her feet, and arrayed her in the robe.
The modest Märchen dared not look up; her mother, however, beheld her with satisfaction, and clasped her in her arms. “Go forth!” said she unto the little one; “my blessing be with thee. If they despise and scorn thee, turn quickly unto me; perhaps later generations, more true to nature, may again incline to thee their hearts.”
Thus spoke Queen Phantasie, while Märchen went down upon the earth. With beating heart she approached the city, in which the cunning watchmen dwelt: she dropped her head towards the earth, wrapped her fine robe closely around her, and with trembling step drew near unto the gate.
“Hold!” exclaimed a deep, rough voice. “Look out, there! Here comes a new Almanac!”
Märchen trembled as she heard this; many old men, with gloomy countenances, rushed forth; they had sharp quills in their fists, and held them towards Märchen. One of the multitude strode up to her, and seized her with rough hand by the chin. “Just lift up your head, Mr. Almanac,” he cried, “that one may see in your eyes whether you be right or not.”
Blushing, Märchen lifted her little head quite up, and raised her dark eye.
“Märchen!” exclaimed the watchmen, laughing boisterously. “Märchen! That we should have had any doubt as to who was here! How come you, now, by this dress?”
“Mother put it on me,” answered Märchen.
“So! she wishes to smuggle you past us! Not this time! Out of the way; see that you be gone!” exclaimed the watchmen among themselves, lifting up their sharp quills.
“But, indeed, I will go only to the children,” entreated Märchen; “this, surely, you will grant to me.”
“Stay there not, already, enough of these menials in the land around?” exclaimed one of the watchmen. “They only prattle nonsense to our children.”
“Let us see what she knows this time,” said another.
“Well then,” cried they, “tell us what you know; but make haste, for we have not much time for you.”
Märchen stretched forth her hand, and described with the forefinger, various figures in the air. Thereupon they saw confused images move slowly across it;—caravans, fine horses, riders gayly attired, numerous tents upon the sand of the desert; birds, and ships upon the stormy seas; silent forests, and populous places, and highways; battles, and peaceful wandering tribes—all hovered, a motley crowd, in animated pictures, over before them.
Märchen, in the eagerness with which she had caused the figures to rise forth, had not observed that the watchmen of the gate had one by one fallen asleep. Just as she was about to describe new lines, a friendly man came up to her, and seized her hand. “Look here, good Märchen,” said he, as he pointed to the sleepers; “for these thy varied creations are as nothing; slip nimbly through the door; they will not suspect that thou art in the land, and thou canst quietly and unobserved pursue thy way. I will lead thee unto my children; in my house will give thee a peaceful, friendly home; there thou mayest remain and live by thyself; whenever my sons and daughters shall have learned their lessons well, they shall be permitted to run to thee with their plays, and attend to thee. Dost thou agree?”
“Oh! how gladly will I follow thee unto thy dear children! how diligently will I endeavor to make, at times, for them, a happy little hour!”
The good man nodded to her cordially, and assisted her to step over the feet of the sleeping men. Märchen, when she had got safely across, looked around smilingly, and then slipped quickly through the gate.


THE CARAVAN

Once upon a time a great caravan was travelling through the desert. On the vast plain, where there’s nothing but sand and sky, the bells of the camels and the silver wheels of the horses could be heard in the distance, a dense cloud of dust preceding them announced their proximity, and when a breeze parted the cloud, glittering weapons and brightly shining robes dazzled the eye. That’s how the caravan presented itself to a man who rode towards it from the side. He was riding a beautiful Arabian steed draped with a tiger-skin, silver bells hung from the deep-red belting and a beautiful plume of heron feathers blew on the horse’s head. The rider looked stately, and his suit matched the splendour of his steed: a white turban richly embroidered with gold covered his head; his coat and wide leggings were of burning red, a curved sword with a rich hilt was at his side. He had the turban pressed deep into his face; that and the black eyes that flashed out from under bushy brows, the long beard that hung down under the curved nose, gave him a wild, bold appearance.
When the rider was within fifty paces of the caravan’s advance he spurred his horse and in a few moments was at the head of the procession. It was such an unusual event to see a single rider crossing the desert that the guards of the caravan, fearing an ambush, pointed their lances towards him.
"What do you want?" cried the horseman, seeing himself so warily received, "do you think a single man will attack your caravan?"
Ashamed, the guards swung up their lances again, but their leader rode up to the stranger and asked him what he wanted.
"Who’s the master of the caravan?" asked the rider.
"It does not belong to a gentleman," replied the man who was asked, "but there are several merchants who are going from Mecca to their homeland and whom we escort through the desert, because all kinds of riffraff often trouble the travellers."
"So lead me to the merchants," the stranger asked.
"That cannot be done now," replied the guide, "because we must go on without stopping, and the merchants are at least a quarter of an hour farther back; but if you wish to ride on with me until we encamp to take a midday rest, I will grant your wish."
The stranger said nothing; he pulled out a long pipe that he had tied to the saddle and began to smoke in large puffs as he rode on beside the leader of the guards, who didn’t know what to make of the stranger; he didn’t dare to ask him his name, and no matter how artificially he tried to start a conversation the stranger only ever answered with a short "Yes, yes!" to the words: "You smoke good tobacco there!" or: "Your black horse has a good pace!"
At last they had arrived at the place where they were going to take a midday rest. The leader had posted his men as guards; he himself stopped with the stranger to let the caravan approach. Thirty camels, heavily laden, passed by led by armed guides. After them, on fine horses, came the five merchants to whom the caravan belonged. They were mostly men of advanced age, looking serious and sedate, but one seemed much younger than the others, as well as more cheerful and lively. A large number of camels and pack horses completed the procession.
Tents had been pitched and the camels and horses were placed all around. In the middle was a large tent made of blue silk. The leader of the guards led the stranger there. When they had stepped through the curtain of the tent they saw the five merchants sitting on gold-knitted cushions; black slaves handed them food and drink. "Whom have you brought us?" the young merchant called to the leader.
Before the guide could answer the stranger spoke: "My name is Selim Baruch and I am from Baghdad; I was caught by a band of robbers on a journey to Mecca and I secretly freed myself from captivity three days ago. The great Prophet made me hear the bells of your caravan afar off, and so I arrived at your house. Allow me to travel in your company! You will not give your protection to any unworthy person, and if you come to Baghdad, I shall reward your kindness abundantly, for I am the nephew of the Grand Vizier."
The oldest of the merchants took the floor: "Selim Baruch," he said, "be welcome in our shade. It is our pleasure to be with you; but above all, sit down and eat and drink with us."
Selim Baruch sat down with the merchants and ate and drank with them. After the meal, the slaves cleared away the dishes and brought long pipes and Turkish sherbet. The merchants sat in silence for a long time, blowing bluish clouds of smoke in front of them and watching them curl and twist and finally disappear into the air. The young merchant finally broke the silence: "We’ve been sitting like this for three days," he said, "on horseback and at the table, without doing anything to pass the time. I’m terribly bored, for I’m used to seeing dancers or hearing singing and music after the table. Do you know nothing, my friends, to pass the time?"
The four older merchants smoked away and seemed to be thinking seriously, but the stranger spoke: "If I may, I want to make a suggestion to you. I mean, at each campsite one of us could tell the others something. That could already pass the time."
"Selim Baruch, you have spoken true," said Achmet, the oldest of the merchants, "let us accept the proposal."
"I’m glad if the proposal pleases you," said Selim, "but so that you may see that I ask nothing unreasonable, I’ll make a start."
Amused, the five merchants moved closer together and let the stranger sit in their midst. The slaves refilled the mugs, refilled their masters’ pipes and brought glowing coals to light them. Selim, however, refreshed his voice with a good draught of sherbet, brushed away his long beard over his mouth and spoke: So hear: The Story of the Caliph Stork”

When Selim Baruch had finished his story, the merchants were very pleased with it. "Truly, the afternoon has passed without us noticing how!" said one of them, pulling back the blanket of the tent. "The evening wind is blowing cool, and we could still cover a good distance." His companions agreed, the tents were taken down, and the caravan set off in the same order in which it had started.
They rode almost the whole night through, for it was sultry during the day, but the night was refreshing and bright as stars. They finally arrived at a comfortable campsite, pitched their tents and lay down to rest. But the merchants took care of the stranger as if he were their most valued guest. One gave him cushions, another blankets, a third gave him slaves, in short, he was served as well as if he were at home. The hotter hours of the day had already come up when they rose again, and they unanimously decided to wait there for the evening. After they had eaten together they moved closer together again, and the young merchant turned to the eldest and said: "Selim Baruch gave us an amusing afternoon yesterday, how would it be, Achmet, if you also told us something, be it from your long life, that probably has many adventures to show, or be it a pretty fairy tale? Achmet was silent for a while, as if in doubt as to whether he should say this or that; at last he began to speak:
"Dear friends! You have proved yourselves faithful companions on this voyage of ours, and Selim also deserves my trust; so I want to tell you something from my life that I usually don’t like to tell everyone: The Story of the Spectre Ship

The journey of the caravan continued the next day without hindrance, and when they had rested in the camp-place, Selim the stranger began to speak thus to Muley, the youngest of the merchants:
"You may be the youngest of us, but you’re always cheerful and know some amusing story for us. Serve it up, that it may refresh us after the heat of the day!”
"I would like to tell you something that might amuse you," Muley replied, "but modesty in all things befits youth; that’s why my older travelling companions must take precedence. Zaleukos is always so serious and secretive, shouldn’t he tell us what made his life so serious? Perhaps so that we may ease his grief, if he has any; for gladly do we serve our brother, though he be of another faith."
The man called was a Greek merchant, a man in his middle years, handsome and strong, but very serious. Although he was a non-believer (not a Muslim), his travelling companions loved him, for he had instilled respect and confidence in them through his whole being. By the way, he had only one hand, and some of his companions suspected that perhaps this loss had made him so serious.
Zaleukos answered Muley’s trustful question: "I am very honoured by your confidence; I have no sorrows, at least none from which you could help me even with the best will in the world. But because Muley seems to reproach me for my seriousness, I’ll tell you some things that shall justify me when I am more serious than other people. You see that I’ve lost my left hand. I wasn’t born without it, but lost it in the most terrible days of my life. Whether I am to blame for that, whether I am wrong to be more serious than my situation implies since those days, you may judge when you have heard: The Story of the Hewn-off Hand

Zaleukos, the Greek merchant, finished his story. The others had listened to him with great participation, especially the stranger who seemed to be very moved by it; he had sighed deeply a few times, and it even seemed to Muley that he had tears in his eyes at one point. They talked about this story for a long time.
"And don’t you hate the stranger who so rudely deprived you of such a noble limb of your body, who put your life in danger?" asked the stranger.
"True, there were hours in former times," answered the Greek, "when my heart accused him before God that he had brought this grief upon me and poisoned my life; but I found comfort in the faith of my fathers, and that commands me to love my enemies; also he’s probably more unhappy than I am."
"You’re a noble man!" the stranger exclaimed and, moved, squeezed the Greek’s hand.
But the leader of the guards interrupted their conversation. He entered the tent with a worried expression and reported that they shouldn’t leave themselves to rest, for this was the place where the caravans were usually attacked, and his guards also thought they had seen several horsemen in the distance.
The merchants were greatly dismayed at this news; but Selim, the stranger, wondered at their dismay, and thought that they were so well esteemed that they needn’t fear a troop of marauding Arabs.
"Yes, sir," replied the leader of the guards. "If it were only such riffraff, one could rest without worrying; but for some time now the terrible Orbasan has been showing himself again, and it is necessary to be on one’s guard."
The stranger asked who this Orbasan was, and Achmet, the old merchant, answered him: "There are all kinds of legends among the people about that wonderful man. Some think he’s a superhuman being because he often fights with five or six men, others think he’s a brave Frank whom misfortune has brought to these parts; but of all that only so much is certain that he’s a wicked murderer and a thief."
"But you can’t say that," Lezah, one of the merchants, replied. "Even if he is a robber, he’s still a noble man, and as such he has proved himself as my brother, as I could tell you. He has made his whole tribe orderly men, and as long as he roams the desert no other tribe may dare to be seen. Nor does he rob like others, but only collects protection money from the caravans, and whoever willingly pays him that moves on safely; for Orbasan is the lord of the desert."
So the travellers in the tent talked among themselves; but the guards who were posted around the camp began to grow restless. A considerable number of armed horsemen had appeared at the distance of half an hour’s ride; they seemed to be coming straight towards the camp. One of the men on guard therefore went into the tent to announce that they were likely to be attacked. The merchants discussed among themselves what to do, whether to go to meet them or to wait for the attack. Achmet and the two older merchants wanted the latter, but the fiery Muley and Zaleukos demanded the former and called on the stranger to assist them. The latter calmly drew a small blue cloth with red stars from his belt, tied it to a lance, and ordered one of the slaves to pin it on the tent; he put his life in pledge, he said, that the horsemen, when they saw this sign, would pass quietly. Muley did’t believe in success but the slave stuck the lance on the tent. In the meantime, all who were in the camp had taken up arms and looked in eager expectation towards the horsemen. But the horsemen seemed to have seen the sign on the tent and they suddenly turned away from their direction towards the camp and moved in a wide arc on the side.
The travellers stood in amazement for a few moments, looking first at the horsemen and then at the stranger. The stranger stood indifferently in front of the tent, as if nothing had happened, and looked out over the plain. At last Muley broke the silence. "Who are you, mighty stranger," he exclaimed, "who tames the wild hordes of the desert with a wave of your hand?”
"You think my art is better than it is," replied Selim Baruch. "I put that mark on myself when I escaped from captivity; what it means I don’t know myself, but I do know that whoever travels with that mark is under powerful protection.
The merchants thanked the stranger and called him their saviour. The number of horsemen was so great that the caravan couldn’t have resisted for long.
With lighter hearts they now went to rest, and as the sun began to set and the evening wind swept across the sandy plain they set out and moved on.
The next day they camped about a day’s journey from the exit of the desert. When the travellers had gathered in the big tent again, Lezah the merchant took the floor:
"I told you yesterday that the dreaded Orbasan was a noble man, allow me to prove it to you today by telling you the fate of my brother. My father was a cadi in Akara. He had three children. I was the eldest, a brother and a sister were much younger than me. When I was twenty years old, one of my father’s brothers called me to him. He appointed me heir to his estate on the condition that I remain with him until his death. But he reached a great age, so that I returned to my home only two years ago and knew nothing of the terrible fate that had befallen my house in the meantime and how kindly Allah had turned it around:
Fatma’s Deliverance

The caravan had reached the end of the desert and the travellers greeted with joy the green mats and the thickly leafy trees, the lovely sight of which they had been deprived of for many days. In a beautiful valley lay a caravanserai, which they chose for their night’s lodging, and although it offered little comfort or refreshment, the whole company was more cheerful and cheerful than ever, for the thought of having escaped the dangers and hardships of a journey through the desert had opened all hearts and set the minds to joking and merrymaking. Muley, the young and merry merchant, danced a comic dance and sang songs that made even the serious Greek Zaleukos smile. But not only had he amused his companions by dancing and playing, he also told them the story he had promised them, and when he had recovered from his jumps in the air, he began to tell it: The Story of Little Muck

"So my father told me; I testified to him my remorse for my rough behaviour towards the good little man, and my father gave me the other half of the punishment he had intended for me. I told my comrades about the wonderful fate of the little one, and we became so fond of him that no one scolded him any more. On the contrary, we honoured him as long as he lived, and always bowed down before him as lowly as before Kadi and Mufti."
The travellers decided to take a rest day in this caravanserai to fortify themselves and the animals for the rest of the journey. Yesterday’s cheerfulness carried over to this day, and they enjoyed all kinds of games. After the meal, however, they called out to the fifth merchant, Ali Sizah, to do his duty like the others and tell a story. He replied that his life was too poor in remarkable events to tell them anything about them, so he wanted to tell them something else, namely: The Tale of the False Prince

At sunrise the caravan set out and soon reached Birket el Had, or the Fountain of the Pilgrims, from where it was only three hours’ journey to Cairo. The caravan had been expected at that time, and soon the merchants had the joy of seeing their friends from Cairo coming to meet them. They entered the city through the gate of Bebel Falch; for it is considered an auspicious omen when one comes from Mecca to enter through this gate, because the Prophet passed through it.
At the market, the four Turkish merchants said goodbye to the stranger and the Greek merchant Zaleukos and went home with their friends. But Zaleukos showed the stranger a good caravanserai and invited him to have lunch with him. The stranger agreed and promised to come, if only he had first changed his clothes.
The Greek had made every effort to entertain the stranger, whom he had become fond of on the journey, and when the food and drink had been properly arranged, he sat down to await his guest.
Slowly and with heavy steps he heard him coming up the corridor that led to his room. He rose to meet him in a friendly manner and to welcome him at the threshold; but he recoiled in horror as he opened the door, for that terrible red coat confronted him; he took another look at him, it was no deception; the same tall, commanding figure, the larva from which the dark eyes flashed at him, the red coat with the golden embroidery were all too familiar to him from the most terrible hours of his life.
Conflicting emotions surged in Zaleukos’ chest; he had long since reconciled himself to this image of his memory and forgiven it, and yet the sight of it tore open all his wounds again; all those agonising hours of mortal fear, that grief which poisoned the blossom of his life, passed his soul in the flight of an instant.
"What do you want, terrible one?" exclaimed the Greek, as the apparition still stood motionless on the threshold. "Get thee hence quickly, lest I curse thee!"
"Zaleukos!" spoke a familiar voice from under the larva. "Zaleukos! Is this how you receive your guest?" The speaker took off the larva and threw back his cloak; it was Selim Baruch, the stranger.
But Zaleukos still didn’t seem reassured, he was afraid of the stranger, for he had only too clearly recognised in him the stranger from the Ponte Vecchio; but the old habit of hospitality prevailed; he silently beckoned the stranger to sit down with him at the meal.
"I guess your thoughts," the latter took the floor when they were seated. "Your eyes look at me questioningly – I could have kept silent and never shown myself to your gaze again, but I owe you an account, and that’s why I dared to appear before you in my old form at the risk of you cursing me. You once said to me: ’The faith of my fathers commands me to love him, even though he is probably more unhappy than I am; believe this, my friend, and hear my justification!
I have to go a long way to make myself fully understood to you. I was born in Alessandria of Christian parents. My father, the younger son of an old, famous French house, was consul of his country in Alessandria. I was brought up from my tenth year in France with one of my mother’s brothers, and it was not until some years after the outbreak of the Revolution that I left my fatherland to seek a refuge over the sea with my parents, with my grandfather, who was no longer safe in the land of his ancestors. We landed in our parents’ house, full of hope of finding the peace and tranquillity that the outraged French people had snatched from us. But alas! I didn’t find everything in my father’s house as it should have been; the external storms of the turbulent times hadn’t yet reached here, but all the more unexpectedly misfortune had struck my house in its innermost heart. My brother, a hopeful young man, my father’s first secretary, had only recently married a young girl, the daughter of a Florentine nobleman who lived in our neighbourhood; two days before our arrival she had suddenly disappeared without either our family or her father being able to find the slightest trace of her. It was finally believed that she had ventured too far on a walk and had fallen into the hands of robbers. That thought would have been almost more comforting for my poor brother than the truth, that soon became known to us. The faithless woman had embarked with a young Neapolitan whom she had met at her father’s house. My brother, outraged by that, offered everything to bring the culprit to justice, but in vain; his attempts, that had caused a sensation in Naples and Florence, only served to complete his and all our misfortunes. The Florentine nobleman travelled back to his fatherland, pretending to bring justice to my brother, but in fact to ruin us. In Florence he put a stop to all the investigations that my brother had instigated, and knew how to use his influence, that he’d procured in every way, so well that my father and my brother were made suspicious to their government and were captured by the most shameful means, led to France and killed there by the executioner’s axe. My poor mother fell into madness, and only after ten long months did death deliver her from her terrible condition, that, however, had become full, clear consciousness in her last few days. So then I stood all alone in the world, but only one thought occupied my soul, only one thought made me forget my grief, it was the mighty flame that my mother had kindled in me in her last hour.
In the last hours, as I told you, her consciousness had returned; she sent for me and spoke calmly of our fate and of her end. Then, however, she had everyone leave the room, rose from her poor bed with a solemn face and said that I could earn her blessing if I swore to do something she would tell me to do. Taken by the dying mother’s words I swore to do as she would tell me. She then burst into imprecations against the Florentine and his daughter, and with the most fearful threats of her curse laid it upon me to avenge my unhappy house upon him. She died in my arms. The thought of revenge had long slumbered in my soul; now it awoke with all its might. I gathered the rest of my paternal fortune and vowed to stake everything on my revenge or perish with it myself.
I was soon in Florence, where I stayed as secretly as possible; my plan had been made much more difficult by the situation in which my enemies found themselves. The old Florentine had become Governor and thus had all the means at his disposal to destroy me as soon as he suspected the slightest thing. A coincidence came to my aid. One evening I saw a man in familiar livery walking through the streets; his unsteady gait, his dark look and the half loudly-uttered "Santo sacramento", "Maledetto diavolo" made me recognise old Pietro, a servant of the Florentine whom I had already known in Alessandria. I was in no doubt that he was in a rage against his master, and decided to take advantage of his mood. He seemed very surprised to see me there, lamented about his suffering to me, that since his master had become Governor he could no longer do anything right for him, and my gold, supported by his anger, soon brought him over to my side. The most difficult matter was now removed; I had a man in my guard who could open the door of my enemy to me at every hour, and now my plan of revenge ripened more and more rapidly. The life of the old Florentine seemed to me to have too little weight compared with the ruin of my family. He had to see his favourite murdered, and that was Bianka, his daughter. She had so shamefully betrayed my brother and she was the cause of our misfortune. Even my vengeful heart was glad to hear that Bianka was about to marry for the second time; I had been decided that she must die. But I myself was afraid to do the deed, and Pietro, too, didn’t trust himself to have enough strength; so we scouted around for a man who could do the job. Among the Florentines I didn’t dare to think of anyone, for no one would have done such a thing against the Governor. Then Pietro thought of the plan that I later carried out; at the same time he suggested you as a stranger and doctor as the most suitable. You know the result of the matter. It was only because of your great caution and honesty that my enterprise seemed to fail. Hence the coincidence with the coat.
Pietro opened the gate of the Governor’s palace for us; he would have led us out again just as secretly if we hadn’t fled, frightened by the terrible sight that presented itself to us through the crack in the door. Chased away by terror and remorse I had run more than two hundred steps away until I sank down on the steps of a church. Only there did I collect myself, and my first thought was of you and your terrible fate if you were found in the house. I crept up to the palace, but I could find no trace of either Pietro or you; but the gate was open, so I could at least hope that you might have used the opportunity to escape.
But when the day dawned, the fear of discovery and an undeniable feeling of remorse no longer left me within the walls of Florence. I hurried to Rome. But think of my consternation when after a few days the story was told everywhere, with the addition that the murderer, a Greek doctor, had been caught. I returned to Florence in anxious apprehension; for if my revenge had seemed too strong before, I cursed it now, for it had been too dearly bought by your life. I arrived on the same day that robbed you of your hand. I am silent of what I felt when I saw you mount the scaffold and suffer so heroically. But at that time, when your blood gushed out in streams, I was determined to sweeten the remaining days of your life. What happened next, you know, only this remains for me to say, why I made this journey with you.
The thought that you had still not forgiven me weighed heavily on me; therefore I decided to live with you for many days and finally give you an account of what I had done to you.
The Greek had listened to his guest in silence; when he had finished, he offered him his right hand with a gentle look. "I knew that you would be more unhappy than I, for that cruel deed will eternally darken your days like a dark cloud; I forgive you from the bottom of my heart. But allow me to ask you one more question: How did you come to the desert in this form? What did you do after you bought the house for me in Constantinople?
"I went back to Alessandria," the questioned man replied. "Hatred against all people raged in my breast, burning hatred especially against those nations which are called the educated ones. Believe me, I was more comfortable among my Muslims! I had hardly been in Alessandria for a few months when my compatriots landed.
I saw in them only the executioners of my father and brother; therefore I gathered some like-minded young people of my acquaintance and joined those brave Mamelukes who so often became the terror of the French army. When the campaign was over, I could not make up my mind to return to the arts of peace. I lived with a small number of like-minded friends an unsteady and fugitive life, devoted to fighting and hunting; I live contentedly among these people, who honour me as their prince; for though my Asiatics are not as educated as your Europeans, they are far removed from envy and slander, from selfishness and ambition."
Zaleukos thanked the stranger for his message, but he didn’t hide from him that he would find it more appropriate for his status, for his education, if he lived and worked in Christian, European countries. He took his hand and asked him to go with him, to live and die with him.
Touched, the guest looked at him. "I see from this," he said, "that you have forgiven me completely, that you love me. Take my heartfelt thanks for it!" He sprang to his feet and stood in all his grandeur before the Greek, who almost shrank from the warlike decorum, the dark flashing eyes, the deep voice of his guest. "Your proposal is beautiful," he went on, "it would be tempting for anyone else – I cannot use it. My horse is already saddled, my servants await me; farewell, Zaleukos!" The friends, so wonderfully brought together by fate, embraced each other in farewell. "And what do I call you? What is the name of my host who will live forever in my memory?" asked the Greek.
The stranger looked at him for a long time, squeezed his hand again and said: "They call me the Lord of the Desert; I am the robber Orbasan."


THE STORY OF CALIPH STORK

CHAPTER I

ONCE upon a time, on a fine afternoon, the Caliph Chasid was seated on his sofa in Bagdad: he had slept a little, (for it was a hot day,) and now, after his nap, looked quite happy. He smoked a long pipe of rosewood, sipped, now and then, a little coffee which a slave poured out for him, and stroked his beard, well-satisfied, for the flavor pleased him. In a word, it was evident that the Caliph was in a good humor. At this season one could easily speak with him, for he was always very mild and affable; on which account did his Grand-Vizier, Mansor, seek him at this hour, every day.
On the afternoon in question he also came, but looked very serious, quite contrary to his usual custom. The Caliph removed the pipe, a moment, from his mouth, and said, “Wherefore, Grand-Vizier, wearest thou so thoughtful a visage?”
The Grand-Vizier folded his arms crosswise over his breast, made reverence to his lord, and answered: “Sir, whether I wear a thoughtful look, I know not, but there, below the palace, stands a trader who has such fine goods, that it vexes me not to have abundant money.”
The Caliph, who had often before this gladly indulged his Vizier, sent down his black slave to bring up the merchant, and in a moment they entered together. He was a short, fat man, of swarthy countenance and tattered dress. He carried a chest in which were all kinds of wares—pearls and rings, richly-wrought pistols, goblets, and combs. The Caliph and his Vizier examined them all, and the former at length purchased fine pistols for himself and Mansor, and a comb for the Vizier’s wife. When the peddler was about to close his chest, the Caliph espied a little drawer, and inquired whether there were wares in that also. The trader drew forth the drawer, and pointed out therein a box of black powder, and a paper with strange characters, which neither the Caliph nor Mansor could read.
“I obtained these two articles, some time ago, from a merchant, who found them in the street at Mecca,” said the trader. “I know not what they contain. They are at your service for a moderate price; I can do nothing with them.” The Caliph, who gladly kept old manuscripts in his library, though he could not read them, purchased writing and box, and discharged the merchant. The Caliph, however, thought he would like to know what the writing contained, and asked the Vizier if he knew any one who could decipher it.
“Most worthy lord and master,” answered he, “near the great Mosque lives a man called ‘Selim the Learned,’ who understands all languages: let him come, perhaps he is acquainted with these mysterious characters.”
The learned Selim was soon brought in. “Selim,” said the Caliph to him, “Selim, they say thou art very wise; look a moment at this manuscript, and see if thou canst read it. If thou canst, thou shalt receive from me a new festival-garment; if not, thou shalt have twelve blows on the cheek, and five and twenty on the soles of the feet, since, in that case, thou art unjustly called Selim the Learned.”
Selim bowed himself and said, “Sire, thy will be done!” For a long time he pored over the manuscript, but suddenly exclaimed, “This is Latin, sire, or I will suffer myself to be hung.”
“If it is Latin, tell us what is therein,” commanded the Caliph. Selim began to translate:—
“Man, whosoever thou mayest be that findest this, praise Allah for his goodness! Whoever snuffs of the dust of this powder, and at the same time says Mutabor [4], can change himself into any animal, and shall also understand its language. If he wishes to return to the form of a man, then let him bow three times to the East, and repeat the same word. But take thou care, if thou be transformed, that thou laugh not; otherwise shall the magic word fade altogether from thy remembrance, and thou shalt remain a beast!”
When Selim the Learned had thus read, the Caliph was overjoyed. He made the translator swear to tell no one of their secret, presented him a beautiful garment, and discharged him. To his Grand-Vizier, however, he said: “That I call a good purchase, Mansor! How can I contain myself until I become an animal! Early in the morning, do thou come to me. Then will we go together into the country, take a little snuff out of my box, and hear what is said in the air and in the water, in the forest and in the field.”

CHAPTER II

SCARCELY, on the next morning, had the Caliph Chasid breakfasted and dressed himself, when the Grand-Vizier appeared, to accompany him, as he had commanded, on his walk. The Caliph placed the box with the magic powder in his girdle, and having commanded his train to remain behind, set out, all alone with Mansor, upon their expedition. They went at first through the extensive gardens of the Caliph, but looked around in vain for some living thing, in order to make their strange experiment. The Vizier finally proposed to go farther on, to a pond, where he had often before seen many storks, which, by their grave behavior and clattering, had always excited his attention. The Caliph approved of the proposition of his Vizier, and went with him to the pond. When they reached it they saw a stork walking gravely to and fro, seeking for frogs, and now and then clattering at something before her. Presently they saw, too, another stork hovering far up in the air.
“I will wager my beard, most worthy sire,” exclaimed the Grand-Vizier, “that these two long-feet are even now carrying on a fine conversation with one another. How would it be, if we should become storks?”
“Well spoken!” answered the Caliph. “But first, we will consider how we may become men again.—Right! Three times bow to the East, and exclaim ‘Mutabor!’ then will I be Caliph once more, and thou Vizier. Only, for the sake of Heaven, laugh not, or we are lost!”
While the Caliph was thus speaking, he saw the other stork hovering over their heads, and sinking slowly to the ground. He drew the box quickly out of his girdle, and took a good pinch; then he presented it to the Grand-Vizier, who also snuffed some of the powder, and both exclaimed “Mutabor!” Immediately their legs shrivelled away and became slender and red; the handsome yellow slippers of the Caliph and his companion became misshapen stork’s feet; their arms turned to wings; the neck extended up from the shoulders, and was an ell long; their beards had vanished, and their whole bodies were covered with soft feathers.
“You have a beautiful beak, my lord Grand-Vizier,” exclaimed the Caliph after long astonishment. “By the beard of the Prophet, in my whole life I have not seen any thing like it!”
“Most humble thanks!” responded the Vizier, as he bowed. “But if I dared venture it, I might assert that your Highness looks almost as handsome when a stork, as when a Caliph. But suppose, if it be pleasing to you, that we observe and listen to our comrades, to see, if we actually understand Storkish.”
Meanwhile the other stork reached the earth. He cleaned his feet with his bill, smoothed his feathers, and moved towards the first. Both the new birds, thereupon, made haste to draw near, and to their astonishment, heard the following conversation.
“Good-morning, Madam Long-legs; already, so early, upon the pond?”
“Fine thanks, beloved Clatter-beak. I have brought me a little breakfast. Would you like, perhaps, the quarter of an eider-duck, or a little frog’s thigh?”
“My best thanks, but this morning I have little appetite. I come to the pond for a very different reason. I have to dance to-day before the guests of my father, and I wish to practise a little in private.”
Immediately, thereupon, the young lady-stork stepped, in great excitement, over the plain. The Caliph and Mansor looked on her in amazement. When, however, she stood in a picturesque attitude upon one foot, and, at the same time, gracefully moved her wings like a fan, the two could contain themselves no longer; a loud laugh broke forth from their bills. The Caliph was the first to recover himself. “That were once a joke,” said he, “which gold could not have purchased. Pity! that the stupid birds should have been driven away by our laughter; otherwise they would certainly even yet have been singing.”
But already it occurred to the Grand-Vizier that, during their metamorphosis, laughter was prohibited; he shared his anxiety on this head with the Caliph. “By Mecca and Medina! that were a sorry jest, if I am to remain a stork. Bethink thyself, then, of the foolish word, for I can recall it not.”
“Three times must we bow ourselves to the East, and at the same time say, Mu—mu—mu—”
They turned to the East, and bowed so low that their beaks almost touched the earth. But, O misery! that magic word had escaped them; and though the Caliph prostrated himself again and again, though at the same time the Vizier earnestly cried “Mu—mu—,” all recollection thereof had vanished, and poor Chasid and his Vizier were to remain storks.

CHAPTER III

THE enchanted ones wandered sorrowfully through the fields, not knowing, in their calamity, what they should first set about. To the city they could not return, for the purpose of discovering themselves, for who would have believed a stork that he was the Caliph? or, if he should find credit, would the inhabitants of Bagdad have been willing to have such a bird for their master? Thus, for several days, did they wander around, supporting themselves on the produce of the fields, which, however, on account of their long bills, they could not readily pick up. For eider-ducks and frogs they had no appetite, for they feared with such dainty morsels to ruin their stomachs. In this pitiable situation their only consolation was that they could fly, and accordingly they often winged their way to the roofs of Bagdad, to see what was going on therein.
On the first day they observed great commotion and mourning in the streets; but on the fourth after their transformation, they lighted by chance upon the royal palace, from which they saw, in the street beneath, a splendid procession. Drums and fifes sounded; on a richly-caparisoned steed was seated a man, in a scarlet mantle embroidered with gold, surrounded by gorgeously-attired attendants. Half Bagdad was running after him, crying, “Hail, Mizra! Lord of Bagdad!” All this the two storks beheld from the roof of the palace, and the Caliph Chasid exclaimed,—
“Perceivest thou now why I am enchanted, Grand-Vizier? This Mizra is the son of my deadly enemy, the mighty sorcerer Kaschnur, who, in an evil hour, vowed revenge against me. Still I do not abandon all hope. Come with me, thou faithful companion of my misery; we will go to the grave of the Prophet; perhaps in that holy spot the charm may be dissolved.” They raised themselves from the roof of the palace, and flew in the direction of Medina.
In the use of their wings, however, they experienced some difficulty, for the two storks had, as yet, but little practice. “O Sire!” groaned out the Vizier, after a couple of hours; “with your permission, I can hold out no longer; you fly so rapidly! Besides, it is already evening, and we would do well to seek a shelter for the night.”
Chasid gave ear to the request of his attendant, and thereupon saw, in the vale beneath, a ruin which appeared to promise safe lodgings; and thither, accordingly, they flew. The place where they had alighted for the night, seemed formerly to have been a castle. Gorgeous columns projected from under the rubbish, and several chambers, which were still in a state of tolerable preservation, testified to the former magnificence of the mansion. Chasid and his companion went around through the corridor, to seek for themselves a dry resting-place; suddenly the stork Mansor paused. “Lord and master,” he whispered softly, “were it not foolish for a Grand-Vizier, still more for a stork, to be alarmed at spectres, my mind is very uncomfortable; for here, close at hand, sighs and groans are very plainly perceptible.” The Caliph now in turn stood still, and quite distinctly heard a low moaning, which seemed to belong rather to a human being than a beast. Full of expectation, he essayed to proceed to the place whence the plaintive sounds issued: but the Vizier, seizing him by the wing with his beak, entreated him fervently not to plunge them in new and unknown dangers. In vain! the Caliph, to whom a valiant heart beat beneath his stork-wing, burst away with the loss of a feather, and hastened into a gloomy gallery. In a moment he reached a door, which seemed only on the latch, and out of which he heard distinct sighs, accompanied by a low moaning. He pushed the door open with his bill, but stood, chained by amazement, upon the threshold. In the ruinous apartment, which was now but dimly lighted through a grated window, he saw a huge screech-owl sitting on the floor. Big tears rolled down from her large round eyes, and with ardent voice she sent her cries forth from her crooked bill. As soon, however, as she espied the Caliph and his Vizier, who meanwhile had crept softly up behind, she raised a loud cry of joy. She neatly wiped away the tears with her brown-striped wing, and to the great astonishment of both, exclaimed, in good human Arabic,—
“Welcome to you, storks! you are to me a good omen of deliverance, for it was once prophesied to me that, through storks, a great piece of good fortune is to fall to my lot.”
When the Caliph recovered from his amazement, he bowed his long neck, brought his slender feet into an elegant position, and said: “Screech-owl, after your words, I venture to believe that I see in you a companion in misfortune. But, alas! this hope that through us thy deliverance will take place, is groundless. Thou wilt, thyself, realize our helplessness, when thou hearest our history.”
The Screech-owl entreated him to impart it to her, and the Caliph, raising himself up, related what we already know.

CHAPTER IV

WHEN the Caliph had told his history to the owl, she thanked him, and said: “Listen to my story, also, and hear how I am no less unfortunate than thyself. My father is the king of India; I, his only, unfortunate daughter, am called Lusa. That same sorcerer Kaschnur, who transformed you, has plunged me also in this affliction. He came, one day, to my father, and asked me in marriage for his son Mizra. My father, however, who is a passionate man, cast him down the steps. The wretch managed to creep up to me again under another form, and as I was on one occasion taking the fresh air in my garden, clad as a slave, he presented me a potion which changed me into this detestable figure. He brought me hither, swooning through fear, and exclaimed in my ear with awful voice, ‘There shalt thou remain, frightful one, despised even by beasts, until thy death, or till one, of his own free will, even under this execrable form, take thee to wife. Thus revenge I myself upon thee, and thy haughty father!’
“Since then, many months have elapsed; alone and mournfully I live, like a hermit, in these walls, abhorred by the world, an abomination even to brutes. Beautiful nature is shut out from me; for I am blind by day, and only when the moon sheds her wan light upon this ruin, falls the shrouding veil from mine eye.”
The owl ended, and again wiped her eyes with her wing, for the narration of her woe had called forth tears. The Caliph was plunged in deep meditation by the story of the Princess. “If I am not altogether deceived,” said he, “you will find that between our misfortunes a secret connection exists; but where can I find the key to this enigma?”
The owl answered him, “My lord! this also is plain to me; for once, in early youth, it was foretold to me by a wise woman, that a stork would bring me great happiness, and perhaps I might know how we may save ourselves.”
The Caliph was much astonished, and inquired in what way she meant.
“The enchanter who has made us both miserable,” said she, “comes once every month to these ruins. Not far from this chamber is a hall; there, with many confederates, he is wont to banquet. Already I have often watched them: they relate to one another their shameful deeds—perhaps he might then mention the magic word which you have forgotten.”
“Oh, dearest Princess!” exclaimed the Caliph: “tell us—when will he come, and where is the hall?”
The owl was silent a moment, and then said: “Take it not unkindly, but only on one condition can I grant your wish.”
“Speak out! speak out!” cried Chasid. “Command; whatever it may be, I am ready to obey.”
“It is this: I would fain at the same time be free; this, however, can only take place, if one of you offer me his hand.” At this proposition the storks seemed somewhat surprised, and the Caliph beckoned to his attendant to step aside with him a moment. “Grand-Vizier,” said the Caliph before the door, “this is a stupid affair, but you can set it all right.”
“Thus?” rejoined he; “that my wife, when I go home, may scratch my eyes out? Besides, I am an old man, while you are still young and unmarried, and can better give your hand to a young and beautiful princess.”
“Ah! that is the point,” sighed the Caliph, as he mournfully drooped his wings: “who told you she is young and fair? That is equivalent to buying a cat in a sack!” They continued to converse together for a long time, but finally, when the Caliph saw that Mansor would rather remain a stork than marry the owl, he determined sooner, himself, to accept the condition. The owl was overjoyed; she avowed to them that they could have come at no better time, since, probably, that very night, the sorcerers would assemble together.
She left the apartment with the storks, in order to lead them to the saloon; they went a long way through a gloomy passage, until at last a very bright light streamed upon them through a half-decayed wall. When they reached this place, the owl advised them to halt very quietly. From the breach, near which they were standing, they could look down upon a large saloon, adorned all around with pillars, and splendidly decorated, in which many colored lamps restored the light of day. In the midst of the saloon stood a round table, laden with various choice meats. Around the table extended a sofa, on which eight men were seated. In one of these men the storks recognised the very merchant, who had sold them the magic powder. His neighbor desired him to tell them his latest exploits; whereupon he related, among others, the story of the Caliph and his Vizier.
“What did you give them for a word?” inquired of him one of the other magicians.
“A right ponderous Latin one—Mutabor.”

CHAPTER V

THEN the storks heard this through their chasm in the wall, they became almost beside themselves with joy. They ran so quickly with their long feet to the door of the ruin, that the owl could scarcely keep up with them. Thereupon spoke the Caliph to her: “Preserver of my life and that of my friend, in token of our eternal thanks for what thou hast done for us, take me as thy husband.” Then he turned to the East: three times they bowed their long necks towards the sun, which was even now rising above the mountains, and at the same moment exclaimed “Mutabor!” In a twinkling they were restored, and in the excessive joy of their newly-bestowed life, alternately laughing and weeping, were folded in each other’s arms. But who can describe their astonishment when they looked around? A beautiful woman, attired as a queen, stood before them. Smiling, she gave the Caliph her hand, and said, “Know you your screech-owl no longer?” It was she; the Caliph was in such transports at her beauty and pleasantness, as to cry out, that it was the most fortunate moment in his life, when he became a stork.
The three now proceeded together to Bagdad. The Caliph found in his dress, not only the box of magic powder, but also his money-bag. By means thereof, he purchased at the nearest village what was necessary for their journey, and accordingly they soon appeared before the gates of the city. Here, however, the arrival of the Caliph excited great astonishment. They had given out that he was dead, and the people were therefore highly rejoiced to have again their beloved lord.
So much the more, however, burned their hatred against the impostor Mizra. They proceeded to the palace, and caught the old magician and his son. The Caliph sent the old man to the same chamber in the ruin, which the princess, as a screech-owl, had inhabited, and there had him hung; unto the son, however, who understood nothing of his father’s arts, he gave his choice,—to die, or snuff some of the powder. Having chosen the latter, the Grand-Vizier presented him the box. A hearty pinch, and the magic word of the Caliph converted him into a stork. Chasid had him locked up in an iron cage, and hung in his garden.
Long and happily lived Caliph Chasid with his spouse, the Princess; his pleasantest hours were always those, when in the afternoon the Vizier sought him; and whenever the Caliph was in a very good humor, he would let himself down so far, as to show Mansor how he looked, when a stork. He would gravely march along, with rigid feet, up and down the chamber, make a clattering noise, wave his arms like wings, and show how, in vain, he had prostrated himself to the East, and cried out, Mu—mu. To the Princess and her children, this imitation always afforded great amusement: when, however, the Caliph clattered, and bowed, and cried out, too long, then the Vizier would threaten him that he would disclose to his spouse what had been proposed outside the door of the Princess Screech-owl!

When Selim Baruch had finished his story, the merchants declared themselves delighted therewith. “Verily, the afternoon has passed away from us without our having observed it!” exclaimed one of them, throwing back the covering of the tent: “the evening wind blows cool, we can still make a good distance on our journey.” To this his companions agreed; the tents were struck, and the Caravan proceeded on its way in the same order in which it had come up.
They rode almost all the night long, for it was refreshing and starry, whereas the day was sultry. At last they arrived at a convenient stopping-place; here they pitched their tents, and composed themselves to rest. To the stranger the merchants attended, as a most valued guest. One gave him cushions, a second covering, a third slaves; in a word, he was as well provided for as if he had been at home. The hottest hours of the day had already arrived, when they awoke again, and they unanimously determined to wait for evening in this place. After they had eaten together, they moved more closely to each other, and the young merchant, turning to the oldest, addressed him: “Selim Baruch yesterday made a pleasant afternoon for us; suppose Achmet, that you also tell us something, be it either from your long life, which has known so many adventures, or even a pretty Märchen.”
Upon these words Achmet was silent some time, as if he were in doubt whether to tell this or that; at last he began to speak: “Dear friends, on this our journey you have proved yourselves faithful companions, and Selim also deserves my confidence; I will therefore impart to you something of my life, of which, under other circumstances, I would speak reluctantly, and, indeed, not to anyone: The Story of the Spectre Ship.”


THE STORY OF THE SPECTRE SHIP

MY father had a little shop in Balsora; he was neither rich, nor poor, but one of those who do not like to risk anything, through fear of losing the little that they have. He brought me up plainly, but virtuously, and soon I advanced so far, that I was able to make valuable suggestions to him in his business. When I reached my eighteenth year, in the midst of his first speculation of any importance, he died; probably through anxiety at having intrusted a thousand gold pieces to the sea. I was obliged, soon after, to deem him happy in his fortunate death, for in a few weeks the intelligence reached us, that the vessel, to which my father had committed his goods, had been wrecked. This misfortune, however, could not depress my youthful spirits. I converted all that my father had left into money, and set out to try my fortune in foreign lands, accompanied only by an old servant of the family, who, on account of ancient attachment, would not part from me and my destiny.
In the harbor of Balsora we embarked, with a favorable wind. The ship, in which I had taken passage, was bound to India. We had now for fifteen days sailed in the usual track, when the Captain predicted to us a storm. He wore a thoughtful look, for it seemed he knew that, in this place, there was not sufficient depth of water to encounter a storm with safety. He ordered them to take in all sail, and we moved along quite slowly. The night set in clear and cold, and the Captain began to think that he had been mistaken in his forebodings. All at once there floated close by ours, a ship which none of us had observed before. A wild shout and cry ascended from the deck, at which, occurring at this anxious season, before a storm, I wondered not a little. But the Captain by my side was deadly pale: “My ship is lost,” cried he; “there sails Death!” Before I could demand an explanation of these singular words, the sailors rushed in, weeping and wailing. “Have you seen it?” they exclaimed: “all is now over with us!”
But the Captain had words of consolation read to them out of the Koran, and seated himself at the helm. But in vain! The tempest began visibly to rise with a roaring noise, and, before an hour passed by, the ship struck and remained aground. The boats were lowered, and scarcely had the last sailors saved themselves, when the vessel went down before our eyes, and I was launched, a beggar, upon the sea. But our misfortune had still no end. Frightfully roared the tempest, the boat could no longer be governed. I fastened myself firmly to my old servant, and we mutually promised not to be separated from each other. At last the day broke, but, with the first glance of the morning-red, the wind struck and upset the boat in which we were seated. After that I saw my shipmates no more. The shock deprived me of consciousness, and when I returned to my senses, I found myself in the arms of my old faithful attendant, who had saved himself on the boat which had been upturned, and had come in search of me. The storm had abated; of our vessel there was nothing any more to be seen, but we plainly descried, at no great distance from us, another ship, towards which the waves were driving us. As we approached, I recognised the vessel as the same which had passed by us in the night, and which had thrown the Captain into such consternation. I felt a strange horror of this ship; the intimation of the Captain, which had been so fearfully corroborated, the desolate appearance of the ship, on which, although as we drew near we uttered loud cries, no one was visible, alarmed me. Nevertheless this was our only expedient; accordingly, we praised the Prophet, who had so miraculously preserved us.
From the fore-part of the ship hung down a long cable; for the purpose of laying hold of this, we paddled with our hands and feet. At last we were successful. Loudly I raised my voice, but all remained quiet as ever, on board the vessel. Then we climbed up by the rope, I, as the youngest, taking the lead. But horror! what a spectacle was there presented to my eye, as I stepped upon the deck! The floor was red with blood; upon it lay twenty or thirty corpses in Turkish costume; by the middle-mast stood a man richly attired, with sabre in hand—but his face was wan and distorted; through his forehead passed a large spike which fastened him to the mast—he was dead! Terror chained my feet; I dared hardly to breathe. At last my companion stood by my side; he, too, was overpowered at sight of the deck which exhibited no living thing, but only so many frightful corpses. After having, in the anguish of our souls, supplicated the Prophet, we ventured to move forward. At every step we looked around to see if something new, something still more horrible, would not present itself. But all remained as it was—far and wide, no living thing but ourselves, and the ocean-world. Not once did we dare to speak aloud, through fear that the dead Captain there nailed to the mast would bend his rigid eyes upon us, or lest one of the corpses should turn his head. At last we arrived at a staircase, which led into the hold. There involuntarily we came to a halt, and looked at each other, for neither of us exactly ventured to express his thoughts.
“Master,” said my faithful servant, “something awful has happened here. Nevertheless, even if the ship down there below is full of murderers, still would I rather submit myself to their mercy or cruelty, than spend a longer time among these dead bodies.” I agreed with him, and so we took heart, and descended, full of apprehension. But the stillness of death prevailed here also, and there was no sound save that of our steps upon the stairs. We stood before the door of the cabin; I applied my ear, and listened—there was nothing to be heard. I opened it. The room presented a confused appearance; clothes, weapons, and other articles, lay disordered together. The crew, or at least the Captain, must shortly before have been carousing, for the remains of a banquet lay scattered around. We went on from room to room, from chamber to chamber finding, in all, royal stores of silk, pearls, and other costly articles. I was beside myself with joy at the sight, for as there was no one on the ship, I thought I could appropriate all to myself; but Ibrahim thereupon called to my notice that we were still far from land, at which we could not arrive, alone and without human help.
We refreshed ourselves with the meats and drink, which we found in rich profusion, and at last ascended upon deck. But here again we shivered at the awful sight of the bodies. We determined to free ourselves therefrom, by throwing them overboard; but how were we startled to find, that no one could move them from their places! So firmly were they fastened to the floor, that to remove them one would have had to take up the planks of the deck, for which tools were wanting to us. The Captain, moreover, could not be loosened from the mast, nor could we even wrest the sabre from his rigid hand. We passed the day in sorrowful reflection on our condition; and, when night began to draw near, I gave permission to the old Ibrahim to lie down to sleep, while I would watch upon the deck, to look out for means of deliverance. When, however, the moon shone forth, and by the stars I calculated that it was about the eleventh hour, sleep so irresistibly overpowered me that I fell back, involuntarily, behind a cask which stood upon the deck. It was rather lethargy than sleep, for I plainly heard the sea beat against the side of the vessel, and the sails creak and whistle in the wind. All at once I thought I heard voices, and the steps of men upon the deck. I wished to arise and see what it was, but a strange power fettered my limbs, and I could not once open my eyes. But still more distinct became the voices; it appeared to me as if a merry crew were moving around upon the deck. In the midst of this I thought I distinguished the powerful voice of a commander, followed by the noise of ropes and sails. Gradually my senses left me; I fell into a deep slumber, in which I still seemed to hear the din of weapons, and awoke only when the sun was high in the heavens, and sent down his burning rays upon my face. Full of wonder, I gazed about me; storm, ship, the bodies, and all that I had heard in the night, recurred to me as a dream; but when I looked around, I found all as it had been the day before. Immoveable lay the bodies, immovably was the Captain fastened to the mast; I laughed at my dream, and proceeded in search of my old companion.
The latter was seated in sorrowful meditation in the cabin. “O master,” he exclaimed as I entered, “rather would I lie in the deepest bottom of the sea, than pass another night in this enchanted ship.” I asked him the reason of his grief, and thus he answered me:—
“When I had slept an hour, I awoke, and heard the noise of walking to and fro over my head. I thought at first that it was you, but there were at least twenty running around; I also heard conversation and cries. At length came heavy steps upon the stairs. After this I was no longer conscious; but at times my recollection returned for a moment, and then I saw the same man who is nailed to the mast, sit down at that table, singing and drinking; and he who lies not far from him on the floor, in a scarlet cloak, sat near him, and helped him to drink.” Thus spoke my old servant to me.
You may believe me, my friends, that all was not right to my mind; for there was no delusion—I too had plainly heard the dead. To sail in such company was to me horrible; my Ibrahim, however, was again absorbed in deep reflection. “I have it now!” he exclaimed at length; there occurred to him, namely, a little verse, which his grandfather, a man of experience and travel, had taught him, and which could give assistance against every ghost and spectre. He also maintained that we could, the next night, prevent the unnatural sleep which had come upon us, by repeating right fervently sentences out of the Koran.
The proposition of the old man pleased me well. In anxious expectation we saw the night set in. Near the cabin was a little room, to which we determined to retire. We bored several holes in the door, large enough to give us a view of the whole cabin; then we shut it as firmly as we could from within, and Ibrahim wrote the name of the Prophet in all four corners of the room. Thus we awaited the terrors of the night.
It might again have been about the eleventh hour, when a strong inclination for sleep began to overpower me. My companion, thereupon, advised me to repeat some sentences from the Koran, which assisted me to retain my consciousness. All at once it seemed to become lively overhead; the ropes creaked, there were steps upon the deck, and several voices were plainly distinguishable. We remained, a few moments, in intense anxiety; then we heard something descending the cabin stairs. When the old man became aware of this, he began to repeat the words which his grandfather had taught him to use against spirits and witchcraft:

“Come you, from the air descending,
Rise you from the deep sea-cave,
Spring you forth where flames are blending,
Glide you in the dismal grave:
Allah reigns, let all adore him!
Own him, spirits—bow before him!”

I must confess I did not put much faith in this verse, and my hair stood on end when the door flew open. The same large, stately man entered, whom I had seen nailed to the mast. The spike still passed through the middle of his brain, but he had sheathed his sword. Behind him entered another, attired with less magnificence, whom also I had seen lying on the deck. The Captain, for he was unquestionably of this rank, had a pale countenance, a large black beard, and wildly-rolling eyes, with which he surveyed the whole apartment. I could see him distinctly, for he moved over opposite to us; but he appeared not to observe the door which concealed us. The two seated themselves at the table, which stood in the centre of the cabin, and spoke loud and fast, shouting together in an unknown tongue. They continually became more noisy and earnest, until at length, with doubled fist, the Captain brought the table a blow which shook the whole apartment. With wild laughter the other sprang up, and beckoned to the Captain to follow him. The latter rose, drew his sabre, and then both left the apartment. We breathed more freely when they were away; but our anxiety had still for a long time no end. Louder and louder became the noise upon deck; we heard hasty running to and fro, shouting, laughing, and howling. At length there came an actually hellish sound, so that we thought the deck and all the sails would fall down upon us, the clash of arms, and shrieks—of a sudden all was deep silence. When, after many hours, we ventured to go forth, we found every thing as before; not one lay differently—all were as stiff as wooden figures.

Thus passed we several days on the vessel; it moved continually towards the East, in which direction, according to my calculation, lay the land; but if by day it made many miles, by night it appeared to go back again, for we always found ourselves in the same spot when the sun went down. We could explain this in no other way, than that the dead men every night sailed back again with a full breeze. In order to prevent this, we took in all the sail before it became night, and employed the same means as at the door in the cabin; we wrote on parchment the name of the Prophet, and also, in addition, the little stanza of the grandfather, and bound them upon the furled sail. Anxiously we awaited the result in our chamber. The ghosts appeared this time not to rage so wickedly; and, mark, the next morning the sails were still rolled up as we had left them. During the day we extended only as much as was necessary to bear the ship gently along, and so in five days we made considerable headway.
At last, on the morning of the sixth day, we espied land at a short distance, and thanked Allah and his Prophet for our wonderful deliverance. This day and the following night we sailed along the coast, and on the seventh morning thought we discovered a city at no great distance: with a good deal of trouble we cast an anchor into the sea, which soon reached the bottom; then launching a boat which stood upon the deck, we rowed with all our might towards the city. After half an hour we ran into a river that emptied into the sea, and stepped ashore. At the gate we inquired what the place was called, and learned that it was an Indian city, not far from the region to which at first I had intended to sail. We repaired to a caravansary, and refreshed ourselves after our adventurous sail. I there inquired for a wise and intelligent man, at the same time giving the landlord to understand that I would like to have one tolerably conversant with magic. He conducted me to an unsightly house in a remote street, knocked thereat, and one let me in with the injunction that I should ask only for Muley.
In the house, came to me a little old man with grizzled beard and a long nose, to demand my business. I told him I was in search of the wise Muley; he answered me that he was the man. I then asked his advice as to what I should do to the dead bodies, and how I must handle them in order to remove them from the ship.
He answered me that the people of the ship were probably enchanted on account of a crime somewhere upon the sea: he thought the spell would be dissolved by bringing them to land, but this could be done only by taking up the planks on which they lay. In the sight of God and justice, he said that the ship, together with all the goods, belonged to me, since I had, as it were, found it; and, if I would keep it very secret, and make him a small present out of my abundance, he would assist me with his slaves to remove the bodies. I promised to reward him richly, and we set out on our expedition with five slaves, who were supplied with saws and hatchets. On the way, the magician Muley could not sufficiently praise our happy expedient of binding the sails around with the sentences from the Koran. He said this was the only means, by which we could have saved ourselves.
It was still pretty early in the day when we reached the ship. We immediately set to work, and in an hour placed four in the boat. Some of the slaves were then obliged to row to land to bury them there. They told us, when they returned, that the bodies had spared them the trouble of burying, since, the moment they laid them on the earth, they had fallen to dust. We diligently set to work to saw off the bodies, and before evening all were brought to land. There were, at last, no more on board than the one that was nailed to the mast. Vainly sought we to draw the nail out of the wood, no strength was able to start it even a hair’s-breadth. I knew not what next to do, for we could not hew down the mast in order to bring him to land; but in this dilemma Muley came to my assistance. He quickly ordered a slave to row to land and bring a pot of earth. When he had arrived with it, the magician pronounced over it some mysterious words, and cast it on the dead man’s head. Immediately the latter opened his eyes, drew a deep breath, and the wound of the nail in his forehead began to bleed. We now drew it lightly forth, and the wounded man fell into the arms of one of the slaves.
“Who bore me hither?” he exclaimed, after he seemed to have recovered himself a little. Muley made signs to me, and I stepped up to him.
“Thank thee, unknown stranger; thou hast freed me from long torment. For fifty years has my body been sailing through these waves, and my spirit was condemned to return to it every night. But now my head has come in contact with the earth, and, my crime expiated, I can go to my fathers!”
I entreated him, thereupon, to tell how he had been brought to this horrible state, and he began—
“Fifty years ago, I was an influential, distinguished man, and resided in Algiers: a passion for gain urged me on to fit out a ship, and turn pirate. I had already followed this business some time, when once, at Zante, I took on board a Dervish, who wished to travel for nothing. I and my companions were impious men, and paid no respect to the holiness of the man; I, in particular, made sport of him. When, however, on one occasion he upbraided me with holy zeal for my wicked course of life, that same evening, after I had been drinking to excess with my pilot in the cabin, anger overpowered me. Reflecting on what the Dervish had said to me, which I would not have borne from a Sultan, I rushed upon deck, and plunged my dagger into his breast. Dying, he cursed me and my crew, and doomed us not to die and not to live, until we should lay our heads upon the earth.
“The Dervish expired, and we cast him overboard, laughing at his menaces; that same night, however, were his words fulfilled. One portion of my crew rose against me; with terrible courage the struggle continued, until my supporters fell, and I myself was nailed to the mast. The mutineers, however, also sank under their wounds, and soon my ship was but one vast grave. My eyes also closed, my breath stopped—I thought I was dying. But it was only a torpor which held me chained: the following night, at the same hour in which we had cast the Dervish into the sea, I awoke, together with all my comrades; life returned, but we could do and say nothing but what had been done and said on that fatal night. Thus we sailed for fifty years, neither living nor dying, for how could we reach the land? With mad joy we ever dashed along, with full sails, before the storm, for we hoped at last to be wrecked upon some cliff, and to compose our weary heads to rest upon the bottom of the sea; but in this we never succeeded. Now I shall die! Once again, unknown preserver, accept my thanks, and if treasures can reward thee, then take my ship in token of my gratitude.”
With these words the Captain let his head drop, and expired. Like his companions, he immediately fell to dust. We collected this in a little vessel, and buried it on the shore: and I took workmen from the city to put the ship in good condition. After I had exchanged, with great advantage, the wares I had on board for others, I hired a crew, richly rewarded my friend Muley, and set sail for my fatherland. I took a circuitous route, in the course of which I landed at several islands and countries, to bring my goods to market. The Prophet blessed my undertaking. After several years I ran into Balsora, twice as rich as the dying Captain had made me. My fellow-citizens were amazed at my wealth and good fortune, and would believe nothing else but that I had found the diamond-valley of the far-famed traveller Sinbad. I left them to their belief; henceforth must the young folks of Balsora, when they have scarcely arrived at their eighteenth year, go forth into the world, like me, to seek their fortunes. I, however, live in peace and tranquillity, and every five years make a journey to Mecca, to thank the Lord for his protection, in that holy place, and to entreat for the Captain and his crew, that He will admit them into Paradise.

The march of the Caravan proceeded the next day without hinderance, and when they halted, Selim the Stranger began thus to speak to Muley, the youngest of the merchants:
“You are, indeed, the youngest of us, nevertheless you are always in fine spirits, and, to a certainty, know for us, some right merry story. Out with it then, that it may refresh us after the heat of the day.”
“I might easily tell you something,” answered Muley, “which would amuse you, nevertheless modesty becomes youth in all things; therefore must my older companions have the precedence. Zaleukos is ever so grave and reserved; should not he tell us what has made his life so serious? Perhaps we could assuage his grief, if such he have; for gladly would we serve a brother, even if he belong to another creed.”
The person alluded to was a Grecian merchant of middle age, handsome and strongly built, but very serious. Although he was an unbeliever, (that is, no Mussulman,) still his companions were much attached to him, for his whole conduct had inspired them with respect and confidence. He had only one hand, and some of his companions conjectured that, perhaps, this loss gave so grave a tone to his character. Zaleukos thus answered Muley’s friendly request:
“I am much honored by your confidence: grief have I none, at least none from which, even with your best wishes, you can relieve me. Nevertheless, since Muley appears to blame me for my seriousness, I will relate to you something which will justify me when I am more grave than others. You see that I have lost my left hand; this came not to me at my birth, but I lost it in the most unhappy days of my life. Whether I bear the fault thereof, whether I am wrong to be more serious than my condition in life would seem to make me, you must decide, when I have told you the Story of the Hewn-off Hand.”


THE STORY OF THE HEWN-OFF HAND

I WAS born in Constantinople; my father was a Dragoman [5] of the Ottoman Porte [6], and carried on, besides, a tolerably lucrative trade in essences and silk goods. He gave me a good education, since he partly superintended it himself, and partly had me instructed by one of our priests. At first, he intended that I should one day take charge of his business: but since I displayed greater capacity than he expected, with the advice of his friends, he resolved that I should study medicine; for a physician, if he just knows more than a common quack, can make his fortune in Constantinople.
Many Frenchmen were in the habit of coming to our house, and one of them prevailed upon my father to let me go to the city of Paris, in his fatherland, where one could learn the profession gratuitously, and with the best advantages: he himself would take me with him, at his own expense, when he returned. My father, who in his youth had also been a traveller, consented, and the Frenchman told me to hold myself in readiness in three months. I was beside myself with delight to see foreign lands, and could not wait for the moment in which we should embark. At last the stranger had finished his business, and was ready to start.
On the evening preceding our voyage, my father conducted me into his sleeping apartment; there I saw fine garments and weapons lying on the table; but what most attracted my eye was a large pile of gold, for I had never before seen so much together. My father embraced me, and said,
“See, my son, I have provided thee with garments for thy journey. These weapons are thine; they are those which thy grandfather hung upon me, when I went forth into foreign lands. I know thou canst wield them; but use them not, unless thou art attacked; then, however, lay on with right good-will. My wealth is not great; see! I have divided it into three parts: one is thine; one shall be for my support, and spare money in case of necessity; the third shall be sacred and untouched by me, it may serve thee in the hour of need.” Thus spoke my old father, while tears hung in his eyes, perhaps from a presentiment, for I have never seen him since.
Our voyage was favorable; we soon reached the land of the Franks, and six days’ journey brought us to the large city, Paris. Here my French friend hired me a room, and advised me to be prudent in spending my money, which amounted to two thousand thalers. In this city I lived three years, and learned all that a well-educated physician should know. I would be speaking falsely, however, if I said that I was very happy, for the customs of the people pleased me not; moreover, I had but few good friends among them, but these were young men of nobility.
The longing after my native land at length became irresistible; during the whole time I had heard nothing from my father, and I therefore seized a favorable opportunity to return home. There, an embassy was going from France to the Supreme Porte: I agreed to join the train of the ambassador as surgeon, and soon arrived once more at Stamboul.
My father’s dwelling, however, I found closed, and the neighbors, astonished at seeing me, said that my father had been dead for two months. The priest, who had instructed me in youth, brought me the key. Alone and forsaken, I entered the desolate house. I found all as my father had left it; but the gold which he promised to leave to me, was missing. I inquired of the priest respecting it, and he bowed and said:
“Your father died like a holy man, for he left his gold to the Church!”
This was incomprehensible to me; nevertheless, what could I do? I had no proofs against the priest, and could only congratulate myself that he had not also looked upon the house, and wares of my father, in the light of a legacy. This was the first misfortune that met me; but after this came one upon another. My reputation as a physician would not extend itself, because I was ashamed to play the quack; above all, I missed the recommendation of my father, who had introduced me to the richest and most respectable families; but now they thought no more of the poor Zaleukos. Moreover, the wares of my father found no sale, for his customers had been scattered at his death, and new ones came only after a long time. One day, as I was reflecting sorrowfully upon my situation, it occurred to me that in France I had often seen countrymen of mine, who travelled through the land, and exposed their goods at the market-places of the cities: I recollected that people gladly purchased of them, because they came from foreign lands; and that by such a trade, one could make a hundred-fold. My resolution was forthwith taken; I sold my paternal dwelling, gave a portion of the money obtained thereby to a tried friend to preserve for me, and with the remainder purchased such articles as were rare in France,—shawls, silken goods, ointments, and oils; for these I hired a place upon a vessel, and thus began my second voyage to France. It appeared as if fortune became favorable to me, the moment I had the Straits of the Dardanelles upon my back. Our voyage was short and prosperous. I travelled through the cities of France, large and small, and found, in all, ready purchasers for my goods. My friend in Stamboul continually sent me fresh supplies, and I became richer from day to day. At last when I had husbanded so well, that I believed myself able to venture on some more extensive undertaking, I went with my wares into Italy. I must, however, mention something that brought me in no little money; I called my profession also to my assistance. As soon as I arrived in a city I announced, by means of bills, that a Grecian physician was there, who had already cured many; and, truly, my balsam, and my medicines, had brought me in many a zechin.
Thus at last I reached the city of Florence, in Italy. I proposed to myself to remain longer than usual in this place, partly because it pleased me so well, partly, moreover, that I might recover from the fatigues of my journey. I hired myself a shop in the quarter of the city called St. Croce, and in a tavern not far therefrom, took a couple of fine rooms which led out upon a balcony. Immediately I had my bills carried around, which announced me as a physician and merchant. I had no sooner opened my shop than buyers streamed in upon me, and although I asked a tolerably high price, still I sold more than others, because I was attentive and friendly to my customers.
Well satisfied, I had spent four days in Florence, when one evening, after I had shut my shop, and according to custom was examining my stock of ointment-boxes, I found, in one of the smaller ones, a letter which I did not remember to have put in. I opened it and found therein an invitation to repair that night, punctually at twelve, to the bridge called the Ponte Vecchio. For some time I reflected upon this, as to who it could be that had thus invited me; as, however, I knew not a soul in Florence, I thought, as had often happened already, that one wished to lead me privately to some sick person. Accordingly I resolved to go; nevertheless, as a precautionary measure, I put on the sabre which my father had given me. As it was fast approaching midnight, I set out upon my way, and soon arrived at the Ponte Vecchio; I found the bridge forsaken and desolate, and resolved to wait until it should appear who had addressed me.
It was a cold night; the moon shone clear as I looked down upon the waters of the Arno, which sparkled in her light. On the church of the city the twelfth hour was sounding, when I looked up, and before me stood a tall man, entirely covered with a red cloak, a corner of which he held before his face. At this sudden apparition I was at first somewhat startled, but I soon recovered myself and said—
“If you have summoned me hither, tell me, what is your pleasure?”
The Red-mantle turned, and solemnly ejaculated, “Follow!”
My mind was nevertheless somewhat uneasy at the idea of going alone with this Unknown; I stood still and said, “Not so, dear sir; you will first tell me whither; moreover, you may show me your face a little, that I may see whether you have good intentions towards me.”
The Stranger, however, appeared not to be concerned thereat. “If thou wishest it not, Zaleukos, then remain!” answered he, moving away. At this my anger burned.
“Think you,” I cried, “that I will suffer a man to play the fool with me, and wait here this cold night for nothing?” In three bounds I reached him; crying still louder, I seized him by the cloak, laying the other hand upon my sabre; but the mantle remained in my hand, and the Unknown vanished around the nearest corner. My anger gradually cooled; I still had the cloak, and this should furnish the key to this strange adventure. I put it on, and moved towards home. Before I had taken a hundred steps, somebody passed very near, and whispered in the French tongue, “Observe, Count, to-night, we can do nothing.” Before I could look around, this somebody had passed, and I saw only a shadow hovering near the houses. That this exclamation was addressed to the mantle, and not to me, I plainly perceived; nevertheless, this threw no light upon the matter. Next morning I considered what was best to be done. At first I thought of having proclamation made respecting the cloak, that I had found it; but in that case the Unknown could send for it by a third person, and I would have no explanation of the matter. While thus meditating I took a nearer view of the garment. It was of heavy Genoese velvet, of dark red color, bordered with fur from Astrachan, and richly embroidered with gold. The gorgeousness of the cloak suggested to me a plan, which I resolved to put in execution. I carried it to my shop and offered it for sale, taking care, however, to set so high a price upon it, that I would be certain to find no purchaser. My object in this was to fix my eye keenly upon every one who should come to inquire after it; for the figure of the Unknown, which, after the loss of the mantle, had been exposed to me distinctly though transiently, I could recognise out of thousands. Many merchants came after the cloak, the extraordinary beauty of which drew all eyes upon it; but none bore the slightest resemblance to the Unknown, none would give for it the high price of two hundred zechins. It was surprising to me, that when I asked one and another whether there was a similar mantle in Florence, all answered in the negative, and protested that they had never seen such costly and elegant workmanship.
It was just becoming evening, when at last there came a young man who had often been in there, and had also that very day bid high for the mantle; he threw upon the table a bag of zechins, exclaiming—
“By Heaven! Zaleukos, I must have your mantle, should I be made a beggar by it.” Immediately he began to count out his gold pieces. I was in a great dilemma; I had exposed the mantle, in order thereby to get a sight of my unknown friend, and now came a young simpleton to give the unheard-of price. Nevertheless, what remained for me? I complied, for on the other hand the reflection consoled me, that my night adventure would be so well rewarded. The young man put on the cloak and departed; he turned, however, upon the threshold, while he loosened a paper which was attached to the collar, and threw it towards me, saying, “Here, Zaleukos, hangs something, that does not properly belong to my purchase.” Indifferently, I received the note; but lo! these were the contents:—
“This night, at the hour thou knowest, bring the mantle to the Ponte Vecchio; four hundred zechins await thee!”
I stood as one thunder-struck: thus had I trifled with fortune, and entirely missed my aim. Nevertheless, I reflected not long; catching up the two hundred zechins, I bounded to the side of the young man and said, “Take your zechins again, my good friend, and leave me the cloak; I cannot possibly part with it.”
At first he treated the thing as a jest, but when he saw it was earnest, he fell in a passion at my presumption, and called me a fool; and thus at last we came to blows. I was fortunate enough to seize the mantle in the scuffle, and was already making off with it, when the young man called the police to his assistance, and had both of us carried before a court of justice. The magistrate was much astonished at the accusation, and adjudged the cloak to my opponent. I however, offered the young man twenty, fifty, eighty, at last a hundred, zechins, in addition to his two hundred, if he would surrender it to me. What my entreaties could not accomplish, my gold did. He took my good zechins, while I went off in triumph with the mantle, obliged to be satisfied with being taken for a madman by every one in Florence. Nevertheless, the opinion of the people was a matter of indifference to me, for I knew better than they, that I would still gain by the bargain.
With impatience I awaited the night; at the same hour as the preceding day, I proceeded to the Ponte Vecchio, the mantle under my arm. With the last stroke of the clock, came the figure out of darkness to my side: beyond a doubt it was the man of the night before.
“Hast thou the cloak?” I was asked.
“Yes, sir,” I replied, “but it cost me a hundred zechins cash.”
“I know it,” rejoined he; “look, here are four hundred.” He moved with me to the broad railing of the bridge and counted out the gold pieces; brightly they glimmered in the moonshine, their lustre delighted my heart—ah! it did not foresee that this was to be its last joy. I put the money in my pocket, and then wished to get a good view of the generous stranger, but he had a mask before his face, through which two dark eyes frightfully beamed upon me.
“I thank you, sir, for your kindness,” said I to him; “what further desire you of me? I told you before, however, that it must be nothing evil.”
“Unnecessary trouble,” answered he, throwing the cloak over his shoulders; “I needed your assistance as a physician, nevertheless not for a living, but for a dead person.”
“How can that be?” exclaimed I in amazement.
“I came with my sister from a distant land,” rejoined he, at the same time motioning me to follow him, “and took up my abode with a friend of our family. A sudden disease carried off my sister yesterday, and our relations wished to bury her this morning. According to an old usage of our family, however, all are to repose in the sepulchre of our fathers; many who have died in foreign lands, nevertheless sleep there embalmed. To my relations now I grant the body, but to my father must I bring at least the head of his daughter, that he may see it once again.”
In this custom of severing the head from near relatives there was to me, indeed, something awful; nevertheless, I ventured to say nothing against it, through fear of offending the Unknown. I told him, therefore, that I was well acquainted with the art of embalming the dead, and asked him to lead me to the body. Notwithstanding, I could not keep myself from inquiring why all this must be done so secretly in the night. He answered me that his relations, who considered his purpose inhuman, would prevent him from accomplishing it by day; but only let the head once be cut off, and they could say little more about it: he could, indeed, have brought the head to me, but a natural feeling prevented him from cutting it off himself.
These words brought us to a large splendid house; my companion pointed it out to me as the termination of our nocturnal walk. We passed the principal door, and entering a small gate, which the stranger carefully closed after him, ascended, in the dark, a narrow, winding staircase. This brought us to a dimly-lighted corridor, from which we entered an apartment; a lamp, suspended from the ceiling, shed its brilliant rays around.
In this chamber stood a bed, on which lay the corpse; the Unknown turned away his face, as if wishing to conceal his tears. He beckoned me to the bed, and bidding me set about my business speedily yet carefully, went out by the door.
I seized my knives, which, as a physician, I constantly carried with me, and approached the bed. Only the head of the corpse was visible, but that was so beautiful that the deepest compassion involuntarily came over me. In long braids the dark hair hung down; the face was pale, the eyes closed. At first, I made an incision in the skin, according to the practice of surgeons when they remove a limb. Then I took my sharpest knife and cut entirely through the throat. But, horror! the dead opened her eyes—shut them again—and in a deep sigh seemed now, for the first time, to breathe forth her life! Straightway a stream of hot blood sprang forth from the wound. I was convinced that I had killed the poor girl; for that she was dead there could be no doubt—from such a wound there was no chance of recovering. I stood some moments in anxious woe, thinking on what had happened. Had the Red-mantle deceived me, or was his sister, perhaps, only apparently dead? The latter appeared to me more probable. Yet I dared not tell the brother of the deceased, that, perhaps, a less rash blow would have aroused, without having killed her; therefore I began to sever the head entirely—but once again the dying one groaned, stretched herself out in a convulsion of pain, and breathed her last. Then terror overpowered me, and I rushed shivering out of the apartment.
But outside in the corridor it was dark, for the lamp had died out; no trace of my companion was perceptible, and I was obliged to move along by the wall, at hazard in the dark, in order to reach the winding-stairs. I found them at last, and descended, half falling, half gliding. There was no one below; the door was only latched, and I breathed more freely when I was in the street, out of the uneasy atmosphere of the house. Spurred on by fear, I ran to my dwelling, and buried myself in the pillow of my bed, in order to forget the horrid crime I had committed. But sleep fled my eyelids, and soon morning admonished me again to collect myself. It seemed probable to me, that the man who had led me to this villainous deed, as it now appeared to me, would not denounce me. I immediately resolved to attend to my business in my shop, and to put on as careless an air as possible. But, alas! a new misfortune, which I now for the first time observed, augmented my sorrow. My cap and girdle, as also my knives, were missing; and I knew not whether they had been left in the chamber of the dead, or lost during my flight. Alas! the former seemed more probable, and they could discover in me the murderer.
I opened my shop at the usual time; a neighbor stepped in, as was his custom, being a communicative man. “Ah! what say you to the horrid deed,” he cried, “that was committed last night?” I started as if I knew nothing. “How! know you not that with which the whole city is filled? Know you not that last night, the fairest flower in Florence, Bianca, the daughter of the Governor, was murdered? Ah! only yesterday I saw her walking happily through the streets with her bridegroom, for to-day she would have had her nuptial festival!”
Every word of my neighbor was a dagger to my heart; and how often returned my torments! for each of my customers told me the story, one more frightfully than another; yet not one could tell it half so horribly as it had seemed to me. About mid-day, an officer of justice unexpectedly walked into my shop, and asked me to clear it of the bystanders.
“Signor Zaleukos,” said he, showing me the articles I had lost, “do these things belong to you?” I reflected whether I should not entirely disown them; but when I saw through the half-opened door, my landlord and several acquaintances, who could readily testify against me, I determined not to make the matter worse by a falsehood, and acknowledged the articles exhibited as my own. The officer told me to follow him, and conducted me to a spacious building, which I soon recognised as the prison. Then, a little farther on, he showed me into an apartment.
My situation was terrible, as I reflected on it in my solitude. The thought of having committed a murder, even against my wish, returned again and again. Moreover, I could not conceal from myself that the glance of the gold had dazzled my senses; otherwise I would not have fallen so blindly into the snare.
Two hours after my arrest, I was led from my chamber, and after descending several flights of stairs, entered a spacious saloon. Around a long table hung with black, were seated twelve men, mostly gray with age. Along the side of the room, benches were arranged, on which were seated the first people of Florence. In the gallery, which was built quite high, stood the spectators, closely crowded together. As soon as I reached the black table, a man with a gloomy, sorrowful air arose—it was the Governor. He told the audience that, as a father, he could not judge impartially in this matter, and that he, for this occasion, would surrender his seat to the oldest of the senators. The latter was a gray-headed man, of at least ninety years. He arose, stooping beneath the weight of age; his temples were covered with thin white hair, but his eyes still burned brightly, and his voice was strong and steady. He began by asking me whether I confessed the murder. I entreated his attention, and with dauntless, distinct voice, related what I had done and all that I knew. I observed that the Governor during my recital turned first pale, then red, and when I concluded, became furious. “How, wretch!” he cried out to me, “wishest thou thus to lay upon another, the crime thy avarice has committed?”
The Senator rebuked him for his interruption, after having of his own free will resigned his right; moreover, that it was not so clear, that I had done the deed through avarice, for according to his own testimony, nothing had been taken from the corpse. Yes, he went still further; he told the Governor that he must give an account of his daughter’s early life, for in this way only could one conclude whether I had told the truth or not. Immediately he closed the court for that day, for the purpose, as he said, of consulting the papers of the deceased, which the Governor was to give him. I was carried back to my prison, where I passed a sorrowful day, constantly occupied with the ardent hope, that they would in some way discover the connection between the deceased and the Red-mantle.
Full of hope, I proceeded the next day to the justice-hall. Several letters lay upon the table; the old Senator asked whether they were of my writing. I looked at them, and found that they were by the same hand as both the letters that I had received. This I disclosed to the Senator; but he seemed to give but little weight to it, answering that I must have written both, for the name subscribed was unquestionably a Z, the initial of my name. The letters, however, contained menaces against the deceased, and warnings against the marriage which she was on the point of consummating. The Governor seemed to have imparted something strange and untrue, with respect to my person; for I was treated this day with more suspicion and severity. For my justification, I appealed to the papers, which would be found in my room, but I was informed that search had been made and nothing found. Thus, at the close of the court, vanished all my hope; and when, on the third day, I was led again to the hall, the judgment was read aloud, that I was convicted of a premeditated murder, and sentenced to death. To such extremity had I come; forsaken by all that was dear to me on earth, far from my native land, innocent and in the bloom of my years, I was to die by the axe!
On the evening of this terrible day which had decided my fate, I was seated in my lonely dungeon, my hopes past, my thoughts seriously turned upon death, when the door of my prison opened, and a man entered who regarded me long in silence.
“Do I see you again, in this situation, Zaleukos?” he began. By the dim light of my lamp I had not recognised him, but the sound of his voice awoke within me old recollections. It was Valetty, one of the few friends I had made during my studies at Paris. He said that he had casually come to Florence, where his father, a distinguished man, resided; he had heard of my story, and come to see me once more, to inquire with his own lips, how I could have been guilty of such an awful crime. I told him the whole history: he seemed lost in wonder, and conjured me to tell him, my only friend, all the truth, and not to depart with a lie upon my tongue. I swore to him with the most solemn oath, that I had spoken the truth; and that no other guilt could be attached to me, than that, having been blinded by the glance of the gold, I had not seen the improbability of the Stranger’s story. “Then did you not know Bianca?” asked he. I assured him that I had never seen her. Valetty thereupon told me that there was a deep mystery in the matter; that the Governor in great haste had urged my condemnation, and that a report was current among the people, that I had known Bianca for a long time, and had murdered her out of revenge for her intended marriage with another. I informed him that all this was probably true of the Red-mantle, but that I could not prove his participation in the deed. Valetty embraced me, weeping, and promised me to do all that he could; to save my life, if nothing more. I had not much hope; nevertheless, I knew that my friend was a wise man, and well acquainted with the laws, and that he would do all in his power to preserve me.
Two long days was I in suspense; at length Valetty appeared. “I bring consolation, though even that is attended with sorrow. You shall live and be free, but with the loss of a hand!”
Overjoyed, I thanked my friend for my life. He told me that the Governor had been inexorable, and would not once look into the matter: that at length, however, rather than appear unjust, he had agreed, if a similar case could be found in the annals of Florentine history, that my penalty should be regulated by the punishment that was then inflicted. He and his father had searched, day and night, in the old books, and had at length found a case similar in every respect to mine; the sentence there ran thus:—
“He shall have his left hand cut off; his goods shall be confiscated, and he himself banished forever!”
Such now was my sentence, also, and I was to prepare for the painful hour that awaited me. I will not bring before your eyes the frightful moment, in which, at the open market-place, I laid my hand upon the block; in which my own blood in thick streams flowed over me!
Valetty took me to his house until I had recovered, and then generously supplied me with money for my journey, for all that I had so laboriously acquired was confiscated to Justice. I went from Florence to Sicily, and thence, by the first ship I could find, to Constantinople. My hopes, which rested on the sum of money I had left with my friend, were not disappointed. I proposed that I should live with him—how astonished was I, when he asked why I occupied not my own house! He told me that a strange man had, in my name, bought a house in the quarter of the Greeks, and told the neighbors that I would soon, myself, return. I immediately proceeded to it with my friend, and was joyfully received by all my old acquaintances. An aged merchant handed me a letter which the man who purchased for me had left. I read:—
“Zaleukos! two hands stand ready to work unceasingly, that thou mayest not feel the loss of one. That house which thou seest and all therein are thine, and every year shalt thou receive so much, that thou shalt be among the rich of thy nation. Mayest thou forgive one who is more unhappy than thyself!”
I could guess who was the writer, and the merchant told me, in answer to my inquiry that it was a man covered with a red cloak, whom he had taken for a Frenchman. I knew enough to convince me that the Unknown was not entirely devoid of generous feeling. In my new house I found all arranged in the best style; a shop, moreover, full of wares, finer than any I had ever had. Ten years have elapsed since then; more in compliance with ancient custom, than because it is necessary, do I continue to travel in foreign lands for purposes of trade, but the land which was so fatal to me I have never seen since. Every year I receive a thousand pieces of gold; but although it rejoices me to know that this Unfortunate is so noble, still can his money never remove woe from my soul, for there lives forever the heart-rending image of the murdered Bianca!

Thus ended the story of Zaleukos, the Grecian merchant. With great interest had the others listened; the stranger, in particular, seemed to be wrapt up in it: more than once he had drawn a deep sigh, and Muley looked as if he had had tears in his eyes. No one spoke for some time after the recital.
“And hate you not the Unknown, who so basely cost you a noble member of your body, and even put your life in danger?” inquired Selim.
“Perhaps there were hours at first,” answered the Greek, “in which my heart accused him before God, of having brought this misfortune upon me, and embittered my life; but I found consolation in the religion of my fathers, which commanded me to love my enemies. Moreover, he probably is more unhappy than myself.”
“You are a noble man!” exclaimed Selim, cordially pressing the hand of the Greek.
The leader of the escort, however, here interrupted their conversation. He came with a troubled air into the tent, and told them that they could not give themselves up to repose, for this was the place in which Caravans were usually attacked, and his guards imagined they had seen several horsemen in the distance.
The merchants were confounded at this intelligence. Selim, the stranger, however, expressed wonder at their alarm, saying they were so well escorted they need not fear a troop of Arabian robbers.
“Yes, sir,” rejoined to him the leader of the guard; “were he only a common outlaw, we could compose ourselves to rest without anxiety; but for some time back, the frightful Orbasan has shown himself again, and it is well to be upon our guard.”
The stranger inquired who this Orbasan was, and Achmet, the old merchant, answered him:—
“Various rumors are current among the people with respect to this wonderful man. Some hold him to be a supernatural being, because, with only five or six men, he has frequently fallen upon a whole encampment; others regard him as a bold Frenchman, whom misfortune has driven into this region: out of all this, however, thus much alone is certain, that he is an abandoned robber and highwayman.”
“That can you not prove,” answered Lezah, one of the merchants. “Robber as he is, he is still a noble man, and such has he shown himself to my brother, as I can relate to you. He has formed his whole band of well-disciplined men, and as long as he marches through the desert, no other band ventures to show itself. Moreover, he robs not as others, but only exacts a tribute from the caravans; whoever willingly pays this, proceeds without further danger, for Orbasan is lord of the wilderness!”
Thus did the travellers converse together in the tent; the guards, however, who were stationed around the resting-place, began to become uneasy. A tolerably large band of armed horsemen showed themselves at the distance of half a league. They appeared to be riding straight to the encampment; one of the guard came into the tent, to inform them that they would probably be attacked.

The merchants consulted among themselves as to what they should do, whether to march against them, or await the attack. Achmet and the two elder merchants inclined to the latter course; the fiery Muley, however, and Zaleukos desired the former, and summoned the stranger to their assistance. He, however, quietly drew forth from his girdle a little blue cloth spangled with red stars, bound it upon a lance, and commanded one of the slaves to plant it in front of the tent: he would venture his life upon it, he said, that the horsemen, when they saw this signal, would quietly march back again. Muley trusted not the result; still the slave put out the lance in front of the tent. Meanwhile all in the camp had seized their weapons, and were looking upon the horsemen in eager expectation. The latter, however, appeared to have espied the signal; they suddenly swerved from their direct course towards the encampment, and, in a large circle, moved off to the side.
Struck with wonder, the travellers stood some moments, gazing alternately at the horsemen and the stranger. The latter stood in front of the tent quite indifferently, as though nothing had happened, looking upon the plain before him. At last Muley broke the silence.
“Who art thou, mighty stranger,” he exclaimed, “that restrainest with a glance the wild hordes of the desert?”
“You rate my art higher than it deserves,” answered Selim Baruch. “I observed this signal when I fled from captivity; what it means, I know not—only this much I know, that whoever travels with this sign, is under great protection.”
The merchants thanked the stranger, and called him their preserver; indeed, the number of the robbers was so great, that the Caravan could not, probably, for any length of time, have offered an effectual resistance.
With lighter hearts they now gave themselves to sleep; and when the sun began to sink, and the evening wind to pass over the sand-plain, they struck their tents, and marched on. The next day they halted safely, only one day’s journey from the entrance of the desert. When the travellers had once more collected in the large tent, Lezah, the merchant, took up the discourse.
“I told you, yesterday, that the dreaded Orbasan was a noble man; permit me to prove it to you, to-day, by the relation of my brother’s adventure. My father was Cadi of Acara. He had three children; I was the eldest, my brother and sister being much younger than myself. When I was twenty years old, a brother of my father took me under his protection; he made me heir to his property, on condition that I should remain with him until his death. He however had reached an old age, so that I only returned to my native land two years ago, having known nothing, before, of the misfortune which had meanwhile fallen upon my family, and how Allah had turned it to advantage.”


FATIMA’S DELIVERANCE

MY brother Mustapha and my sister Fatima were almost of the same age; the former was at most but two years older. They loved each other fervently, and did in concert, all that could lighten, for our suffering father, the burden of his old age. On Fatima’s seventeenth birthday, my brother prepared a festival. He invited all her companions, and set before them a choice banquet in the gardens of our father, and, towards evening, proposed to them to take a little sail upon the sea, in a boat which he had hired, and adorned in grand style. Fatima and her companions agreed with joy, for the evening was fine, and the city, particularly when viewed by evening from the sea, promised a magnificent prospect. The girls, however, were so well pleased upon the bark, that they continually entreated my brother to go farther out upon the sea. Mustapha, however, yielded reluctantly, because a Corsair had been seen, for several days back, in that vicinity.
Not far from the city, a promontory projected into the sea; thither the maidens were anxious to go, in order to see the sun sink into the water. Having rowed thither, they beheld a boat occupied by armed men. Anticipating no good, my brother commanded the oarsmen to turn the vessel, and make for land. His apprehensions seemed, indeed, to be confirmed, for the boat quickly approached that of my brother, and getting ahead of it, (for it had more rowers,) ran between it and the land. The young girls, moreover, when they knew the danger to which they were exposed, sprang up with cries and lamentations: in vain Mustapha sought to quiet them, in vain enjoined upon them to be still, lest their running to and fro should upset the vessel. It was of no avail; and when, in consequence of the proximity of the other boat, all ran upon the further side, it was upset.
Meanwhile, they had observed from the land the approach of the strange boat, and, inasmuch as, for some time back, they had been in anxiety on account of Corsairs, their suspicions were excited, and several boats put off from the land to their assistance: but they only came in time to pick up the drowning. In the confusion, the hostile boat escaped. In both barks, however, which had taken in those who were preserved, they were uncertain whether all had been saved. They approached each other, and, alas! found that my sister and one of her companions were missing; at the same time, in their number a stranger was discovered, who was known to none. In answer to Mustapha’s threats, he confessed that he belonged to the hostile ship, which was lying at anchor two miles to the eastward, and that his companions had left him behind in their hasty flight, while he was engaged in assisting to pick up the maidens; moreover, he said he had seen two taken on board their boat.
The grief of my old father was without bounds, but Mustapha also was afflicted unto death, for not only had his beloved sister been lost, and did he accuse himself of having been the cause of her misfortune, but, also, her companion who had shared it with her, had been promised to him by her parents as his wife; still had he not dared to avow it to our father, because her family was poor, and of low descent. My father, however, was a stern man; as soon as his sorrow had subsided a little, he called Mustapha before him, and thus spake to him:—
“Thy folly has deprived me of the consolation of my old age, and the joy of my eyes. Go! I banish thee forever from my sight! I curse thee and thine offspring—and only when thou shalt restore to me my Fatima, shall thy head be entirely free from a father’s execrations!”
This my poor brother had not expected; already, before this, he had determined to go in search of his sister and her friend, after having asked the blessing of his father upon his efforts, and now that father had sent him forth into the world, laden with his curse. As, however, his former grief had bowed him down, so this consummation of misfortune, which he had not deserved, tended to steel his mind. He went to the imprisoned pirate, and, demanding whither the ship was bound, learned that she carried on a trade in slaves, and usually had a great sale thereof in Balsora.
On his return to the house, in order to prepare for his journey, the anger of his father seemed to have subsided a little, for he sent him a purse full of gold, to support him during his travels. Mustapha, thereupon, in tears took leave of the parents of Zoraida, (for so his affianced was called,) and set out upon the route to Balsora.
Mustapha travelled by land, because from our little city there was no ship that went direct to Balsora. He was obliged, therefore, to use all expedition, in order not to arrive too long after the sea-robbers. Having a good horse and no luggage, he hoped to reach this city by the end of the sixth day. On the evening of the fourth, however, as he was riding all alone upon his way, three men came suddenly upon him. Having observed that they were well-armed and powerful men, and sought his money and his horse, rather than his life, he cried out that he would yield himself to them. They dismounted, and tied his feet together under his horse; then they placed him in their midst, and, without a word spoken, trotted quickly away with him; one of them having seized his bridle.
Mustapha gave himself up to a feeling of gloomy despair; the curse of his father seemed already to be undergoing its accomplishment on the unfortunate one, and how could he hope to save his sister and Zoraida, should he, robbed of all his means, even be able to devote his poor life to their deliverance? Mustapha and his silent companions might have ridden about an hour, when they entered a little valley. The vale was enclosed by lofty trees; a soft, dark-green turf, and a stream which ran swiftly through its midst, invited to repose. In this place were pitched from fifteen to twenty tents, to the stakes of which were fastened camels and fine horses: from one of these tents distinctly sounded the melody of a guitar, blended with two fine manly voices. It seemed to my brother as if people who had chosen so blithesome a resting-place, could have no evil intentions towards himself; and accordingly, without apprehension, he obeyed the summons of his conductors, who had unbound his feet, and made signs to him to follow. They led him into a tent which was larger than the rest, and on the inside was magnificently fitted up. Splendid cushions embroidered with gold, woven carpets, gilded censers, would elsewhere have bespoken opulence and respectability, but here seemed only the booty of a robber band. Upon one of the cushions an old and small-sized man was reclining: his countenance was ugly; a dark-brown and shining skin, a disgusting expression around his eyes, and a mouth of malicious cunning, combined to render his whole appearance odious. Although this man sought to put on a commanding air, still Mustapha soon perceived that not for him was the tent so richly adorned, and the conversation of his conductors seemed to confirm him in his opinion.
“Where is the Mighty?” inquired they of the little man.
“He is out upon a short hunt,” was the answer; “but he has commissioned me to attend to his affairs.”
“That has he not wisely done,” rejoined one of the robbers; “for it must soon be determined whether this dog is to die or be ransomed, and that the Mighty knows better than thou.”
Being very sensitive in all that related to his usurped dignity, the little man, raising himself, stretched forward in order to reach the other’s ear with the extremity of his hand, for he seemed desirous of revenging himself by a blow; but when he saw that his attempt was fruitless, he set about abusing him (and indeed the others did not remain much in his debt) to such a degree, that the tent resounded with their strife. Thereupon, of a sudden, the tent-door opened, and in walked a tall, stately man, young and handsome as a Persian prince. His garments and weapons, with the exception of a richly-mounted poniard and gleaming sabre, were plain and simple; his serious eye, however, and his whole appearance, demanded respect without exciting fear.
“Who is it that dares to engage in strife within my tent?” exclaimed he, as they started back aghast. For a long time deep stillness prevailed, till at last one of those who had captured Mustapha, related to him how it had begun. Thereupon the countenance of “the Mighty,” as they had called him, seemed to grow red with passion.
“When would I have placed thee, Hassan, over my concerns?” he cried, in frightful accents, to the little man. The latter, in his fear, shrunk until he seemed even smaller than before, and crept towards the door of the tent. One step of the Mighty was sufficient to send him through the entrance with a long singular bound. As soon as the little man had vanished, the three led Mustapha before the master of the tent, who had meanwhile reclined upon the cushion.
“Here bring we thee him, whom thou commandedst us to take.” He regarded the prisoner for some time, and then said, “Bashaw of Sulieika, thine own conscience will tell thee why thou standest before Orbasan.” When my brother heard this, he bowed low and answered:—
“My lord, you appear to labor under a mistake; I am a poor unfortunate, not the Bashaw, whom you seek.” At this all were amazed; the master of the tent, however, said:—
“Dissimulation can help you little, for I will summon the people who know you well.” He commanded them to bring in Zuleima. An old woman was led into the tent, who, on being asked whether in my brother she recognised the Bashaw of Sulieika, answered:—
“Yes, verily! And I swear by the grave of the Prophet, it is the Bashaw, and no other!”
“Seest thou, wretch, that thy dissimulation has become as water?” cried out the Mighty in a furious tone. “Thou art too pitiful for me to stain my good dagger with thy blood, but to-morrow, when the sun is up, will I bind thee to the tail of my horse, and gallop with thee through the woods until they divide behind the hills of Sulieika!” Then sank my poor brother’s courage within him.
“It is my cruel father’s curse, that urges me to an ignominious death,” exclaimed he, weeping; “and thou, too, art lost, sweet sister, and thou, Zoraida!”
“Thy dissimulation helps thee not,” said one of the robbers, as he bound his hands behind his back. “Come, out of the tent with thee! for the Mighty is biting his lips, and feeling for his dagger. If thou wouldst live another night, bestir thyself!”
Just as the robbers were leading my brother from the tent, they met three of their companions, who were also pushing a captive before them. They entered with him. “Here bring we the Bashaw, as thou hast commanded,” said they, conducting the prisoner before the cushion of the Mighty. While they were so doing, my brother had an opportunity of examining him, and was struck with surprise at the remarkable resemblance which this man bore to himself; the only difference being, that he was of more gloomy aspect, and had a black beard. The Mighty seemed much astonished at the resemblance of the two captives.
“Which of you is the right one?” he asked, looking alternately at Mustapha and the other.
“If thou meanest the Bashaw of Sulieika,” answered the latter in a haughty tone, “I am he!”
The Mighty regarded him for a long time with his grave, terrible eye, and then silently motioned to them to lead him off. This having been done, he approached my brother, severed his bonds with his dagger, and invited him by signs to sit upon the cushion beside him. “It grieves me, stranger,” he said, “that I took you for this villain. It has happened, however, by some mysterious interposition of Providence, which placed you in the hands of my companions, at the very hour in which the destruction of this wretch was ordained.”
Mustapha, thereupon, entreated him only for permission to pursue his journey immediately, for this delay might cost him much. The Mighty asked what business it could be that required such haste, and, when Mustapha had told him all, he persuaded him to spend that night in his tent, and allow his horse some rest; and promised the next morning to show him a route which would bring him to Balsora in a day and a half. My brother consented, was sumptuously entertained, and slept soundly till morning in the robber’s tent.
Upon awaking, he found himself all alone in the tent, but, before the entrance, heard several voices in conversation, which seemed to belong to the swarthy little man and the bandit-chief. He listened awhile, and to his horror heard the little man eagerly urging the other to slay the stranger, since, if he were let go, he could betray them all. Mustapha immediately perceived that the little man hated him, for having been the cause of his rough treatment the day before. The Mighty seemed to be reflecting a moment.
“No,” said he; “he is my guest, and the laws of hospitality are with me sacred: moreover, he does not look like one that would betray us.”
Having thus spoken, he threw back the tent-cover, and walked in. “Peace be with thee, Mustapha!” he said: “let us taste the morning-drink, and then prepare thyself for thy journey.” He offered my brother a cup of sherbet, and after they had drunk, they saddled their horses, and Mustapha mounted, with a lighter heart, indeed, than when he entered the vale. They had soon turned their backs upon the tents, and took a broad path, which led into the forest. The Mighty informed my brother, that this Bashaw whom they had captured in the chase, had promised them that they should remain undisturbed within his jurisdiction; but some weeks before, he had taken one of their bravest men, and had him hung, after the most terrible tortures. He had waited for him a long time, and to-day he must die. Mustapha ventured not to say a word in opposition, for he was glad to have escaped himself with a whole skin.
At the entrance of the forest, the Mighty checked his horse, showed Mustapha the way, and gave him his hand with these words: “Mustapha, thou becamest in a strange way the guest of the robber Orbasan. I will not ask thee not to betray what thou hast seen and heard. Thou hast unjustly endured the pains of death, and I owe thee a recompense. Take this dagger as a remembrance, and when thou hast need of help, send it to me, and I will hasten to thy assistance. This purse thou wilt perhaps need upon thy journey.”
My brother thanked him for his generosity; he took the dagger, but refused the purse. Orbasan, however, pressed once again his hand, let the money fall to the ground, and galloped with the speed of the wind into the forest. Mustapha, seeing that he could not overtake him, dismounted to secure the purse, and was astonished at the great magnanimity of his host, for it contained a large sum of gold. He thanked Allah for his deliverance, commended the generous robber to his mercy, and again started, with fresh courage, upon the route to Balsora.

Lezah paused, and looked inquiringly at Achmet, the old merchant.
“No! if it be so,” said the latter, “then will I gladly correct my opinion of Orbasan; for indeed he acted nobly towards thy brother.”
“He behaved like a brave Mussulman,” exclaimed Muley; “but I hope thou hast not here finished thy story, for, as it seems to me, we are all eager to hear still further, how it went with thy brother, and whether he succeeded in rescuing thy sister and the fair Zoraida.”
“I will willingly proceed,” rejoined Lezah, “if it be not tiresome to you; for my brother’s history is, throughout, full of the most wonderful adventures.”

About the middle of the seventh day after his departure, Mustapha entered the gate of Balsora. As soon as he had arrived at a caravansary, he inquired whether the slave-market, which was held here every year, had opened; but received the startling answer, that he had come two days too late. His informer deplored his tardiness, telling him that on the last day of the market, two female slaves had arrived, of such great beauty as to attract to themselves the eyes of all the merchants.
He inquired more particularly as to their appearance, and there was no doubt in his mind, that they were the unfortunate ones of whom he was in search. Moreover, he learned that the man who had purchased them both, was called Thiuli-Kos, and lived forty leagues from Balsora, an illustrious and wealthy, but quite old man, who had been in his early years Capudan-Bashaw of the Sultan, but had now settled down into private life with the riches he had acquired.
Mustapha was, at first, on the point of remounting his horse with all possible speed, in order to overtake Thiuli-Kos, who could scarcely have had a day’s start; but when he reflected that, as a single man, he could not prevail against the powerful traveller, could still less rescue from him his prey, he set about reflecting for another plan, and soon hit upon one. His resemblance to the Bashaw of Sulieika, which had almost been fatal to him, suggested to him the thought of going to the house of Thiuli-Kos under this name, and, in that way, making an attempt for the deliverance of the two unfortunate maidens. Accordingly he hired attendants and horses, in which the money of Orbasan opportunely came to his assistance, furnished himself and his servants with splendid garments, and set out in the direction of Thiuli’s castle. After five days he arrived in its vicinity. It was situated in a beautiful plain, and was surrounded on all sides by lofty walls, which were but slightly overtopped by the structure itself. When Mustapha had arrived quite near, he dyed his hair and beard black, and stained his face with the juice of a plant, which gave it a brownish color, exactly similar to that of the Bashaw. From this place he sent forward one of his attendants to the castle, and bade him ask a night’s lodging, in the name of the Bashaw of Sulieika. The servant soon returned in company with four finely-attired slaves, who took Mustapha’s horse by the bridle, and led him into the court-yard. There they assisted him to dismount, and four others escorted him up a wide marble staircase, into the presence of Thiuli.
The latter personage, an old, robust man, received my brother respectfully, and had set before him the best that his castle could afford. After the meal, Mustapha gradually turned the conversation upon the new slaves; whereupon, Thiuli praised their beauty, but expressed regret because they were so sorrowful; nevertheless he believed that would pass by after a time. My brother was much delighted at his reception, and, with hope beating high in his bosom, lay down to rest.
He might, perhaps, have been sleeping an hour, when he was awakened by the rays of a lamp, which fell dazzlingly upon his eyes. When he had raised himself up, he believed himself dreaming, for there before him stood the very same little, swarthy fellow of Orbasan’s tent, a lamp in his hand, his wide mouth distended with a disgusting laugh. Mustapha pinched himself in the arm, and pulled his nose, in order to see if he were really awake, but the figure remained as before.
“What wishest thou by my bed?” exclaimed Mustapha, recovering from his amazement.
“Do not disquiet yourself so much, my friend,” answered the little man. “I made a good guess as to the motive that brought you hither. Although your worthy countenance was still well remembered by me, nevertheless, had I not with my own hand assisted to hang the Bashaw, you might, perhaps, have deceived even me. Now, however, I am here to propose a question.”
“First of all, tell me why you came hither,” interrupted Mustapha, full of resentment at finding himself detected.
“That I will explain to you,” rejoined the other: “I could not put up with the Mighty any longer, and therefore ran away; but you, Mustapha, were properly the cause of our quarrel, and so you must give me your sister to wife, and I will help you in your flight; give her not, and I will go to my new master, and tell him something of our new Bashaw.”
Mustapha was beside himself with fear and anger; at the very moment when he thought he had arrived at the happy accomplishment of his wishes, must this wretch come, and frustrate them all! It was the only way to carry his plan into execution—he must slay the little monster: with one bound, he sprang from the bed upon him; but the other, who might perhaps have anticipated something of the kind, let the lamp fall, which was immediately extinguished, and rushed forth in the dark, crying vehemently for help.
Now was the time for decisive action; the maids he was obliged, for the moment, to abandon, and attend only to his own safety: accordingly, he approached the window, to see if he could not spring from it. It was a tolerable distance from the ground, and on the other side stood a lofty wall, which he would have to surmount. Reflecting, he stood by the window until he heard many voices approaching his chamber: already were they at the door, when seizing desperately his dagger, and garments, he let himself down from the window. The fall was hard, but he felt that no bone was broken; immediately he sprang up, and ran to the wall which surrounded the court. This, to the astonishment of his pursuers, he mounted, and soon found himself at liberty. He ran on until he came to a little forest, where he sank down exhausted. Here he reflected on what was to be done; his horses and attendants he was obliged to leave behind, but the money, which he had placed in his girdle, he had saved.
His inventive genius, however, soon pointed him to another means of deliverance. He walked through the wood until he arrived at a village, where for a small sum he purchased a horse, with the help of which, in a short time, he reached a city. There he inquired for a physician, and was directed to an old experienced man. On this one he prevailed, by a few gold pieces, to furnish him with a medicine to produce a death-like sleep, which, by means of another, might be instantaneously removed. Having obtained this, he purchased a long false beard, a black gown, and various boxes and retorts, so that he could readily pass for a travelling physician; these articles he placed upon an ass, and rode back to the castle of Thiuli-Kos. He was certain, this time, of not being recognised, for the beard disfigured him so that he scarcely knew himself.
Arrived in the vicinity of the castle, he announced himself as the physician Chakamankabudibaba, and matters turned out as he had expected. The splendor of the name procured him extraordinary favor with the old fool, who invited him to table. Chakamankabudibaba appeared before Thiuli, and, having conversed with him scarcely an hour, the old man resolved that all his female slaves should submit to the examination of the wise physician. The latter could scarcely conceal his joy at the idea of once more beholding his beloved sister, and with palpitating heart followed Thiuli, who conducted him to his seraglio. They reached an unoccupied room, which was beautifully furnished.
“Chambaba, or whatever thou mayest be called, my good physician,” said Thiuli-Kos, “look once at that hole in the wall; thence shall each of my slaves stretch forth her arm, and thou canst feel whether the pulse betoken sickness or health.”
Answer as he might, Mustapha could not arrange it so that he might see them; nevertheless, Thiuli agreed to tell him, each time, the usual health of the one he was examining. Thiuli drew forth a long list from his girdle, and began, with loud voice, to call out, one by one, the names of his slaves; whereupon, each time, a hand came forth from the wall, and the physician felt the pulse. Six had been read off, and declared entirely well, when Thiuli, for the seventh called Fatima, and a small white hand slipped forth from the wall. Trembling with joy, Mustapha grasped it, and with an important air pronounced her seriously ill. Thiuli became very anxious, and commanded his wise Chakamankabudibaba straightway to prescribe some medicine for her. The physician left the room, and wrote a little scroll:
“Fatima, I will preserve thee, if thou canst make up thy mind to take a draught, which for two days will make thee dead; nevertheless, I possess the means of restoring thee to life. If thou wilt, then only return answer, that this liquid has been of no assistance, and it will be to me a token that thou agreest.”
In a moment he returned to the room, where Thiuli had remained. He brought with him an innocent drink, felt the pulse of the sick Fatima once more, pushed the note beneath her bracelet, and then handed her the liquid through the opening in the wall. Thiuli seemed to be in great anxiety on Fatima’s account, and postponed the examination of the rest to a more fitting opportunity. As he left the room with Mustapha, he addressed him in sorrowful accents:
“Chadibaba, tell me plainly, what thinkest thou of Fatima’s illness?”
My brother answered with a deep sigh: “Ah, sir, may the Prophet give you consolation! she has a slow fever, which may, perhaps, cost her life!”
Then burned Thiuli’s anger: “What sayest thou, cursed dog of a physician? She, for whom I gave two thousand gold pieces—shall she die like a cow? Know, if thou preservest her not, I will chop off thine head!”
My brother immediately saw that he had made a misstep, and again inspired Thiuli with hope. While they were yet conversing, a black slave came from the seraglio to tell the physician, that the drink had been of no assistance.
“Put forth all thy skill, Chakamdababelda, or whatever thy name may be; I will pay thee what thou askest!” cried out Thiuli-Kos, well-nigh howling with sorrow, at the idea of losing so much gold.
“I will give her a potion, which will put her out of all danger,” answered the physician.
“Yes, yes!—give it her,” sobbed the old Thiuli.
With joyful heart Mustapha went to bring his soporific, and having given it to the black slave, and shown him how much it was necessary to take for a dose, he went to Thiuli, and, telling him he must procure some medicinal herbs from the sea, hastened through the gate. On the shore, which was not far from the castle, he removed his false garments, and cast them into the water, where they floated merrily around; concealing himself, however, in a thicket, he awaited the night, and then stole softly to the burying-place of Thiuli’s castle.
Hardly an hour had Mustapha been absent, when they brought Thiuli the intelligence that his slave Fatima was in the agonies of death. He sent them to the sea-coast to bring the physician back with all speed, but his messengers returned alone, with the news that the poor physician had fallen into the water, and was drowned; that they had espied his black gown floating upon the surface, and that now and then his large beard peeped forth from amid the billows. Thiuli seeing now no help, cursed himself and the whole world; plucked his beard, and dashed his head against the wall. But all this was of no use, for soon Fatima gave up the ghost, in the arms of her companions. When the unfortunate man heard the news of her death, he commanded them quickly to make a coffin, for he could not tolerate a dead person in his house; and bade them bear forth the corpse to the place of burial. The carriers brought in the coffin, but quickly set it down and fled, for they heard sighs and sobs among the other piles.
Mustapha, who, concealed behind the coffins, had inspired the attendants with such terror, came forth and lighted a lamp, which he had brought for that purpose. Then he drew out a vial which contained the life-restoring medicine, and lifted the lid of Fatima’s coffin. But what amazement seized him, when by the light of the lamp, strange features met his gaze! Neither my sister, nor Zoraida, but an entire stranger, lay in the coffin! It was some time before he could recover from this new stroke of destiny; at last, however, compassion triumphed over anger. He opened the vial, and administered the liquid. She breathed—she opened her eyes—and seemed for some time to be reflecting where she was. At length, recalling all that had happened, she rose from the coffin, and threw herself, sobbing, at Mustapha’s feet.
“How may I thank thee, excellent being,” she exclaimed, “for having freed me from my frightful prison?” Mustapha interrupted her expressions of gratitude by inquiring, how it happened that she, and not his sister Fatima, had been preserved. The maiden looked in amazement.
“Now is my deliverance explained, which was before incomprehensible,” answered she. “Know that in this castle I am called Fatima, and it was to me thou gavest thy note, and the preserving-drink.”
My brother entreated her to give him intelligence of his sister and Zoraida, and learned that they were both in the castle, but, according to Thiuli’s custom, had received different names; they were now called Mirza and Nurmahal. When Fatima, the rescued slave, saw that my brother was so cast down by this failure of his enterprise, she bade him take courage, and promised to show him means whereby he could still deliver both the maidens. Aroused by this thought, Mustapha was filled with new hope, and besought her to point out to him the way.
“Only five months,” said she, “have I been Thiuli’s slave; nevertheless, from the first, I have been continually meditating an escape; but for myself alone it was too difficult. In the inner court of the castle, you may have observed a fountain, which pours forth water from ten tubes; this fountain riveted my attention. I remembered in my father’s house to have seen a similar one, the water of which was led up through a spacious aqueduct. In order to learn whether this fountain was constructed in the same manner, I one day praised its magnificence to Thiuli, and inquired after its architect. ‘I myself built it,’ answered he, ‘and what thou seest here is still the smallest part; for the water comes hither into it from a brook at least a thousand paces off, flowing through a vaulted aqueduct, which is as high as a man. And all this have I myself planned.’ After hearing this, I often wished only for a moment to have a man’s strength, in order to roll away the stone from the side of the fountain; then could I have fled whither I would. The aqueduct now will I show to you; through it you can enter the castle by night, and set them free. Only you must have at least two men with you, in order to overpower the slaves which, by night, guard the seraglio.”
Thus she spoke, and my brother Mustapha, although twice disappointed already in his expectations, once again took courage, and hoped with Allah’s assistance to carry out the plan of the slave. He promised to conduct her in safety to her native land, if she would assist him in entering the castle. But one thought still troubled him, namely, where he could find two or three faithful assistants. Thereupon the dagger of Orbasan occurred to him, and the promise of the robber to hasten to his assistance, when he should stand in need of help, and he therefore started with Fatima from the burying-ground, to seek the chieftain.
In the same city where he had converted himself into a physician, with his last money he purchased a horse, and procured lodgings for Fatima, with a poor woman in the suburbs. He, however, hastened towards the mountain where he had first met Orbasan, and reached it in three days. He soon found the tent, and unexpectedly walked in before the chieftain, who welcomed him with friendly courtesy. He related to him his unsuccessful attempts, whereupon the grave Orbasan could not restrain himself from laughing a little now and then, particularly when he announced himself as the physician Chakamankabudibaba. At the treachery of the little man, however, he was furious; and swore, if he could find him, to hang him with his own hand. He assured my brother that he was ready to assist him the moment he should be sufficiently recovered from his ride. Accordingly, Mustapha remained that night again in the robber’s tent, and with the first morning-red they set out, Orbasan taking with him three of his bravest men, well mounted and armed. They rode rapidly, and in two days arrived at the little city, where Mustapha had left the rescued Fatima. Thence they rode on with her unto the forest, from which, at a little distance, they could see Thiuli’s castle; there they concealed themselves, to await the night. As soon as it was dark, guided by Fatima, they proceeded softly to the brook, where the aqueduct commenced, and soon found it. There they left Fatima and a servant with the horses, and prepared themselves for the descent: before they started, however, Fatima once more repeated, with precision, the directions she had given; namely, that, on emerging from the fountain into the inner court-yard, they would find a tower in each corner on the right and left; that inside the sixth gate from the right tower, they would find Fatima and Zoraida, guarded by two black slaves. Well provided with weapons and iron implements for forcing the doors, Mustapha, Orbasan, and the two other men, descended through the aqueduct; they sank, indeed, in water, up to the middle, but not the less vigorously on that account did they press forward.
In a half hour they arrived at the fountain, and immediately began to ply their tools. The wall was thick and firm, but could not long resist the united strength of the four men; they soon made a breach sufficiently large to allow them to slip through without difficulty. Orbasan was the first to emerge, and then assisted the others. Being now all in the court-yard, they examined the side of the castle which lay before them, in order to find the door which had been described. But they could not agree as to which it was, for on counting from the right tower to the left, they found one door which had been walled up, and they knew not whether Fatima had included this in her calculation. But Orbasan was not long in making up his mind: “My good sword will open to me this gate,” he exclaimed, advancing to the sixth, while the others followed him. They opened it, and found six black slaves lying asleep upon the floor; imagining that they had missed the object of their search, they were already softly drawing back, when a figure raised itself in the corner, and in well-known accents called for help. It was the little man of the robber-encampment. But ere the slaves knew what had taken place, Orbasan sprang upon the little man, tore his girdle in two, stopped his mouth, and bound his hands behind his back; then he turned to the slaves, some of whom were already half bound by Mustapha and the two others, and assisted in completely overpowering them. They presented their daggers to the breasts of the slaves, and asked where Nurmahal and Mirza were: they confessed that they were in the next chamber. Mustapha rushed into the room, and found Fatima and Zoraida awakened by the noise. They were not long in collecting their jewels and garments, and following my brother.
Meanwhile the two robbers proposed to Orbasan to carry off what they could find, but he forbade them, saying: “It shall never be told of Orbasan, that he enters houses by night, to steal gold.” Mustapha, and those he had preserved, quickly stepped into the aqueduct, whither Orbasan promised to follow them immediately. As soon as they had departed, the chieftain and one of the robbers led forth the little man into the court-yard; there, having fastened around his neck a silken cord, which they had brought for that purpose, they hung him on the highest point of the fountain. After having thus punished the treachery of the wretch, they also entered the aqueduct, and followed Mustapha. With tears the two maidens thanked their brave preserver, Orbasan; but he urged them in haste to their flight, for it was very probable that Thiuli-Kos would seek them in every direction.
With deep emotion, on the next day, did Mustapha and the rescued maidens part with Orbasan. Indeed, they never will forget him! Fatima, the freed slave, left us in disguise for Balsora, in order to take passage thence to her native land.
After a short and agreeable journey, my brother and his companions reached home. Delight at seeing them once more, almost killed my old father; the next day after their arrival, he gave a great festival, to which all the city was invited. Before a large assemblage of relations and friends, my brother had to relate his story, and with one voice they praised him and the noble robber.
When, however, Mustapha had finished, my father arose and led Zoraida to him. “Thus remove I,” said he with solemn voice, “the curse from thy head; take this maiden as the reward which thy unwearied courage has merited. Receive my fatherly blessing: and may there never be wanting to our city, men who, in brotherly love, in prudence, and bravery, may be thy equals!”

The Caravan had reached the end of the desert, and gladly did the travellers salute the green meadows, and thickly-leaved trees, of whose charms they had been deprived for so many days. In a lovely valley lay a caravansary, which they selected as their resting-place for the night; and though it offered but limited accommodations and refreshment, still was the whole company more happy and sociable than ever: for the thought of having passed through the dangers and hardships, with which a journey through the desert is ever accompanied, had opened every heart, and attuned their minds to jest and gayety. Muley, the young and merry merchant, went through a comic dance, and sang songs thereto, which elicited a laugh, even from Zaleukos, the serious Greek. But not content with having raised the spirits of his comrades by dance and merriment, he also gave them, in the best style, the story he had promised, and, as soon as he could recover breath from his gambols, began the following tale.


THE STORY OF LITTLE MUCK

IN Nicea, my beloved father-city, lived a man, whom people called “Little Muck.” Though at that time I was quite young, I can recollect him very well, particularly since, on one occasion, I was flogged almost to death, by my father, on his account. The Little Muck, even then, when I knew him, an old man, was nevertheless but three or four feet high: he had a singular figure, for his body, small and delicate as it was, carried a head much larger and thicker than that of others. He lived all alone in a large house, and even cooked for himself; moreover, it would not have been known in the city whether he was alive or dead, (for he went forth but once in four weeks,) had not every day, about the hour of noon, strong fumes come forth from the house. Nevertheless, in the evening he was often to be seen walking to and fro upon his roof; although, from the street, it seemed as if it were his head alone that was running around there.
I and my comrades were wicked fellows, who teased and ridiculed every one; accordingly, to us it was a holiday when the Little Muck went forth: on the appointed day we would assemble before his house, and wait for him to come out. When, then, the door opened, and at first the immense head and still larger turban peered forth, when the rest of the body followed covered with a small cloak which had been irregularly curtailed, with wide pantaloons, and a broad girdle in which hung a long dagger, so long that one could not tell whether Muck was fastened to the dagger, or the dagger to Muck—when in this guise he came forth, then would the air resound with our cries of joy; then would we fling our caps aloft, and dance round him, like mad. Little Muck, however, would salute us with a serious bow, and walk with long strides through the street, shuffling now and then his feet, for he wore large wide slippers, such as I have never elsewhere seen. We boys would run behind him, crying continually, “Little Muck! Little Muck!” We also had a droll little verse, which we would now and then sing in his honor; it ran thus:—

“Little Muck, oh Little Muck!
What a fine, brave dwarf art thou!
Livest in a house so tall;
Goest forth but once a month,
Mountain-headed, though so small.
Turn thyself but once, and look!
Run, and catch us, Little Muck.”

In this way had we often carried on our sport, and, to my shame, I must confess that I took the most wicked part in it, for I often plucked him by the mantle, and once trod from behind on his large slippers, so that he fell down. This was, at first, a source of the greatest amusement to me, but my laughter soon ceased when I saw the Little Muck go up to my father’s house; he walked straight in, and remained there some time. I concealed myself near the door, and saw Muck come forth again, escorted by my father, who respectfully shook his hand, and with many bows parted with him at the door. My mind was uneasy, and I remained some time in my concealment; at length, however, hunger, which I feared more than blows, drove me in, and ashamed and with downcast head, I walked in before my father.
“Thou hast, as I hear, insulted the good Muck,” said he with a very serious tone. “I will tell thee the history of this Muck, and then I am sure thou wilt ridicule him no more. But first, thou shalt receive thy allowance.” The allowance was five-and-twenty lashes, which he took care to count only too honestly. He thereupon took a long pipe-stem, unscrewed the amber mouthpiece, and beat me more severely than he had ever done before.
When the five-and-twenty were all done, he ordered me to attend, and told me the following story of Little Muck.

The father of Little Muck, who is properly called Mukrah, lived here in Nicea, a respectable, but poor man. He kept himself almost as retired as his son does now. The latter he could not endure, because he was ashamed of his dwarfish figure, and let him therefore grow up in perfect ignorance. When the Little Muck was still in his seventeenth year, a merry child, his father, a grave man, kept continually reproaching him, that he, who ought long before to have trodden down the shoes of infancy, was still so stupid and childish.
The old man, however, one day had a bad fall, from the effects of which he died, and Little Muck was left behind, poor and ignorant. His cruel relations, to whom the deceased owed more than he could pay, turned the poor fellow out of the house, and advised him to go forth into the world, and seek his fortune. Muck answered that he was all ready, only asking them for his father’s clothes, which they willingly granted him. His father had been a large, portly man, and the garments on that account did not fit him. Muck, however, soon hit upon an expedient; he cut off what was too long, and then put them on. He seemed, however, to have forgotten that he must also take from their width; hence the strange dress that he wears at the present day; the huge turban, the broad girdle, the wide breeches, the blue cloak, all these he has inherited from his father, and worn ever since. The long Damascus dagger of his father, too, he attached to his girdle, and seizing a little staff, set out from the door.
Gayly he wandered, the whole day, for he had set out to seek his fortune: if he saw upon the ground a potsherd shining in the sunlight, he took care to pick it up, in the belief that he could change it into a diamond of the first water; if he saw in the distance the cupola of a Mosque sparkling like fire, or the sea glittering like a mirror, he would hasten up, fully persuaded that he had arrived at fairy-land. But ah! these phantoms vanished as he approached, and too soon fatigue, and his stomach gnawed by hunger, convinced him that he was still in the land of mortals. In this way he travelled two days, in hunger and grief, and despaired of finding his fortune; the produce of the field was his only support, the hard earth his bed. On the morning of the third day, he espied a large city upon an eminence. Brightly shone the crescent upon her pinnacles, variegated flags waved over the roofs, and seemed to be beckoning Little Muck to themselves. In surprise he stood still, contemplating the city and the surrounding country.
“There at length will Little Muck find his fortune,” said he to himself, and in spite of his fatigue bounded in the air; “there or nowhere!” He collected all his strength, and walked towards the city. But although the latter seemed quite near, he could not reach it until mid-day, for his little limbs almost entirely refused him their assistance, and he was obliged to sit down to rest in the shade of a palm-tree. At last he reached the gate; he fixed the mantle jauntily, wound the turban still more tastily around his head, made the girdle broader, and arranged the dagger so as to fall still more obliquely: then, wiping the dust from his shoes, and seizing his cane, he marched bravely through the gate.
He had already wandered through a few streets, but nowhere did any door open to him, nowhere did any one exclaim, as he had anticipated: “Little Muck, come in and eat and drink, and rest thy little feet.”
He was looking very wistfully straight at a large fine house, when a window opened, and an old woman, putting out her head, exclaimed in a singing tone—

“Hither, come hither!
The porridge is here;
The table I’ve spread,
Come taste of my cheer.
Hither, come hither!
The porridge is hot;
Your neighbors bring with you,
To dip in the pot!”

The door opened, and Muck saw many dogs and cats walking in. For a moment he stood in doubt whether he should accept the invitation; at last, however, he took heart and entered the mansion. Before him proceeded a couple of genteel kittens, and he resolved to follow them, since they, perhaps, knew the way to the kitchen better than himself.
When Muck had ascended the steps, he met the same old woman who had looked forth from the window. With frowning air she asked what he wanted.
“Thou hast invited every one to thy porridge,” answered Little Muck, “and as I was very hungry, I came too.”
The old woman laughed, saying, “Whence come you then, strange fellow? The whole city knows that I cook for no one but my dear cats, and now and then, as you see, I invite their companions from the neighborhood.” Little Muck told her how hard it had gone with him since his father’s death, and entreated her to let him dine, that day, with her cats. The old woman, on whom the frank relation of the little fellow made quite an impression, permitted him to become her guest, and gave him abundance to eat and drink. When he was satisfied and refreshed, she looked at him for some time, and then said:—
“Little Muck, remain with me in my service; you will have little to do, and shall be well taken care of.” Muck, who had relished the cat-porridge, agreed, and thus became the servant of the Frau Ahavzi. His duties were light but singular: Frau Ahavzi had two male, and four female cats; every morning Little Muck had to comb their hair, and anoint them with costly ointment. When the Frau went out, he had to give them all his attention; when they ate, he placed their bowls before them; and, at night, he had to lay them on silken cushions, and wrap them up in velvet coverings. There were, moreover, a few little dogs in the house, on which he was obliged to wait; but there were not so many ceremonies gone through with these as with the cats, whom Frau Ahavzi treated as her own children. As for the rest, Muck led as retired a life as in his father’s house, for with the exception of the Frau, he saw every day only dogs and cats.
For a long time it went very well with Little Muck; he had enough to eat, and but little to do; and the old woman seemed to be perfectly satisfied with him. But, by-and-by, the cats began to behave very badly; the moment the Frau went out, they ran around the rooms as if possessed, threw down every thing in confusion, and broke considerable fine crockery, which stood in their way. When, however, they heard their mistress coming up the steps, they would creep to their cushions, and wag their tails, when they saw her, as if nothing had happened. The Frau Ahavzi always fell in a passion when she saw her rooms so disordered, and attributed all to Muck; assert his innocence as he might, she believed her cats who looked so demure, in preference to her servant.
Little Muck was very sorry that here also he had been disappointed in finding his fortune, and determined in his own mind to leave the service of the Frau Ahavzi. As, however, on his first journey, he had learned how badly one lives without money, he resolved to procure, in some way, for himself the wages which his mistress had once promised him, but had never paid. In the house of the Frau Ahavzi was a room, which was always closed, and the inside of which he had never seen. Nevertheless, he had often heard the Frau making a noise therein, and he would have willingly risked his life to know what was there concealed. Reflecting upon his travelling-money, it occurred to him that there his mistress might conceal her treasures. But the door was always tightly closed, and therefore he could not get at them.
One morning, after the Frau Ahavzi had gone out, one of the little dogs who was treated by her in a very stepmother-like manner, but whose favor he had in a great degree gained by various acts of kindness, pulled him by his wide pantaloons, and acted as if he wanted Muck to follow him. Muck, who always gladly played with him, did so, and perceived that the dog was leading him to the sleeping apartment of his mistress; he stopped before a door, which the little fellow had never before observed, and which was now wide open. The dog entered, and Muck, following, was overjoyed at finding himself in the very chamber, which had so long been the object of his curiosity. He looked all around for money, but could find none: old garments only, and strangely-fashioned vases were scattered around. One of the latter, in particular, attracted his attention; it was of crystal, and fine figures were cut thereon. He lifted it up and turned it on all sides; but, oh horror! he had not observed that it had a lid, which was but insecurely fastened on: it fell to the floor, and broke into a thousand pieces.
For a long time stood Little Muck motionless through terror; now was his fate decided, now must he fly, or be killed by the old woman. His departure was immediately resolved on; he only looked around, to see if he could not use some of the goods of the Frau Ahavzi upon his journey. Thereupon, a formidable pair of huge slippers met his eye; they were not, it is true, beautiful, but his own could hold out no longer; moreover their size was an inducement, for when he had these upon his feet, people would see, he hoped, that he had cast off the shoes of childhood. He quickly took off his own slippers, and put on the others. A walking-stick, also, with a fine lion’s head cut upon the handle, seemed to be standing too idly in the corner; so he seized it, and hurried from the apartment. He hastened to his own room, put on his cloak, arranged his paternal turban, placed the dagger in his girdle, and ran as fast as his feet would carry him, out of the house, and out of the city. Fear of his old mistress drove him farther and still farther, until, from fatigue, he could scarcely run any more. He had never gone so quickly in his life; nay, it appeared to him as if he could not cease running, for an invisible power seemed propelling him on. At last he observed that this must be connected with the slippers, for they would continually shoot forward and bear him along with them. He endeavored in various ways, to stand still, but could not succeed; at last, in the greatest distress, he cried out to himself, as a man calls to his horse, Oh—Oh, stop, Oh!” Then the slippers stopped, and Muck fell exhausted upon the earth.
The slippers were a source of great joy to him. Thus had he, by his services, gained something that would help him on his way through the world to seek his fortune. In spite of his joy, he fell asleep through fatigue; for the body of Little Muck, which had to carry so heavy a head, could not hold out long. In his dream the little dog appeared to him, which had assisted him to the slippers in the house of the Frau Ahavzi, and thus spoke:—
“Dear Muck, thou dost not still rightly understand the use of the slippers: know that if, in them, thou turnest thyself three times around upon the heel, thou canst fly wherever thou wilt; and with the staff thou canst find treasures, for, wherever gold is buried, it will beat three times upon the earth; where silver, twice.”
Thus dreamed Little Muck. When he awoke, he reflected on the singular vision, and resolved to make the experiment immediately. He put on the slippers, lifted one foot, and began to turn around upon his heel. But whoever has attempted to perform this manœuvre in an enormously wide slipper, will not wonder that the Little Muck could not succeed, particularly when he remembers that his heavy head kept falling on this side and on that.
The poor little fellow fell several times violently upon his nose; nevertheless, that did not deter him from making the trial again, and at last he succeeded. Like a wheel he went around upon his heel, wishing himself in the nearest large city, and—the slippers mounted into the air, ran with the speed of the wind through the clouds, and before Little Muck knew what to make of it, he found himself in a large market-place, where many stalls were erected, and innumerable men were busily running to and fro. He moved among the people, but considered it more prudent to retire into a less frequented street, for near the market one of the slippers bore him along so rapidly, that he almost fell down, or else ran against one and another with his projecting dagger, so that it was with difficulty he avoided their blows.
Little Muck now seriously reflected what he should set about, in order to earn a piece of money. He had, it is true, a staff which would show him concealed treasures, but how could he find a place where gold or silver was buried. He could, indeed, in this emergency, have exhibited himself for money, but for this he was too proud. At last the quickness of his gait occurred to him. Perhaps, thought he, my slippers can procure me support, and he determined to hire himself out as a courier. He ventured to hope that the king of the city rewarded such service well, so he inquired for the palace. Before the door of the palace stood a guard, who asked him what he sought there. On answering that he was in search of service, they led him to the overseer of the slaves. Before this one he laid his request, and entreated that he might be admitted among the royal couriers. The overseer measured him with his eyes from head to foot, and said: “How! with thy little feet, which are scarcely a span long, wishest thou to become a royal messenger? Away with thee! I cannot play with every fool.”
Little Muck assured him, however, that his proposal was made in perfect seriousness, and that he would let it come to a trial with the swiftest, upon a wager. The matter seemed very ludicrous to the overseer. He commanded him to hold himself in readiness for a race in the afternoon, and leading him into the kitchen, saw that he was furnished with proper meat and drink. He himself, however, repaired unto the king, and told him of the little man and his proposal. The king was a merry lord, and therefore it pleased him well that the overseer had kept the little man for their amusement. He directed him to make preparations in a large meadow behind the castle, that the race might be conveniently beheld by his whole court, and once more commanded him to take great care of the dwarf. The king told his princes, and princesses, what a pastime they were to enjoy that afternoon; these told it again to their attendants, and when the time arrived all were in great expectation; and as many as had feet poured into the meadow, where a scaffolding had been erected, in order to see the boastful dwarf run.
As soon as the king and his sons and daughters had taken their places upon the platform, the Little Muck walked forth upon the meadow, and made before the noble sovereign a very elegant bow. A universal cry of joy arose, the moment they beheld the little fellow; such a figure had they never seen. The small body with the mighty head, the little cloak, and the wide pantaloons, the long dagger in the broad girdle, the tiny feet in the immense slippers—no! it was so droll a sight they could not keep from laughing aloud. Little Muck, however, was not disconcerted by their laughter. He proudly walked forward, supported by his cane, and awaited his opponent. At Muck’s own desire, the overseer of the slaves had selected the best runner. Walking in, he placed himself near the dwarf, and both looked for the signal. Thereupon the Princess Amarza made a sign with her veil as had been preconcerted, and, like two arrows shot from the same bow, the racers flew over the meadow.
At first the courier took a tremendous bound, but Muck pursued him in his slipper carriage, overtook him, passed him, and had been standing for some time at the goal, when his opponent, gasping for breath, ran up. Amazement for a few moments enchained the spectators: the king was the first to clap his hands; then shouted the crowd for joy, all exclaiming, “Long live the Little Muck, the victor in the race!”
Meanwhile they had brought up the little man; he prostrated himself before the king, saying, “Most mighty King, I have here given thee but a small proof of my powers; allow them, I pray thee, to give me a place among thy couriers.” The king answered:—
“Nay, dear Muck, thou shalt be my favorite messenger, and shalt remain about my person; every year shalt thou have a hundred gold pieces as thy wages, and thou shalt sup at the table of my first attendant.”
Then Muck thought he had at last found the fortune, of which he had so long been in search, and was merry and light-hearted. Moreover, he rejoiced in the peculiar favor of the king, for the latter employed him on his quickest and most secret errands, which he performed with the greatest care, and with inconceivable rapidity.
But the other attendants of the king were not well affected towards him, because they reluctantly saw themselves displaced from their lord’s favor by a dwarf, who knew how to do nothing, but to run fast. They set on foot many a conspiracy against him in order to work his destruction, but all failed, through the confidence which the king placed in his private Chief Messenger, (for to this dignity had he in so short a time arrived.)
Muck, upon whom these movements against himself produced no effect, thought not of revenge; for that he had too good a heart: no, he reflected upon the means of making himself necessary to his enemies, and beloved by them. Thereupon the staff, which in his good fortune he had forgotten, occurred to him; if he could find treasures, he thought the lords would be more favorably disposed towards him. He had before this often heard that the father of the present king had buried much of his gold, when the enemy had invaded the land; they said, moreover, that he had died without imparting the secret to his son. From this time Muck always carried his cane, in the hope that he would some time pass over the place where the money of the old king was buried.
One evening, chance led him into a remote portion of the castle-garden, which he seldom visited, when suddenly he felt the staff move in his hand, and three times it beat upon the ground. He knew in an instant what this indicated; accordingly he drew forth his dagger, made marks on the surrounding trees, and then slipped back into the castle. Then he procured a spade, and awaited night for his undertaking.
Treasure-digging, however, gave Muck more trouble than he had anticipated. His arms were very feeble, his spade large and heavy; he might perhaps have been laboring a couple of hours, without getting any farther down than as many feet. At length he hit upon something hard, which sounded like iron: he then set to work still more diligently, and soon brought up a large cover; he then descended into the hole, in order to examine what the cover concealed, and found a large pot completely full of gold pieces. His feeble wisdom, however, did not teach him to lift up the pot; but he put in his pantaloons and girdle as much as he could carry, filled his cloak, and then carefully covering up the rest, placed the load upon his back. But, indeed, if he had not had the slippers on his feet, he could not have stirred, so heavily did the gold weigh him down. Then, unobserved, he reached his room, and secured the money under the cushions of his sofa.
When the little man saw so much gold in his possession, he thought the tables would now be turned, and that from among his enemies at court, he could gain many well-wishers and warm friends. But even in this, one could see that the good Muck had enjoyed no very careful education; otherwise he would not have imagined that he could buy true friends with gold. Ah! that he had then put on his slippers, and with his mantle full of gold, scampered away!
The gold which from this time Little Muck distributed with lavish hand, awakened the envy of the other court-attendants. The kitchen-master, Ahuli, said, “He is a counterfeiter.” The slave-overseer, Achmet, said, “He has cajoled the king.” But Archaz, the treasurer, his most wicked enemy, who himself, even, now and then put his hand into his lord’s coffers, exclaimed, “He is a thief.” In order to be sure of the thing, they consulted together, and the head cup-bearer, Korchuz, placed himself one day, with a very sorrowful and depressed air, before the eyes of the king. He made his woe so apparent, that the king asked him what was the matter.
“Ah!” answered he, “I am sorry that I have lost the favor of my lord!”
“Why talkest thou idly, friend Korchuz?” rejoined the monarch. “Since when have I veiled from thee the sun of my favor?”
The cup-bearer answered that he loaded his own Chief Messenger with money but gave his poor faithful servants nothing. The king was much astonished at this accusation, had the story of Muck’s gold-distribution told him, and the conspirators soon aroused in him the suspicion that the dwarf had, in some way or other, stolen the money from the treasure-chamber. Very pleasant was this turn of the matter to the treasurer, who would not otherwise have willingly submitted his accounts to examination. The king thereupon commanded that they should secretly watch all the movements of the dwarf, in order, if possible, to surprise him in the act. When, now, on the night which followed the fatal day, seeing his funds almost exhausted by his generosity, Muck crept forth, with his spade, into the castle-garden, to bring new supplies from his secret treasury, the watch followed him in the distance, led by Ahuli and Archaz; and, at the moment when he was removing the gold from the pot to his cloak, they fell upon him, bound him, and immediately led him before the king. The latter, whom, independently of any thing else, this interruption of his sleep would have enraged, received his poor dwarf very ungraciously, and ordered an immediate trial. Meanwhile they had dug the full pot out of the ground, and with the spade and cloak full of gold had placed it before the king. The treasurer said that he had surprised Muck with his guard, just as he had buried this vessel of gold in the earth.
The king thereupon inquired of the accused, whether it was true, and whence the gold had come.
Little Muck, conscious of innocence, answered that he had discovered this pot in the garden; that he had not buried it, but had brought it to light.
All present laughed aloud at this defence; the king, however, provoked in the highest degree by the supposed impudence of the dwarf, exclaimed, “How, wretch! wilt thou so stupidly and shamelessly lie to thy king, after having stolen from him? Treasurer Archaz, I command thee to say whether thou knowest this sum of gold to be the same that is missing from my treasury.”
The treasurer thereupon answered that he was sure of the thing; that so much and even more had been missing from the royal treasures; and he could take his oath that this was the stolen money. Then the king commanded them to place Little Muck in galling chains, and convey him to prison: to Archaz, however, he gave the gold, that he might restore it to the treasury. Delighted at the fortunate issue of the matter, the officer took it, and counted out, at home, the glittering gold pieces; but the bad man never disclosed that down in the pot lay a letter, to the following purport:—

“The enemy has overrun my land; therefore I here conceal a portion of my treasure. Whoever may find it, the curse of his king fall upon him, if he do not immediately deliver it to my son!
King Sadi.”

In his dungeon, poor Muck gave way to sorrowful reflections; he knew that for taking royal property death was the penalty; and yet—he could not betray the secret of his staff unto the king, because, in that case, he justly feared being deprived of both that, and his slippers. His slippers, alas! could render him no help, for there by close fetters he was fastened to the wall, and, torment himself as he might, he could not turn around upon his heel. When, however, on the next day, sentence of death was pronounced, he thought it would be better to live without the magic staff, than to die with it; and, having asked a private audience with the king, disclosed to him the secret. At first the king gave no credit to his assertions, but Little Muck promised him a proof, if he would respite him from death. The king gave him his word upon it, and having had some gold buried in the earth, unseen by Muck, commanded him to find it with his cane. In a few moments he succeeded in doing so, for the staff beat three times distinctly upon the ground. Then the king saw that his treasurer had betrayed him, and sent him, as is customary in the East, a silken cord, wherewith he should strangle himself. To Little Muck, however, he said:—
“I have indeed promised thee thy life, but it seems to me that this is not the only secret thou art possessed of, connected with this staff. Therefore thou shalt remain in everlasting captivity, if thou do not confess what relation exists between it and thy rapid running.”
Little Muck, whom one night in his dungeon had deprived of all desire for further confinement, acknowledged that his whole art lay in the slippers; nevertheless, he informed not the king of the wonderful effect of turning three times upon the heel. The king put on the slippers, himself, in order to make the experiment, and ran, like mad, through the garden; often did he wish to hold up, but he knew not how to bring the slippers to a halt, and Muck, who could not deny himself this revenge, let him run on, until he fell down exhausted.
When the king returned to consciousness, he was terribly angry at Little Muck, who had suffered him to run until so entirely out of breath. “I have promised thee thy freedom and life,” said he, “but within twelve hours must thou leave my land; otherwise will I have thee hung.” The slippers and cane, however, he commanded them to bear to his treasure-chamber.
Thus, poor as ever, wandered the little fellow forth through the land, cursing the folly which had led him astray, and prevented his playing an important part at court. The land from which he was banished, was fortunately not extensive, and accordingly eight hours brought him to the frontier; but travelling, now that he was used to his dear slippers, came very hard to him. Having arrived at the border, he chose the usual road for reaching the most lonely part of the forest, for he hated all men, and resolved to live there by himself. In a thick portion of the wood, he lighted on a place, which seemed to him quite suitable for the resolution he had taken. A clear brook, surrounded by large shady fig-trees, and a soft turf, invited him: he threw himself down, determined to taste food no more, but calmly to await his end. Amid his sorrowful reflections on death, he fell asleep; when he awoke, he was tormented by hunger, and began to think that starving to death was rather an unpleasant affair; so he looked around to find something to eat.
Fine ripe figs hung upon the tree beneath which he had slept; he stretched forth his hand to pluck some; their taste was delicious, and then he descended into the brook to slake his thirst. But what was his horror, when the water showed his head adorned with two immense ears, and a long thick nose! Amazed, he clapped his hands upon his ears, and they were really more than half an ell long.
“I deserve ass’s ears!” he exclaimed; “for, like an ass, have I trodden Fortune under my feet.” He wandered around among the trees, and feeling hunger again, was obliged to have recourse once more to the fig-tree, for he could find nothing else that was eatable. After the second portion of figs, it struck him that if his ears could find room beneath his large turban, he would not look so ridiculous, and, on trying it, he found that his ears had vanished. He ran straight back to the stream, in order to convince himself thereof; it was actually so; his ears had resumed their original figure, his long misshapen nose was no more! He soon perceived how all this had happened; from the first fig-tree he had received the long nose and ears, the second had relieved him of them: he saw with joy that kind destiny yet again placed in his hands the means of becoming fortunate. He plucked, therefore, from each tree as many figs as he could carry, and went back to the land which shortly before he had left. There, in the first town, he disguised himself by means of different garments; then, turning again to the city inhabited by the king, he soon arrived at it.
For about a year ripe fruit had been quite scarce; Little Muck, therefore, placed himself before the gate of the palace, for from his former residence there, it was well known to him, that here such rarities would be purchased by the kitchen-master for the royal table. Muck had not long been seated, when he saw that dignitary walking across the court-yard. He examined the articles of the traders who had placed themselves at the palace-gate; at length his eye fell upon Muck’s little basket.
“Ah! a dainty morsel!” said he, “which will certainly please his majesty: what wish you for the whole basket?” Muck set a high price upon them, and the bargain was soon struck. The kitchen-master gave the basket to his slave, and went his way: meantime Little Muck stole away, for he feared, when the change should show itself on the heads of the court, that he, as the one who sold them, would be sought for punishment.
At table the king was well pleased, and praised his kitchen-master more than ever, on account of his good kitchen, and the care with which he always sought the rarest morsels for his table; the officer, however, who well knew what dainties he had in the back-ground, smiled pleasantly, and let fall but few words: “The day is not all past till evening,” or “End good, all good;” so that the princesses were very curious to know what he would still bring on. The moment, however, he had the fine, inviting figs set upon the table, a universal “Ah!” escaped the lips of those who were present. “How ripe! how delicate!” exclaimed the king; “kitchen-master, thou art a whole-souled man, and deservest our peculiar favor!” Thus speaking, the king, who with such choice dishes took care to be very sparing, with his own hands distributed the figs around the table. Each prince and princess received two; the ladies of the court, the Viziers and Agas, each one; the rest he placed before himself, and began to swallow them with great delight.
“In the name of heaven, father, why lookest thou so strange?” suddenly exclaimed the Princess Amarza. All gazed in astonishment upon the king; vast ears hung down from his head, a long nose stretched itself bridge-like, over above his chin; upon themselves also they looked, one upon another, with amazement and horror; all, more or less, were adorned with the same strange headdress.
The horror of the court may be imagined. All the physicians in the city were immediately sent for; they came with a blustering air, prescribed pills and mixtures, but ears and noses remained. They operated on one of the princes, but the ears grew out again.
From the place of concealment into which he had withdrawn, Muck had heard the whole story, and perceived that it was now time for him to commence operations. He had already, with the money obtained by the sale of his figs, procured a dress which would represent him as a learned man; a long beard of goat’s hair completed the illusion. With a small sack full of figs he repaired to the royal palace, and offered his assistance as a foreign physician. At first they were quite incredulous; but when Little Muck gave a fig to one of the princes, and thereby restored ears and nose to their original shape, then were all eager to be cured by the stranger. But the king took him silently by the hand, and led him to his apartment; then, opening a door that led into the treasure-chamber, he made signs to Muck to follow.
“Here are my treasures,” said the king; “choose for thyself: whatever it may be, it shall be thine, if thou wilt free me from this shameful evil.” This was sweet music in the ears of Little Muck: at the moment of entering he had seen his slippers standing upon the floor, and hard by lay his little staff. He moved around the room, as if in wonder at the royal treasures; but no sooner had he reached his beloved shoes, than he hastily slipped into them, and seizing the little cane, tore off his false beard, and displayed to the astonished king the well-known countenance of his exiled Muck.

“False king!” said he, “who rewardest faithful service with ingratitude, take, as well-deserved punishment, the deformity which thou now hast. The ears I leave thee, that, each day they may remind thee of Little Muck.” Having thus spoken, he turned quickly around upon his heel, wished himself far away, and before the king could call for help Little Muck had vanished. Ever since, he has lived here in great affluence, but alone, for men he despises. Experience has made him a wise man—one who, though there is something offensive in his exterior, deserves rather your admiration than your ridicule.

Such was my father’s story. I assured him that I sincerely repented of my behavior towards the good little man, and he remitted the other half of the punishment which he had intended for me. To my comrades I told the wonderful history of the dwarf, and we conceived such an affection for him, that no one insulted him any more. On the contrary, we honored him as long as he lived, and bowed as low to him as to Cadi or Mufti.

The travellers determined to rest a day in this caravansary, in order to refresh themselves and their beasts for the rest of their journey. The gayety of the day before again prevailed, and they diverted themselves with various sports. After the meal, however, they called upon the fifth merchant, Ali Sizah, to perform his duty to the rest, and give them a story. He answered, that his life was too poor in remarkable adventures for him to relate one connected therewith, but he would tell them something which had no relation to it: “The story of the False Prince.”


THE STORY OF THE FALSE PRINCE

THERE was once an honest journeyman tailor, by name Labakan, who learned his trade with an excellent master in Alexandria. It could not be said that Labakan was unhandy with the needle; on the contrary, he could do excellent work: moreover, one would have done him injustice to have called him lazy. Nevertheless, his companions knew not what to make of him, for he would often sew for hours together so rapidly that the needle would glow in his hand, and the thread smoke, and that none could equal him. At another time however (and this, alas! happened more frequently) he would sit in deep meditation, looking with his staring eyes straight before him, and with a countenance and air so peculiar, that his master and fellow-journeymen could say of his appearance nothing else than, “Labakan his aristocratic face on again.”
On Friday, however, when others quietly returned home from prayers to their labor, Labakan would come forth from the mosque in a fine garment which he had made for himself with great pains, and walk with slow and haughty steps through the squares and streets of the city. At such times, if one of his companions cried, “Joy be with thee!” or, “How goes it, friend Labakan?” he would patronizingly give a token of recognition with his hand, or, if he felt called upon to be very polite, would bow genteelly with the head. Whenever his master said to him in jest, “Labakan, in thee a prince is lost,” he would be rejoiced, and answer, “Have you observed it too?” or, “I have already long thought so.”
In this manner did the honest journeyman tailor conduct himself for a long time, while his master tolerated his folly, because, in other respects, he was a good man and an excellent workman. But one day, Selim, the sultan’s brother, who was travelling through Alexandria, sent a festival-garment to his master to have some change made in it, and the master gave it to Labakan, because he did the finest work. In the evening, when the apprentices had all gone forth to refresh themselves after the labor of the day, an irresistible desire drove Labakan back into the workshop, where the garment of the sultan’s brother was hanging. He stood some time, in reflection, before it, admiring now the splendor of the embroidery, now the varied colors of the velvet and silk. He couldn’t help it, he had to put it on; and, lo! it fit him as handsomely as if it were made for him. “Am not I as good a prince as any?” asked he of himself, as he strutted up and down the room. “Has not my master himself said that I was born for a prince?” With the garments, the apprentice seemed to have assumed quite a kingly carriage; he could believe nothing else than that he was a king’s son in obscurity, and as such he resolved to travel forth into the world, leaving a city where the people hitherto had been so foolish as not to discover his innate dignity beneath the veil of his inferior station. The splendid garment seemed sent to him by a good fairy; resolving therefore not to slight so precious a gift, he put his little stock of money in his pocket, and, favored by the darkness of the night, wandered forth from Alexandria’s gates.
The new prince excited admiration everywhere upon his route, for the splendid garment, and his serious majestic air, would not allow him to pass for a common pedestrian. If one inquired of him about it, he took care to answer, with a mysterious look, that he had his reasons for it. Perceiving, however, that he rendered himself an object of ridicule by travelling on foot, he purchased for a small sum an old horse, which suited him very well, for it never brought his habitual quiet and mildness into difficulty, by compelling him to show himself off as an excellent rider, a thing which in reality he was not.
One day, as he was proceeding on his way, step by step upon his Murva (thus had he named his horse), a stranger joined him, and asked permission to travel in his company, since to him the distance would seem much shorter, in conversation with another. The rider was a gay young man, elegant and genteel in manners. He soon knit up a conversation with Labakan, with respect to his whence and whither, and it turned out that he also, like the journeyman tailor, was travelling without purpose, in the world. He said his name was Omar, that he was the nephew of Elfi Bey, the unfortunate bashaw of Cairo, and was now on his way to execute a commission which his uncle had delivered to him upon his dying-bed. Labakan was not so frank with respect to his circumstances; he gave him to understand that he was of lofty descent, and was travelling for pleasure.
The two young men were pleased with each other, and rode on in company. On the second day, Labakan interrogated his companion Omar, respecting the commission with which he was charged, and to his astonishment learned the following. Elfi Bey, the bashaw of Cairo, had brought up Omar from his earliest childhood; the young man had never known his parents. But shortly before, Elfi Bey, having been attacked by his enemies, and, after three disastrous engagements, mortally wounded, was obliged to flee, and disclosed to his charge that he was not his nephew, but the son of a powerful lord, who, inspired with fear by the prophecy of his astrologer, had sent the young prince away from his court, with an oath never to see him again until his twenty-second birthday. Elfi Bey had not told him his father’s name, but had enjoined upon him with the greatest precision, on the fourth day of the coming month Ramadan, on which day he would be two-and-twenty years old, to repair to the celebrated pillar El-Serujah, four days’ journey east of Alexandria: there he should offer to the men who would be standing by the pillar, a dagger which he gave him, with these words, “Here am I, whom ye seek!” If they answered, “Blessed be the Prophet, who has preserved thee!” then he was to follow them—they would lead him to his father.
The journeyman tailor, Labakan, was much astonished at this information; from this time he looked upon Prince Omar with envious eyes, irritated because fortune conferred upon him, though already he passed for the nephew of a mighty bashaw, the dignity of a king’s son; but on him, whom she had endowed with all things necessary for a prince, bestowed in ridicule, an obscure lineage, and an everyday vocation. He instituted a comparison between himself and the prince. He was obliged to confess that the latter was a man of very lively aspect; that fine sparkling eyes belonged to him, a boldly-arched nose, a gentlemanly, complaisant demeanor, in a word, all the external accomplishments, which every one is wont to commend. But numerous as were the charms he found in his companion, still he was compelled to acknowledge to himself, that a Labakan would be no less acceptable to the royal father than the genuine prince.
These thoughts pursued Labakan the whole day; with them he went to sleep in the nearest night-lodgings; but when he awoke in the morning, and his eye rested upon Omar sleeping near him, who was reposing so quietly, and could dream of his now certain fortune, then arose in him the thought of gaining, by stratagem or violence, what unpropitious destiny had denied him. The dagger, the returning prince’s token of recognition, hung in the sleeper’s girdle; he softly drew it forth, to plunge it in the breast of its owner. Nevertheless, the peaceable soul of the journeyman recoiled before thoughts of murder; he contented himself with appropriating the dagger, and bridling for himself the faster horse of the prince; and, ere Omar awoke to see himself despoiled of all his hopes, his perfidious companion was several miles upon his way.
The day on which Labakan robbed the prince was the first of the holy month Ramadan, and he had therefore four days to reach the pillar El-Serujah, the locality of which was well known to him. Although the region wherein it was situated could at farthest be at a distance of but four days’ journey, still he hastened to reach it, through a constant fear of being overtaken by the real prince.
By the end of the second day, he came in sight of the pillar El-Serujah. It stood upon a little elevation, in the midst of an extensive plain, and could be seen at a distance of two or three leagues. Labakan’s heart beat high at the sight: though he had had time enough on horseback, for the last two days, to think of the part he was to play, still a consciousness of guilt made him anxious; the thought that he was born for a prince, however, encouraged him again, and he advanced towards the mark with renewed confidence.
The country around the pillar was uninhabited and desert, and the new prince would have experienced some difficulty in finding sustenance, if he had not previously supplied himself for several days. He lay down beside his horse beneath some palm-trees, and there awaited his distant destiny.
Towards the middle of the next day, he saw a large procession of horses and camels crossing the plain in the direction of the pillar El-Serujah. It reached the foot of the hill, on which the pillar stood; there they pitched splendid tents, and the whole looked like the travelling-suite of some rich bashaw or sheik. Labakan perceived that the numerous train which met his eye, had taken the pains to come hither on his account, and gladly would he that moment have shown them their future lord; but he mastered his eager desire to walk as prince; for, indeed, the next morning would consummate his boldest wishes.
The morning sun awoke the too happy tailor to the most important moment of his life, which would elevate him from an inferior situation, to the side of a royal father. As he was bridling his horse to ride to the pillar, the injustice of his course, indeed, occurred to him; his thoughts pictured to him the anguish of the true prince, betrayed in his fine hopes; but the die was cast: what was done could not be undone, and self-love whispered to him that he looked stately enough to pass for the son of the mightiest king. Inspirited by these reflections, he sprang upon his horse, and collecting all his courage to bring him to an ordinary gallop, in less than a quarter of an hour, reached the foot of the hill. He dismounted from his horse, and fastened it to one of the shrubs that were growing near; then he drew the dagger of Prince Omar, and proceeded up the hill. At the base of the pillar six persons were standing around an old gray-haired man, of lofty king-like aspect. A splendid caftan of gold cloth surrounded by a white Cashmere shawl, a snowy turban spangled with glittering precious stones, pointed him out as a man of opulence and nobility. To him Labakan proceeded, and bowing low before him, said, as he extended the dagger—
“Here am I, whom you seek.”
“Praise to the Prophet who has preserved thee!” answered the gray-haired one, with tears of joy. “Omar, my beloved son, embrace thine old father!” The good tailor was deeply affected by these solemn words, and sank, with mingled emotions of joy and shame, into the arms of the old noble.
But only for a moment was he to enjoy the unclouded delight of his new rank; raising himself from the arms of the king, he saw a rider hastening over the plain in the direction of the hill. The traveller and his horse presented a strange appearance; the animal, either from obstinacy or fatigue, seemed unwilling to proceed. He went along with a stumbling gait, which was neither a pace nor a trot; but the rider urged him on, with hands and feet, to a faster run. Only too soon did Labakan recognise his horse Murva, and the real Prince Omar. But the evil spirit of falsehood once more prevailed within him, and he resolved, come what might, with unmoved front to support the rights he had usurped. Already, in the distance, had they observed the horseman making signs; at length, in spite of Murva’s slow gait, having reached the bottom of the hill, he threw himself from his horse, and began rapidly to ascend.
“Hold!” cried he. “Hold! whoever you may be, and suffer not yourselves to be deceived by a most infamous impostor! I am called Omar, and let no mortal venture to misuse my name!”
Great astonishment was depicted on the countenances of the bystanders at this turn of the affair; the old man, in particular, seemed to be much amazed, as he looked inquiringly on one and another. Thereupon Labakan spoke, with a composure gained only by the most powerful effort.
“Most gracious lord and father, be not led astray by this man. He is, as far as I know, a mad journeyman tailor of Alexandria, by name Labakan, who deserves rather our pity than our anger.”
These words excited the prince almost to frenzy. Foaming with passion, he would have sprung upon Labakan, but the bystanders, throwing themselves between, secured him, while the old man said: “Truly, my beloved son, the poor man is crazed. Let them bind him and place him on one of our dromedaries; perhaps we may be of some assistance to the unfortunate.”
The anger of the prince had abated; in tears, he cried out to the old man, “My heart tells me that you are my father; by the memory of my mother, I conjure you—hear me!”
“Alas! God guard us!” answered he: “already he again begins to talk wildly. How can the man come by such crazy thoughts?” Thereupon, seizing Labakan’s arm, he made him accompany him down the hill. They both mounted fine and richly-caparisoned coursers, and rode at the head of the procession, across the plain. They tied the hands of the unfortunate prince, however, and bound him securely upon a dromedary. Two horsemen rode constantly by his side, who kept a watchful eye upon his every movement.
The old prince was Saoud, sultan of the Wechabites. For some time had he had lived without children; at last a prince, for whom he had so ardently longed, was born to him. But the astrologer, whom he consulted respecting the destiny of his son, told him that, until his twenty-second year, he would be in danger of being supplanted by an enemy. On that account, in order that he might be perfectly safe, the sultan had given him, to be brought up, to his old and tried friend, Elfi Bey; and had lived twenty-two sad years without looking upon him.
This did the sultan impart to his supposed son, and seemed delighted beyond measure with his figure and dignified demeanor.
When they reached the sultan’s dominions, they were everywhere received by the inhabitants with shouts of joy; for the rumor of the prince’s arrival had spread like wildfire through the cities and towns. In the streets through which they proceeded, arches of flowers and branches were erected; bright carpets of all colors adorned the houses; and the people loudly praised God and his prophet, who had discovered to them so noble a prince. All this filled the proud heart of the tailor with delight: so much the more unhappy did it make the real Omar, who, still bound, followed the procession in silent despair. In this universal jubilee, though it was all in his honor, no one paid him any attention. A thousand, and again a thousand voices shouted the name of Omar; but of him who really bore this name, of him none took notice: at most, only one or two inquired whom they were carrying with them, so tightly bound, and frightfully in the ears of the prince sounded the answer of his guards, “It is a mad tailor.”
The procession at last reached the capital of the sultan, where all was prepared for their reception with still more brilliancy than in the other cities. The sultana, an elderly woman of majestic appearance, awaited them, with her whole court, in the most splendid saloon of the castle. The floor of this room was covered with a large carpet; the walls were adorned with bright blue tapestry, which was suspended from massive silver hooks, by cords and tassels of gold.

It was dark by the time the procession came up, and accordingly many globular colored lamps were lighted in the saloon, which made night brilliant as day; but with the clearest brilliancy and most varied colors shone those in the farthest part of the saloon where the sultana was seated upon a throne. The throne stood upon four steps, and was of pure gold, inlaid with amethysts. The four most illustrious emirs held a canopy of crimson silk over the head of their mistress; and the sheik of Medina cooled her with a fan of peacock feathers. Thus the sultana awaited her husband and son; the latter she had never looked on since his birth, but significant dreams had so plainly shown her the object of her longings, that she would know him out of thousands.
Now they heard the noise of the approaching troop; trumpets and drums mingled with the huzzas of the populace; the hoofs of the horses sounded on the court of the palace; steps came nearer and nearer; the doors of the room flew open, and, through rows of prostrate attendants, hastened the sultan, holding his son by the hand, towards the mother’s throne.
“Here,” said he, “do I bring to thee, him for whom thou hast so often longed.”
The sultana, however, interrupted him, crying: “This is not my son! These are not the features which the Prophet has shown me in my dreams!”
Just as the sultan was about to rebuke her superstition, the door of the saloon sprang open, and Prince Omar rushed in, followed by his guards, whom an exertion of his whole strength had enabled him to escape. Breathless, he threw himself before the throne, exclaiming:—
“Here will I die! Kill me, cruel father, for this disgrace I can endure no longer!”
All were confounded at these words; they pressed around the unfortunate one, and already were the guards, who had hurried up, on the point of seizing him and replacing his fetters, when the sultana, who had thus far looked on in mute astonishment, sprang from the throne.
“Hold!” she cried; “this, and no other, is my son! This is he, who, though my eyes have never seen him, is well known to my heart!” The guards had involuntarily fallen back from Omar, but the sultan, foaming with rage, commanded them to bind the madman.
“It is mine to decide,” he cried with commanding tone; “and here we will judge, not by a woman’s dreams, but by sure and infallible signs. This,” pointing to Labakan, “is my son, for he has brought me the dagger, the real token of my friend Elfi.”
“He stole it,” cried Omar; “he has treacherously abused my unsuspecting confidence!” But the sultan hearkened not to the voice of his son, for he was wont in all things obstinately to follow his own judgment. He bade them forcibly drag the unfortunate Omar from the saloon, and himself retired with Labakan to his chamber, filled with anger at his wife, with whom, nevertheless, he had lived in happiness for five-and-twenty years. The sultana was full of grief at this affair; she was perfectly convinced that an impostor had taken possession of the sultan’s heart, so numerous and distinct had been the dreams which pointed out the unhappy Omar as her son. When her sorrow had a little abated, she reflected on the means of convincing her husband of his mistake. This was indeed difficult, for he who had passed himself off as her son, had presented the dagger, the token of recognition, and had, moreover, as she learned, become acquainted with so much of Omar’s early life from the lips of the prince himself, as to be able to play his part without betraying himself.
She called to her the men who had attended the sultan at the pillar El-Serujah, in order to have the whole matter exactly laid before her, and then took counsel with her most trusty female slaves. She chose, and in a moment rejected, this means and that; at length, Melechsalah, an old and cunning Circassian, spoke.
“If I have heard rightly, honored mistress, the one who bore this dagger called him whom thou holdest to be thy son, a crazy tailor, Labakan?”
“Yes, it is so,” answered the sultana; “but what wilt thou make of that?”
“What think you,” proceeded the slave, “of this impostor’s having stitched his own name upon your son? If this be so, we have an excellent way of catching the deceiver, which I will impart to you in private.”
The sultana gave ear to her slave, and the latter whispered to her a plan which seemed to please her, for she immediately got ready to go to the sultan. The sultana was a sensible woman, and knew not only the weak side of her husband, but also the way to take advantage of it. She seemed therefore to give up, and to be willing to acknowledge her son, only offering one condition: the sultan, whom the outbreak between himself and his wife had grieved, agreed thereto, and she said:—
“I would fain have from each a proof of his skill; another, perhaps, would have them contend in riding, in single conflict, or in hurling spears: but these are things which everyone can do; I will give them something which will require both knowledge and dexterity. It shall be this; each shall make a caftan, and a pair of pantaloons, and then will we see at once who can make the finest ones.”
The sultan laughingly answered, “Ah! thou hast hit on a fine expedient! Shall my son contend with a mad tailor, to see who can make the best caftan? No! that cannot be.” The sultana, however, cried out, that he had already agreed to the condition, and her husband, who was a man of his word, at length yielded, though he swore, should the mad tailor make his caftan ever so beautiful, he would never acknowledge him as his son.
The sultan thereupon went to his son, and entreated him to submit to the caprices of his mother, who now positively wished to see a caftan from his hands. The heart of the good Labakan laughed with delight; if that be all that is wanting, thought he to himself, then shall the lady sultana soon behold me with joy. Two rooms had been fitted up, one for the prince, the other for the tailor; there were they to try their skill, and each was furnished with shears, needles, thread, and a sufficient quantity of silk.
The sultan was very eager to see what sort of a caftan his son would bring to light, but the heart of the sultana beat unquietly, from apprehension lest her stratagem might be unsuccessful. Two days had they been confined to their work; on the third, the sultan sent for his wife, and when she appeared, dispatched her to the apartments to bring the two caftans and their makers. With triumphant air Labakan walked in, and extended his garment before the astonished eyes of the sultan.
“Behold, father,” said he, “look, mother! see if this be not a masterpiece of a caftan. I will leave it to the most skilful court-tailor, upon a wager, whether he can produce such another.”
The sultana, smiling, turned to Omar:— “And thou, my son, what hast thou brought?”
Indignantly he cast the silk and shears upon the floor.
“They have taught me to tame horses, and to swing my sabre; and my lance will strike you a mark at sixty paces. But the art of the needle is unknown to me; it were unworthy a pupil of Elfi Bey, the lord of Cairo!”
“Oh, thou true son of my heart!” exclaimed the sultana. “Ah, that I might embrace thee, and call thee, son! Forgive me, husband and master,” she continued, turning to the sultan, “for having set on foot this stratagem against you. See you not now who is prince, and who tailor? Of a truth the caftan which your lord son has made, is magnificent, and I would fain ask with what master he has learned!”
The sultan was lost in deep reflection, looking with distrust, now on his wife, now on Labakan, who vainly sought to conceal his blushes and consternation at having so stupidly betrayed himself. “This proof pleases me not,” said he; “but, Allah be praised! I know a means of learning whether I am deceived.” He commanded them to bring his swiftest horse, mounted, and rode to a forest, which commenced not far from the city. There, according to an old tradition, lived a good fairy, named Adolzaide, who had often before this assisted with her advice the monarchs of his family, in the hour of need: thither hastened the sultan.
In the middle of the wood was an open place, surrounded by lofty cedars. There, the story said, lived the fairy; and seldom did a mortal visit this spot, for a certain awe connected with it had, from olden time, descended from father to son. When the sultan had drawn near he dismounted, tied his horse to a tree, and placing himself in the middle of the open space, cried with loud voice:—
“If it be true that thou hast given good counsel to my fathers, in the hour of need, then disdain not the request of their descendant, and advise me in a case where human understanding is too short-sighted.”
Hardly had he uttered the last word, when one of the cedars opened, and a veiled lady, in long white garments, stepped forth.
“I know, Sultan Saoud, why thou comest to me; thy wish is fair, therefore shall my assistance be thine. Take these two chests; let each of the two who claim to be thy son, choose; I know that he who is the real one, will not make a wrong selection.” Thus speaking, the veiled lady extended to him two little caskets of ivory, richly adorned with gold and pearls: upon the lids, which he vainly sought to open, were inscriptions formed by inlaid diamonds.
As he was riding home, the sultan tormented himself with various conjectures, as to what might be the contents of the caskets, which, do his best, he could not open. The words on the outside threw no light upon the matter; for on one was inscribed, Honor and Fame; upon the other, Fortune and Wealth. Saoud thought it would be difficult to make choice between these two, which seemed equally attractive, equally alluring. When he reached the palace, he sent for his wife, and told her the answer of the fairy: it filled her with an eager hope, that he to whom her heart clung, might select the casket which would indicate his royal origin.
Two tables were brought in before the sultan’s throne; on these, with his own hand, Saoud placed the two boxes; then, ascending to his seat, he gave the signal to one of his slaves to open the door of the saloon. A brilliant throng of bashaws and emirs of the realm poured through the open door: they seated themselves on the splendid cushions, which were arranged around the walls. When they had done this, Saoud gave a second signal, and Labakan was introduced; with haughty step he walked through the apartment, and prostrated himself before the throne with these words:—
“What is the command of my lord and father?” The sultan raised himself in his throne, and said:—
“My son, doubts are entertained as to the genuineness of thy claims to this name; one of these chests contains the confirmation of thy real birth. Choose! I doubt not thou wilt select the right one!” Labakan raised himself, and advanced towards the boxes; for a long time he reflected as to which he should choose, at last he said:—
“Honored father, what can be loftier than the fortune of being thy son? What more noble than the wealth of thy favor? I choose the chest which bears the inscription, Fortune And Wealth.”
“We will soon learn whether thou hast made the right choice; meanwhile sit down upon that cushion, near the bashaw of Medina,” said the sultan, again motioning to his slaves.
Omar was led in; his eye was mournful, his air dejected, and his appearance excited universal sympathy among the spectators. He threw himself before the throne, and inquired after the sultan’s pleasure. Saoud informed him that he was to choose one of the chests: he arose, and approached the table. He read attentively both inscriptions, and said:—
“The few last days have informed me how insecure is fortune, how transient is wealth; but they have also taught me that, in the breast of the brave, lives what can never be destroyed, honor, and that the bright star of renown sets not with fortune. The die is cast! should I resign a crown, Honor and Fame, you are my choice!” He placed his hand upon the casket that he had chosen, but the sultan commanded him not to open it, while he motioned to Labakan to advance, in like manner, before his table. He did so, and at the same time grasped his box. The sultan, however, had a chalice brought in, with water from Zemzem, the holy fountain of Mecca, washed his hands for supplication, and, turning his face to the East, prostrated himself in prayer:
“God of my fathers! Thou, who for centuries hast established our family, pure and unadulterated, grant that no unworthy one disgrace the name of the Abassidæ; be with thy protection near my real son, in this hour of trial.”
The sultan arose, and reascended his throne. Universal expectation enchained all present; they scarcely breathed; one could have heard a mouse crawl over the hall, so mute and attentive were all. The hindmost extended their necks, in order to get a view of the chests, over the heads of those in front. The sultan spoke: “Open the chests;” and they, which before no violence could force, now sprang open of their own accord.
In the one which Omar had chosen, lay upon a velvet cushion, a small golden crown, and a sceptre: in Labakan’s, a large needle, and a little linen thread. The sultan commanded both to bring their caskets before him: he took the little crown from the cushion in his hand, and, wonderful to see! it became larger and larger, until it reached the size of a real crown. Placing it on his son Omar, who kneeled before him, he kissed his forehead, and bade him sit upon his right hand. To Labakan, however, he turned and said:—
“There is an old proverb, ‘Shoemaker, stick to thy trade;’ it seems that thou shouldst stick to thy needle. Thou hast not, indeed, merited much mercy at my hands, but one has supplicated for thee, whom this day I can refuse nothing; therefore give I thee thy paltry life; but, if I may advise, haste thee to leave my land.”
Ashamed, ruined as he was, the poor tailor could answer nothing: he threw himself before the prince, and tears came into his eyes.
“Can you forgive me, prince?” he said.
“To be true to a friend, magnanimous to a foe, is the pride of the Abassidæ!” answered the prince, raising him. “Go in peace!”
“My true son!” cried the old sultan, deeply affected, and sinking upon Omar’s breast. The emirs and bashaws, and all the nobles of the realm, arose from their seats, to welcome the new prince, and amid this universal jubilee, Labakan, his chest under his arm, crept out of the saloon.
He went down into the sultan’s stable, bridled his horse Murva, and rode forth from the gate towards Alexandria. His whole career as prince recurred to him as a dream, and the splendid chest, richly adorned with pearls and diamonds, alone convinced him that it was not all an idle vision. Having at last reached Alexandria, he rode to the house of his old master, dismounted, and fastening his horse to the door, walked into the workshop. The master, who did not even know him, made a low bow and asked what was his pleasure: when, however, he had a nearer view of his guest, and recognised his old Labakan, he called to his journeymen and apprentices, and all precipitated themselves, like mad, upon poor Labakan, who expected no such reception; they bruised and beat him with smoothing-irons and yard-sticks, pricked him with needles, and pinched him with sharp shears, until he sank down, exhausted, on a heap of old clothes. As he lay there, the master ceased, for a moment, from his blows, to ask after the stolen garments: in vain Labakan assured him that he had come back on that account alone, to set all right; in vain offered him threefold compensation for his loss; the master and his journeymen fell upon him again, beat him terribly, and turned him out of doors. Sore and bruised, he mounted Murva, and rode to a caravansary. There he laid down his weary lacerated head, reflecting on the sorrows of earth, on merit so often unrewarded, and on the nothingness and transience of all human blessings. He went to sleep with the determination to give up all hopes of greatness, and to become an honest burgher. Nor on the following day did he repent of his resolution, for the heavy hands of his master, and the journeymen, had cudgelled out of him all thoughts of nobility.
He sold his box to a jeweller for a high price, and fitted up a workshop for his business. When he had arranged all, and had hung out, before his window, a sign with the inscription, Labakan, Merchant Tailor, he sat down and began with the needle and thread he had found in the chest, to mend the coat which his master had so shockingly torn. He was called off from his work, but on returning to it, what a wonderful sight met his eyes! The needle was sewing industriously away, without being touched by any one; it took fine, elegant stitches, such as Labakan himself had never made even in his most skilful moments.
Truly the smallest present of a kind fairy is useful, and of great value! Still another good quality had the gift; be the needle as industrious as it might, the little stock of thread never gave out.
Labakan obtained many customers, and was soon the most famous tailor for miles around. He cut out the garments, and took the first stitch therein with the needle, and immediately the latter worked away, without cessation, until the whole was completed. Master Labakan soon had the whole city for customers, for his work was beautiful, and his charges low; and only one thing troubled the brains of the people of Alexandria, namely, how he finished his work entirely without journeymen, and with closed doors.
Thus was the motto of the chest which promised fortune and wealth undergoing its accomplishment. Fortune and Wealth accompanied, with gradual increase, the steps of the good tailor, and when he listened to the praises of the young sultan Omar, who lived in every mouth; when he heard that this brave man was the object of his people’s pride and love, the terror of his enemies; then would the quondam prince say to himself, “Still is it better that I remained a tailor, for Honor and Fame are ever accompanied by danger.”
Thus lived Labakan, contented with himself, respected by his fellow-burghers; and if the needle, meanwhile, has not lost her cunning, she is still sewing with the everlasting thread of the good Fairy Adolzaide.

At sundown the Caravan set out, and soon reached Birket-el-had, or “the Pilgrims’ Fountain,” whence the distance to Cairo was three leagues. The Caravan had been expected at this time, and the merchants soon had the pleasure of seeing their friends coming forth from the city to meet them. They entered through the gate Bebel-Falch, for it was considered a good omen for those who came from Mecca to enter by this gate, because the Prophet himself had passed through it.
At the market-place the four Turkish merchants took leave of the stranger and the Greek Zaleukos, and went home with their friends. Zaleukos, however, showed his companion a good caravansary, and invited him to dine with him. The stranger agreed, and promised to make his appearance as soon as he should have changed his dress. The Greek made every arrangement for giving a fine entertainment to the stranger, for whom, upon the journey, he had conceived a deep feeling of esteem; and when the meats and drink had been brought in in proper order, he seated himself, waiting for his guest.
He heard slow and heavy steps approaching through the gallery which led to their apartment. He arose in order to meet him as a friend, and welcome him upon the threshold; but, full of horror, he started back as the door opened—the same frightful Red-mantle walked in before him! His eyes were still turned upon him; it was no illusion: the same lofty, commanding figure, the mask, from beneath which shone forth the dark eyes, the red cloak with embroidery of gold—all were but too well known to him, impressed upon his mind as they had been during the most awful moments of his life.
The breast of Zaleukos heaved with contending emotions; he had long since felt reconciled towards this too-well-remembered apparition, and forgiven him; nevertheless his sudden appearance opened every wound afresh. All those torturing hours of anguish, that woe which had envenomed the bloom of his life, rushed back for a moment, crowding upon his soul.
“What wishest thou, terrible one?” cried the Greek, as the apparition still stood motionless upon the threshold. “Away with thee, that I may curse thee not!”
“Zaleukos!” said a well-known voice from under the mask: “Zaleukos! is it thus that you receive your guest?” The speaker removed the mask, and threw back his cloak: it was Selim Baruch, the stranger! But still Zaleukos seemed not at ease, for he too plainly recognised in him the Unknown of the Ponte Vecchio: nevertheless, old habits of hospitality conquered; he silently motioned to the stranger to seat himself at the table.
“I can guess your thoughts,” commenced the latter, when they had taken their places: “your eyes look inquiringly upon me. I might have been silent, and your gaze would never more have beheld me; but I owe you an explanation, and therefore did I venture to appear before you in my former guise, even at the risk of receiving your curse. You once said to me, ‘The faith of my fathers bids me love him; and he is probably more unhappy than myself:’ be assured of this, my friend, and listen to my justification.
“I must begin far back, in order that you may fully understand my story. I was born in Alexandria, of Christian parents. My father, the youngest son of an ancient illustrious French family, was consul for his native land in the city I have just mentioned. From my tenth year I was brought up in France, by one of my mother’s brothers, and left my fatherland for the first time a few years after the revolution broke out there, in company with my uncle, who was no longer safe in the land of his ancestors, in order to seek refuge with my parents beyond the sea. We landed eagerly, hoping to find in my father’s house the rest and quiet of which the troubles of France had deprived us. But ah! in my father’s house I found not all as it should be: the external storms of these stirring times had not, it is true, reached it; but the more unexpectedly had misfortune made her home in the inmost hearts of my family. My brother, a promising young man, first secretary of my father, had shortly before married a young lady, the daughter of a Florentine noble who lived in our vicinity: two days before our arrival she had suddenly disappeared, and neither our family nor her own father could discern the slightest trace of her. At last they came to the conclusion that she had ventured too far in a walk, and had fallen into the hands of robbers. Almost agreeable was this thought to my poor brother, when compared to the truth, which only too soon became known. The perfidious one had eloped with a young Neapolitan, with whom she had become acquainted in her father’s house. My brother, who was exceedingly affected by this step, employed every means to bring the guilty one to punishment; but in vain: his attempts, which in Naples and Florence had excited wonder, served only to complete his and our misfortune. The Florentine nobleman returned to his native land, under the pretence of seeing justice done to my brother, but with the real determination of destroying us all. He frustrated all those examinations which my brother had set on foot, and knew how to use his influence, which he had obtained in various ways, so well, that my father and brother fell under suspicion of their government, were seized in the most shameful manner, carried to France, and there suffered death by the axe of the executioner. My poor mother lost her mind; and not until ten long months had passed, did death release her from her awful situation, though for the few last days she was possessed of perfect consciousness. Thus did I now stand isolated in the world: one thought alone occupied my whole soul, one thought alone bade me forget my sorrows; it was the mighty flame which my mother in her last moments had kindled within me.
“In her last moments, as I said, recollection returned; she had me summoned, and spoke with composure of our fate, and her own death. Then she sent all out of the room, raised herself, with a solemn air, from her miserable bed, and said that I should receive her blessing, if I would swear to accomplish something with which she would charge me. Amazed at the words of my dying mother, I promised with an oath to do whatever she should tell me. She thereupon broke forth in imprecations against the Florentine and his daughter, and charged me, with the most frightful threats of her curse, to avenge upon him the misfortunes of my house. She died in my arms. This thought of vengeance had long slumbered in my soul; it now awoke in all its might. I collected what remained of my paternal property, and bound myself by an oath to stake it all upon revenge, and, rather than be unsuccessful, to perish in the attempt.
“I soon arrived in Florence, where I kept myself as private as possible; it was very difficult to put my plan in execution on account of the situation which my enemy occupied. The old Florentine had become governor, and thus had in his hand all the means of destroying me, should he entertain the slightest suspicion. An accident came to my assistance. One evening I saw a man in well-known livery, walking through the streets: his uncertain gait, his gloomy appearance, and the muttered ‘Santo sacramento,’ and ‘Maledetto diavolo,’ soon made me recognise old Pietro, a servant of the Florentine, whom I had formerly known in Alexandria. There was no doubt but that he was in a passion with his master, and I resolved to turn his humor to my advantage. He appeared much surprised to see me there, told me his grievances, that he could do nothing aright for his master since he had become governor, and my gold supported by his anger soon brought him over to my side. Most of the difficulty was now removed: I had a man in my pay, who would open to me at any hour the doors of my enemy, and from this time my plan of vengeance advanced to maturity with still greater rapidity. The life of the old Florentine seemed to me too pitiful a thing, to be put into the balance with that of my whole family. Murdered before him, he must see the dearest object of his love, and this was his daughter Bianca. It was she that had so shamefully wronged my brother, it was she that had been the author of our misfortunes. My heart, thirsting for revenge, eagerly drank in the intelligence, that Bianca was on the point of being married a second time; it was settled—she must die. But as my soul recoiled at the deed, and I attributed too little nerve to Pietro, we looked around for a man to accomplish our fell design. I could hire no Florentine, for there was none that would have undertaken such a thing against the governor. Thereupon Pietro hit upon a plan, which I afterwards adopted, and he thereupon proposed you, being a foreigner and a physician, as the proper person. The result you know: only, through your excessive foresight and honesty, my undertaking seemed, at one time, to be tottering; hence the scene with the mantle.
“Pietro opened for us the little gate in the governor’s palace; he would have let us out, also, in the same secret manner, if we had not fled, overcome by horror at the frightful spectacle, which, through the crack of the door, presented itself to our eyes. Pursued by terror and remorse, I ran on about two hundred paces, until I sank down upon the steps of a church. There I collected myself again, and my first thought was of you, and your awful fate, if found within the house.
“I crept back to the palace, but neither of Pietro nor yourself could I discover a single trace. The door, however, was open, and I could at least hope that you had not neglected this opportunity of flight.
“But when the day broke, fear of detection, and an unconquerable feeling of remorse, allowed me to remain no longer within the walls of Florence. I hastened to Rome. Imagine my consternation, when, after a few days, the story was everywhere told, with the addition that, in a Grecian physician, they had detected the murderer. In anxious fear, I returned to Florence; my vengeance now seemed too great: I cursed it again and again, for with your life it was purchased all too dearly. I arrived on the same day which cost you a hand. I will not tell you what I felt, when I saw you ascend the scaffold, and bear all with such heroism. But when the blood gushed forth in streams, then was my resolution taken, to sweeten the rest of your days. What has since happened you know; it only now remains to tell you, why I have travelled with you. As the thought that you had never yet forgiven me, pressed heavily upon me, I determined to spend some days with you, and at last to give you an explanation of what I had done.”
Silently had the Greek listened to his guest; with a kind look, as he finished, he offered him his right hand.
“I knew very well that you must be more unhappy than I, for that awful deed will, like a thick cloud, forever darken your days. From my heart I forgive you. But answer me yet one question: how came you under this form, in the wilderness? What did you set about, after purchasing my house in Constantinople?”
“I returned to Alexandria,” answered the guest. “Hate against all mankind raged in my bosom; burning hate, in particular, against that people, whom they call ‘the polished nation.’ Believe me, my Moslem friends pleased me better. Scarcely a month had I been in Alexandria, when the invasion of my countrymen took place. I saw in them only the executioners of my father and brother; I, therefore, collected some young people of my acquaintance, who were of the same mind as myself, and joined those brave Mamelukes, who were so often the terror of the French host. When the campaign was finished, I could not make up my mind to return to the peaceful arts. With my little band of congenial friends, I led a restless, careless life, devoted to the field and the chase. I live contented among this people, who honor me as their chief; for though my Asiatics are not quite so refined as your Europeans, yet are they far removed from envy and slander, from selfishness and ambition.”
Zaleukos thanked the stranger for his relation, but did not conceal from him, that he would find things better suited to his rank and education, if he would live and work in Christian, in European lands. With delight his companion looked upon him.
“I know by this,” said he, “that you have entirely forgiven me, that you love me: receive, in return, my heartfelt thanks.” He sprang up, and stood in full height before the Greek, whom the warlike air, the dark sparkling eyes, the deep mysterious voice of his guest, almost inspired with fear. “Thy proposal is intended kindly,” continued he; “for another it might have charms; but I—I cannot accept it. Already stands my horse saddled: already do my attendants await me. Farewell, Zaleukos!”
The friends whom destiny had so strangely thrown together, embraced at parting. “And how may I call thee? What is the name of my guest, who will forever live in my remembrance?” exclaimed the Greek.
The stranger gazed at him some time, and said, as he pressed his hand once more: “They call me ‘the lord of the wilderness;’ I am the Robber Orbasan!”


MÄRCHEN-ALMANACH AUF DAS JAHR 1826


INHALT

Märchen als Almanach
Die Karawane (Rahmenerzählung)
Die Geschichte vom Kalif Storch
Die Geschichte von dem Gespensterschiff
Die Geschichte von der abgehauenen Hand
Die Errettung Fatmes
Die Geschichte von dem kleinen Muck
Das Märchen vom falschen Prinzen


MÄRCHEN ALS ALMANACH

In einem schönen, fernen Reiche, von welchem die Sage lebt, daß die Sonne in seinen ewig grünen Gärten niemals untergehe, herrschte von Anfang an bis heute die Königin Phantasie. Mit vollen Händen spendete diese seit vielen Jahrhunderten die Fülle des Segens über die Ihrigen und war geliebt, verehrt von allen, die sie kannten. Das Herz der Königin war aber zu groß, als daß sie mit ihren Wohltaten bei ihrem Lande stehen geblieben wäre; sie selbst, im königlichen Schmuck ihrer ewigen Jugend und Schönheit, stieg herab auf die Erde; denn sie hatte gehört, daß dort Menschen wohnen, die ihr Leben in traurigem Ernst, unter Mühe und Arbeit hinbringen. Diesen hatte sie die schönsten Gaben aus ihrem Reiche mitgebracht, und seit die schöne Königin durch die Fluren der Erde gegangen war, waren die Menschen fröhlich bei der Arbeit, heiter in ihrem Ernst.
Auch ihre Kinder, nicht minder schön und lieblich als die königliche Mutter, sandte sie aus, um die Menschen zu beglücken. Einst kam Märchen, die älteste Tochter der Königin, von der Erde zurück. Die Mutter bemerkte, daß Märchen traurig sei, ja, hier und da wollte ihr bedünken, als ob sie verweinte Augen hätte.
„Was hast du, liebes Märchen“, sprach die Königin zu ihr, „du bist seit deiner Reise so traurig und niedergeschlagen, willst du deiner Mutter nicht anvertrauen, was dir fehlt?“
„Ach, liebe Mutter“, antwortete Märchen, „ich hätte gewiß nicht so lange geschwiegen, wenn ich nicht wüßte, daß mein Kummer auch der deinige ist.“
„Sprich immer, meine Tochter“, bat die schöne Königin, „der Gram ist ein Stein, der den einzelnen niederdrückt, aber zwei tragen ihn leicht aus dem Wege.“
„Du willst es“, antwortete Märchen, „so höre: Du weißt, wie gerne ich mit den Menschen umgehe, wie ich freudig auch bei dem Ärmsten vor seiner Hütte sitze, um nach der Arbeit ein Stündchen mit ihm zu verplaudern; sie boten mir auch sonst gleich freundlich die Hand zum Gruß, wenn ich kam, und sahen mir lächelnd und zufrieden nach, wenn ich weiterging; aber in diesen Tagen ist es gar nicht mehr so!“
„Armes Märchen!“ sprach die Königin und streichelte ihr die Wange, die von einer Träne feucht war, „aber du bildest dir vielleicht dies alles nur ein?“
„Glaube mir, ich fühle es nur zu gut“, entgegnete Märchen, „sie lieben mich nicht mehr. Überall, wo ich hinkomme, begegnen mir kalte Blicke; nirgends bin ich mehr gern gesehen; selbst die Kinder, die ich doch immer so lieb hatte, lachen über mich und wenden mir altklug den Rücken zu.“
Die Königin stützte die Stirne in die Hand und schwieg sinnend.
„Und woher soll es denn“, fragte die Königin, „kommen, Märchen, daß sich die Leute da unten so geändert haben?“
„Sieh, die Menschen haben kluge Wächter aufgestellt, die alles, was aus deinem Reich kommt, o Königin Phantasie, mit scharfem Blicke mustern und prüfen. Wenn nun einer kommt, der nicht nach ihrem Sinne ist, so erheben sie ein großes Geschrei, schlagen ihn tot oder verleumden ihn doch so sehr bei den Menschen, die ihnen aufs Wort glauben, daß man gar keine Liebe, kein Fünkchen Zutrauen mehr findet. Ach, wie gut haben es meine Brüder, die Träume, fröhlich und leicht hüpfen sie auf die Erde hinab, fragen nichts nach jenen klugen Männern, besuchen die schlummernden Menschen und weben und malen ihnen, was das Herz beglückt und das Auge erfreut!“
„Deine Brüder sind Leichtfüße“, sagte die Königin, „und du, mein Liebling, hast keine Ursache, sie zu beneiden. Jene Grenzwächter kenne ich übrigens wohl; die Menschen haben so unrecht nicht, sie aufzustellen; es kam so mancher windige Geselle und tat, als ob er geradewegs aus meinem Reiche käme, und doch hatte er höchstens von einem Berge zu uns herübergeschaut.“
„Aber warum lassen sie dies mich, deine eigene Tochter, entgelten“, weinte Märchen. „Ach, wenn du wüßtest, wie sie es mit mir gemacht haben; sie schalten mich eine alte Jungfer und drohten, mich das nächste Mal gar nicht mehr hereinzulassen.“ „Wie, meine Tochter nicht mehr einzulassen?“ rief die Königin, und Zorn rötete ihre Wangen. „Aber ich sehe schon, woher dies kommt; die böse Muhme hat uns verleumdet!“
„Die Mode? Nicht möglich!“ rief Märchen, „sie tat ja sonst immer so freundlich.“
„Oh! Ich kenne sie, die Falsche“, antwortete die Königin, „aber versuche es ihr zum Trotze wieder, meine Tochter, wer Gutes tun will, darf nicht rasten.“
„Ach, Mutter! Wenn sie mich dann ganz zurückweisen, oder wenn sie mich verleumden, daß mich die Menschen nicht ansehen oder einsam und verachtet in der Ecke stehen lassen?“
„Wenn die Alten, von der Mode betört, dich geringschätzen, so wende dich an die Kleinen, wahrlich, sie sind meine Lieblinge, ihnen sende ich meine lieblichsten Bilder durch deine Brüder, die Träume, ja, ich bin schon oft selbst zu ihnen hinabgeschwebt, habe sie geherzt und geküßt und schöne Spiele mit ihnen gespielt; sie kennen mich auch wohl, sie wissen zwar meinen Namen nicht, aber ich habe schon oft bemerkt, wie sie nachts zu meinen Sternen herauflächeln und morgens, wenn meine glänzenden Lämmer am Himmel ziehen, vor Freuden die Hände zusammenschlagen. Auch wenn sie größer werden, lieben sie mich noch, ich helfe dann den lieblichen Mädchen bunte Kränze flechten, und die wilden Knaben werden stiller, wenn ich auf hoher Felsenspitze mich zu ihnen setze, aus der Nebelwelt der fernen, blauen Berge hohe Burgen und glänzende Paläste auftauchen lasse und aus den rötlichen Wolken des Abends kühne Reiterscharen und wunderliche Wallfahrtszüge bilde.“
„O die guten Kinder!“ rief Märchen bewegt aus. „Ja, es sei! Mit ihnen will ich es noch einmal versuchen.“
„Ja, du gute Tochter“, sprach die Königin, „gehe zu ihnen; aber ich will dich auch ein wenig ordentlich ankleiden, daß du den Kleinen gefällst und die Großen dich nicht zurückstoßen; siehe, das Gewand eines Almanachs will ich dir geben.“
„Eines Almanachs, Mutter? Ach!—Ich schäme mich, so vor den Leuten zu prangen.“
Die Königin winkte, und die Dienerinnen brachten das zierliche Gewand eines Almanachs. Es war von glänzenden Farben und schöne Figuren eingewoben.
Die Zofen flochten dem schönen Mädchen das lange Haar; sie banden ihr goldene Sandalen unter die Füße und hingen ihr dann das Gewand um.
Das bescheidene Märchen wagte nicht aufzublicken, die Mutter aber betrachtete es mit Wohlgefallen und schloß es in ihre Arme. „Gehe hin“, sprach sie zu der Kleinen, „mein Segen sei mit dir. Und wenn sie dich verachten und höhnen, so kehre zurück zu mir, vielleicht, daß spätere Geschlechter, getreuer der Natur, ihr Herz dir wieder zuwenden.“
Also sprach die Königin Phantasie. Märchen aber stieg hinab auf die Erde. Mit pochendem Herzen nahte sie dem Ort, wo die klugen Wächter hauseten; sie senkte das Köpfchen zur Erde, sie zog das schöne Gewand enger um sich her, und mit zagendem Schritt nahte sie dem Tor.
„Halt!“ rief eine tiefe, rauhe Stimme. „Wache heraus! Da kommt ein neuer Almanach!“
Märchen zitterte, als sie dies hörte; viele ältliche Männer von finsterem Aussehen stürzten hervor; sie hatten spitzige Federn in der Faust und hielten sie dem Märchen entgegen. Einer aus der Schar schritt auf sie zu und packte sie mit rauher Hand am Kinn. „Nur auch den Kopf aufgerichtet, Herr Almanach“, schrie er, „daß man Ihm in den Augen ansiehet, ob er was Rechtes ist oder nicht!“
Errötend richtete Märchen das Köpfchen in die Höhe und schlug das dunkle Auge auf.
„Das Märchen!“ riefen die Wächter und lachten aus vollem Hals, „das Märchen! Haben wunder gemeint, was da käme! Wie kommst du nur in diesen Rock?“
„Die Mutter hat ihn mir angezogen“, antwortete Märchen. „So? Sie will dich bei uns einschwärzen? Nichts da! Hebe dich weg, mach, daß du fortkommst!“ riefen die Wächter untereinander und erhoben die scharfen Federn.
„Aber ich will ja nur zu den Kindern“, bat Märchen, „dies könnt ihr mir ja doch erlauben.“
„Läuft nicht schon genug solches Gesindel im Land umher?“ rief einer der Wächter. „Sie schwatzen nur unseren Kindern dummes Zeug vor.“
„Laßt uns sehen, was sie diesmal weiß!“ sprach ein anderer.
„Nun ja“, riefen sie, „sag an, was du weißt, aber beeile dich, denn wir haben nicht viele Zeit für dich!“
Märchen streckte die Hand aus und schrieb mit dem Zeigefinger viele Zeichen in die Luft. Da sah man bunte Gestalten vorüberziehen; Karawanen mit schönen Rossen, geschmückte Reiter, viele Zelte im Sand der Wüste; Vögel und Schiffe auf stürmischen Meeren; stille Wälder und volkreiche Plätze und Straßen; Schlachten und friedliche Nomaden, sie alle schwebten in belebten Bildern, in buntem Gewimmel vorüber.
Märchen hatte in dem Eifer, mit welchem sie die Bilder aufsteigen ließ, nicht bemerkt, wie die Wächter des Tores nach und nach eingeschlafen waren. Eben wollte sie neue Zeichen schreiben, als ein freundlicher Mann auf sie zutrat und ihre Hand ergriff. „Siehe her, gutes Märchen“, sagte er, indem er auf die Schlafenden zeigte, „für diese sind deine bunten Sachen nichts; schlüpfe schnell durch das Tor; sie ahnen dann nicht, daß du im Lande bist, und du kannst friedlich und unbemerkt deine Straße ziehen. Ich will dich zu meinen Kindern führen; in meinem Hause geb’ ich dir ein stilles, freundliches Plätzchen; dort kannst du wohnen und für dich leben; wenn dann meine Söhne und Töchter gut gelernt haben, dürfen sie mit ihren Gespielen zu dir kommen und dir zuhören. Willst du so?“
„Oh, wie gerne folge ich dir zu deinen lieben Kleinen; wie will ich mich befleißen, ihnen zuweilen ein heiteres Stündchen zu machen!“
Der gute Mann nickte ihr freundlich zu und half ihr, über die Füße der schlafenden Wächter hinüberzusteigen. Lächelnd sah sich Märchen um, als sie hinüber war, und schlüpfte dann schnell in das Tor.


DIE KARAWANE

Es zog einmal eine große Karawane durch die Wüste. Auf der ungeheuren Ebene, wo man nichts als Sand und Himmel sieht, hörte man schon in weiter Ferne die Glocken der Kamele und die silbernen Röllchen der Pferde, eine dichte Staubwolke, die ihr vorherging, verkündete ihre Nähe, und wenn ein Luftzug die Wolke teilte, blendeten funkelnde Waffen und helleuchtende Gewänder das Auge. So stellte sich die Karawane einem Manne dar, welcher von der Seite her auf sie zuritt. Er ritt ein schönes arabisches Pferd, mit einer Tigerdecke behängt, an dem hochroten Riemenwerk hingen silberne Glöckchen, und auf dem Kopf des Pferdes wehte ein schöner Reiherbusch. Der Reiter sah stattlich aus, und sein Anzug entsprach der Pracht seines Rosses; ein weißer Turban, reich mit Gold bestickt, bedeckte das Haupt; der Rock und die weiten Beinkleider waren von brennendem Rot, ein gekrümmtes Schwert mit reichem Griff an seiner Seite. Er hatte den Turban tief ins Gesicht gedrückt; dies und die schwarzen Augen, die unter buschigen Brauen hervorblitzten, der lange Bart, der unter der gebogenen Nase herabhing, gaben ihm ein wildes, kühnes Aussehen.
Als der Reiter ungefähr auf fünfzig Schritt dem Vortrab der Karawane nahe war, spornte er sein Pferd an und war in wenigen Augenblicken an der Spitze des Zuges angelangt. Es war ein so ungewöhnliches Ereignis, einen einzelnen Reiter durch die Wüste ziehen zu sehen, daß die Wächter des Zuges, einen Überfall befürchtend, ihm ihre Lanzen entgegenstreckten.
„Was wollt ihr“, rief der Reiter, als er sich so kriegerisch empfangen sah, „glaubt ihr, ein einzelner Mann werde eure Karawane angreifen?“
Beschämt schwangen die Wächter ihre Lanzen wieder auf, ihr Anführer aber ritt an den Fremden heran und fragte nach seinem Begehr.
„Wer ist der Herr der Karawane?“ fragte der Reiter.
„Sie gehört nicht einem Herrn“, antwortete der Gefragte, „sondern es sind mehrere Kaufleute, die von Mekka in ihre Heimat ziehen und die wir durch die Wüste geleiten, weil oft allerlei Gesindel die Reisenden beunruhigt.“
„So führt mich zu den Kaufleuten“, begehrte der Fremde.
„Das kann jetzt nicht geschehen“, antwortete der Führer, „weil wir ohne Aufenthalt weiterziehen müssen und die Kaufleute wenigstens eine Viertelstunde weiter hinten sind; wollt Ihr aber mit mir weiterreiten, bis wir lagern, um Mittagsruhe zu halten, so werde ich Eurem Wunsch willfahren.“
Der Fremde sagte hierauf nichts; er zog eine lange Pfeife, die er am Sattel festgebunden hatte, hervor und fing an in großen Zügen zu rauchen, indem er neben dem Anführer des Vortrabs weiterritt. Dieser wußte nicht, was er aus dem Fremden machen sollte; er wagte es nicht, ihn geradezu nach seinem Namen zu fragen, und so künstlich er auch ein Gespräch anzuknüpfen suchte, der Fremde hatte auf das: „Ihr raucht da einen guten Tabak“, oder: „Euer Rapp’ hat einen braven Schritt“, immer nur mit einem kurzen „Ja, ja!“ geantwortet.
Endlich waren sie auf dem Platz angekommen, wo man Mittagsruhe halten wollte. Der Anführer hatte seine Leute als Wachen aufgestellt; er selbst hielt mit dem Fremden, um die Karawane herankommen zu lassen. Dreißig Kamele, schwer beladen, zogen vorüber, von bewaffneten Führern geleitet. Nach diesen kamen auf schönen Pferden die fünf Kaufleute, denen die Karawane gehörte. Es waren meistens Männer von vorgerücktem Alter, ernst und gesetzt aussehend, nur einer schien viel jünger als die übrigen, wie auch froher und lebhafter. Eine große Anzahl Kamele und Packpferde schloß den Zug.
Man hatte Zelte aufgeschlagen und die Kamele und Pferde rings umhergestellt. In der Mitte war ein großes Zelt von blauem Seidenzeug. Dorthin führte der Anführer der Wache den Fremden. Als sie durch den Vorhang des Zeltes getreten waren, sahen sie die fünf Kaufleute auf goldgewirkten Polstern sitzen; schwarze Sklaven reichten ihnen Speise und Getränke. „Wen bringt Ihr uns da?“ rief der junge Kaufmann dem Führer zu.
Ehe noch der Führer antworten konnte, sprach der Fremde: „Ich heiße Selim Baruch und bin aus Bagdad; ich wurde auf einer Reise nach Mekka von einer Räuberhorde gefangen und habe mich vor drei Tagen heimlich aus der Gefangenschaft befreit. Der große Prophet ließ mich die Glocken eurer Karawane in weiter Ferne hören, und so kam ich bei euch an. Erlaubet mir, daß ich in eurer Gesellschaft reise! Ihr werdet euren Schutz keinem Unwürdigen schenken, und so ihr nach Bagdad kommet, werde ich eure Güte reichlich belohnen denn ich bin der Neffe des Großwesirs.“
Der älteste der Kaufleute nahm das Wort: „Selim Baruch“, sprach er, „sei willkommen in unserem Schatten. Es macht uns Freude, dir beizustehen; vor allem aber setze dich und iß und trinke mit uns.“
Selim Baruch setzte sich zu den Kaufleuten und aß und trank mit ihnen. Nach dem Essen räumten die Sklaven die Geschirre hinweg und brachten lange Pfeifen und türkischen Sorbet. Die Kaufleute saßen lange schweigend, indem sie die bläulichen Rauchwolken vor sich hinbliesen und zusahen, wie sie sich ringelten und verzogen und endlich in die Luft verschwebten. Der junge Kaufmann brach endlich das Stillschweigen: „So sitzen wir seit drei Tagen“, sprach er, „zu Pferd und am Tisch, ohne uns durch etwas die Zeit zu vertreiben. Ich verspüre gewaltig Langeweile, denn ich bin gewohnt, nach Tisch Tänzer zu sehen oder Gesang und Musik zu hören. Wißt ihr gar nichts, meine Freunde, das uns die Zeit vertreibt?“
Die vier älteren Kaufleute rauchten fort und schienen ernsthaft nachzusinnen, der Fremde aber sprach: „Wenn es mir erlaubt ist, will ich euch einen Vorschlag machen. Ich meine, auf jedem Lagerplatz könnte einer von uns den anderen etwas erzählen. Dies könnte uns schon die Zeit vertreiben.“
„Selim Baruch, du hast wahr gesprochen“, sagte Achmet, der älteste der Kaufleute, „laßt uns den Vorschlag annehmen.“
„Es freut mich, wenn euch der Vorschlag behagt“, sprach Selim, „damit ihr aber sehet, daß ich nichts Unbilliges verlange, so will ich den Anfang machen.“
Vergnügt rückten die fünf Kaufleute näher zusammen und ließen den Fremden in ihrer Mitte sitzen. Die Sklaven schenkten die Becher wieder voll, stopften die Pfeifen ihrer Herren frisch und brachten glühende Kohlen zum Anzünden. Selim aber erfrischte seine Stimme mit einem tüchtigen Zuge Sorbet, strich den langen Bart über dem Mund weg und sprach:
„So hört denn die Geschichte vom Kalif Storch.“
Als Selim Baruch seine Geschichte beendet hatte, bezeugten sich die Kaufleute sehr zufrieden damit. „Wahrhaftig, der Nachmittag ist uns vergangen, ohne daß wir merkten wie!“ sagte einer derselben, indem er die Decke des Zeltes zurückschlug. „Der Abendwind wehet kühl, und wir könnten noch eine gute Strecke Weges zurücklegen.“ Seine Gefährten waren damit einverstanden, die Zelte wurden abgebrochen, und die Karawane machte sich in der nämlichen Ordnung, in welcher sie herangezogen war, auf den Weg.
Sie ritten beinahe die ganze Nacht hindurch, denn es war schwül am Tage, die Nacht aber war erquicklich und sternhell. Sie kamen endlich an einem bequemen Lagerplatz an, schlugen die Zelte auf und legten sich zur Ruhe. Für den Fremden aber sorgten die Kaufleute, wie wenn er ihr wertester Gastfreund wäre. Der eine gab ihm Polster, der andere Decken, ein dritter gab ihm Sklaven, kurz, er wurde so gut bedient, als ob er zu Hause wäre. Die heißeren Stunden des Tages waren schon heraufgekommen, als sie sich wieder erhoben, und sie beschlossen einmütig, hier den Abend abzuwarten. Nachdem sie miteinander gespeist hatten, rückten sie wieder näher zusammen, und der junge Kaufmann wandte sich an den ältesten und sprach: „Selim Baruch hat uns gestern einen vergnügten Nachmittag bereitet, wie wäre es, Achmet, wenn Ihr uns auch etwas erzähltet, sei es nun aus Eurem langen Leben, das wohl viele Abenteuer aufzuweisen hat, oder sei es auch ein hübsches Märchen.“ Achmet schwieg auf diese Anrede eine Zeitlang, wie wenn er bei sich im Zweifel wäre, ob er dies oder jenes sagen sollte oder nicht; endlich fing er an zu sprechen:
„Liebe Freunde! Ihr habt euch auf dieser unserer Reise als treue Gesellen erprobt, und auch Selim verdient mein Vertrauen; daher will ich euch etwas aus meinem Leben mitteilen, das ich sonst ungern und nicht jedem erzähle: die Geschichte von dem Gespensterschiff.“
Die Reise der Karawane war den anderen Tag ohne Hindernis fürder gegangen, und als man im Lagerplatz sich erholt hatte, begann Selim, der Fremde, zu Muley, dem jüngsten der Kaufleute, also zu sprechen:
„Ihr seid zwar der Jüngste von uns, doch seid Ihr immer fröhlich und wißt für uns gewiß irgendeinen guten Schwank. Tischet ihn auf, daß er uns erquicke nach der Hitze des Tages!“
„Wohl möchte ich euch etwas erzählen“, antwortete Muley, „das euch Spaß machen könnte, doch der Jugend ziemt Bescheidenheit in allen Dingen; darum müssen meine älteren Reisegefährten den Vorrang haben. Zaleukos ist immer so ernst und verschlossen, sollte er uns nicht erzählen, was sein Leben so ernst machte? Vielleicht, daß wir seinen Kummer, wenn er solchen hat, lindern können; denn gerne dienen wir dem Bruder, wenn er auch anderen Glaubens ist.“
Der Aufgerufene war ein griechischer Kaufmann, ein Mann in mittleren Jahren, schön und kräftig, aber sehr ernst. Ob er gleich ein Ungläubiger (nicht Muselmann) war, so liebten ihn doch seine Reisegefährten, denn er hatte durch sein ganzes Wesen Achtung und Zutrauen eingeflößt. Er hatte übrigens nur eine Hand, und einige seiner Gefährten vermuteten, daß vielleicht dieser Verlust ihn so ernst stimme.
Zaleukos antwortete auf die zutrauliche Frage Muleys: „Ich bin sehr geehrt durch euer Zutrauen; Kummer habe ich keinen, wenigstens keinen, von welchem ihr auch mit dem besten Willen mir helfen könntet. Doch weil Muley mir meinen Ernst vorzuwerfen scheint, so will ich euch einiges erzählen, was mich rechtfertigen soll, wenn ich ernster bin als andere Leute. Ihr sehet, daß ich meine linke Hand verloren habe. Sie fehlt mir nicht von Geburt an, sondern ich habe sie in den schrecklichsten Tagen meines Lebens eingebüßt. Ob ich die Schuld davon trage, ob ich unrecht habe, seit jenen Tagen ernster, als es meine Lage mit sich bringt, zu sein, möget ihr beurteilen, wenn ihr vernommen habt die Geschichte von der abgehauenen Hand.“
Zaleukos, der griechische Kaufmann, hatte seine Geschichte geendigt. Mit großer Teilnahme hatten ihm die übrigen zugehört, besonders der Fremde schien sehr davon ergriffen zu sein; er hatte einigemal tief geseufzt, und Muley schien es sogar, als habe er einmal Tränen in den Augen gehabt. Sie besprachen sich noch lange Zeit über diese Geschichte.
„Und haßt Ihr den Unbekannten nicht, der Euch so schnöd’ um ein so edles Glied Eures Körpers, der selbst Euer Leben in Gefahr brachte?“ fragte der Fremde.
„Wohl gab es in früherer Zeit Stunden“, antwortete der Grieche, „in denen mein Herz ihn vor Gott angeklagt, daß er diesen Kummer über mich gebracht und mein Leben vergiftet habe; aber ich fand Trost in dem Glauben meiner Väter, und dieser befiehlt mir, meine Feinde zu lieben; auch ist er wohl noch unglücklicher als ich.“
„Ihr seid ein edler Mann!“ rief der Fremde und drückte gerührt dem Griechen die Hand.
Der Anführer der Wache unterbrach sie aber in ihrem Gespräch. Er trat mit besorgter Miene in das Zelt und berichtete, daß man sich nicht der Ruhe überlassen dürfe; denn hier sei die Stelle, wo gewöhnlich die Karawanen angegriffen würden, auch glaubten seine Wachen, in der Entfernung mehrere Reiter zu sehen.
Die Kaufleute waren sehr bestürzt über diese Nachricht; Selim, der Fremde, aber wunderte sich über ihre Bestürzung und meinte, daß sie so gut geschätzt wären, daß sie einen Trupp räuberischer Araber nicht zu fürchten brauchten.
„Ja, Herr!“ entgegnete ihm der Anführer der Wache. „Wenn es nur solches Gesindel wäre, könnte man sich ohne Sorge zur Ruhe legen; aber seit einiger Zeit zeigt sich der furchtbare Orbasan wieder, und da gilt es, auf seiner Hut zu sein.“
Der Fremde fragte, wer denn dieser Orbasan sei, und Achmet, der alte Kaufmann, antwortete ihm: „Es gehen allerlei Sagen unter dem Volke über diesen wunderbaren Mann. Die einen halten ihn für ein übermenschliches Wesen, weil er oft mit fünf bis sechs Männern zumal einen Kampf besteht, andere halten ihn für einen tapferen Franken, den das Unglück in diese Gegend verschlagen habe; von allem aber ist nur so viel gewiß, daß er ein verruchter Mörder und Dieb ist.“
„Das könnt Ihr aber doch nicht behaupten“, entgegnete ihm Lezah, einer der Kaufleute. „Wenn er auch ein Räuber ist, so ist er doch ein edler Mann, und als solcher hat er sich an meinem Bruder bewiesen, wie ich Euch erzählen könnte. Er hat seinen ganzen Stamm zu geordneten Menschen gemacht, und so lange er die Wüste durchstreift, darf kein anderer Stamm es wagen, sich sehen zu lassen. Auch raubt er nicht wie andere, sondern er erhebt nur ein Schutzgeld von den Karawanen, und wer ihm dieses willig bezahlt, der ziehet ungefährdet weiter; denn Orbasan ist der Herr der Wüste.“
Also sprachen unter sich die Reisenden im Zelte; die Wachen aber, die um den Lagerplatz ausgestellt waren, begannen unruhig zu werden. Ein ziemlich bedeutender Haufe bewaffneter Reiter zeigte sich in der Entfernung einer halben Stunde; sie schienen gerade auf das Lager zuzureiten. Einer der Männer von der Wache ging daher in das Zelt, um zu verkünden, daß sie wahrscheinlich angegriffen würden. Die Kaufleute berieten sich untereinander, was zu tun sei, ob man ihnen entgegengehen oder den Angriff abwarten solle. Achmet und die zwei älteren Kaufleute wollten das letztere, der feurige Muley aber und Zaleukos verlangten das erstere und riefen den Fremden zu ihrem Beistand auf. Dieser zog ruhig ein kleines, blaues Tuch mit roten Sternen aus seinem Gürtel hervor, band es an eine Lanze und befahl einem der Sklaven, es auf das Zelt zu stecken; er setze sein Leben zum Pfand, sagte er, die Reiter werden, wenn sie dieses Zeichen sehen, ruhig vorüberziehen. Muley glaubte nicht an den Erfolg, der Sklave aber steckte die Lanze auf das Zelt. Inzwischen hatten alle, die im Lager waren, zu den Waffen gegriffen und sahen in gespannter Erwartung den Reitern entgegen. Doch diese schienen das Zeichen auf dem Zelte erblickt zu haben, sie wichen plötzlich von ihrer Richtung auf das Lager ab und zogen in einem großen Bogen auf der Seite hin.
Verwundert standen einige Augenblicke die Reisenden und sahen bald auf die Reiter, bald auf den Fremden. Dieser stand ganz gleichgültig, wie wenn nichts vorgefallen wäre, vor dem Zelte und blickte über die Ebene hin. Endlich brach Muley das Stillschweigen. „Wer bist du, mächtiger Fremdling“, rief er aus, „der du die wilden Horden der Wüste durch einen Wink bezähmst?“
„Ihr schlagt meine Kunst höher an, als sie ist“, antwortete Selim Baruch. „Ich habe mich mit diesem Zeichen versehen, als ich der Gefangenschaft entfloh; was es zu bedeuten hat, weiß ich selbst nicht; nur so viel weiß ich, daß, wer mit diesem Zeichen reiset, unter mächtigem Schutze steht.“
Die Kaufleute dankten dem Fremden und nannten ihn ihren Erretter. Wirklich war auch die Anzahl der Reiter so groß gewesen, daß wohl die Karawane nicht lange hätte Widerstand leisten können.
Mit leichterem Herzen begab man sich jetzt zur Ruhe, und als die Sonne zu sinken begann und der Abendwind über die Sandebene hinstrich, brachen sie auf und zogen weiter.
Am nächsten Tage lagerten sie ungefähr nur noch eine Tagreise von dem Ausgang der Wüste entfernt. Als sich die Reisenden wieder in dem großen Zelt versammelt hatten, nahm Lezah, der Kaufmann, das Wort:
„Ich habe euch gestern gesagt, daß der gefürchtete Orbasan ein edler Mann sei, erlaubt mir, daß ich es euch heute durch die Erzählung der Schicksale meines Bruders beweise. Mein Vater war Kadi in Akara. Er hatte drei Kinder. Ich war der Älteste, ein Bruder und eine Schwester waren bei weitem jünger als ich. Als ich zwanzig Jahre alt war, rief mich ein Bruder meines Vaters zu sich. Er setzte mich zum Erben seiner Güter ein, mit der Bedingung, daß ich bis zu seinem Tode bei ihm bleibe. Aber er erreichte ein hohes Alter, so daß ich erst vor zwei Jahren in meine Heimat zurückkehrte und nichts davon wußte, welch schreckliches Schicksal indes mein Haus betroffen und wie gütig Allah es gewendet hatte.“ Die Errettung Fatmes
Die Karawane hatte das Ende der Wüste erreicht, und fröhlich begrüßten die Reisenden die grünen Matten und die dichtbelaubten Bäume, deren lieblichen Anblick sie viele Tage entbehrt hatten. In einem schönen Tale lag eine Karawanserei, die sie sich zum Nachtlager wählten, und obgleich sie wenig Bequemlichkeit und Erfrischung darbot, so war doch die ganze Gesellschaft heiterer und zutraulicher als je; denn der Gedanke, den Gefahren und Beschwerlichkeiten, die eine Reise durch die Wüste mit sich bringt, entronnen zu sein, hatte alle Herzen geöffnet und die Gemüter zu Scherz und Kurzweil gestimmt. Muley, der junge lustige Kaufmann, tanzte einen komischen Tanz und sang Lieder dazu, die selbst dem ernsten Griechen Zaleukos ein Lächeln entlockten. Aber nicht genug, daß er seine Gefährten durch Tanz und Spiel erheitert hatte, er gab ihnen auch noch die Geschichte zum besten, die er ihnen versprochen hatte, und hub, als er von seinen Luftsprüngen sich erholt hatte, also zu erzählen an: Die Geschichte von dem kleinen Muck.
„So erzählte mir mein Vater; ich bezeugte ihm meine Reue über mein rohes Betragen gegen den guten kleinen Mann, und mein Vater schenkte mir die andere Hälfte der Strafe, die er mir zugedacht hatte. Ich erzählte meinen Kameraden die wunderbaren Schicksale des Kleinen, und wir gewannen ihn so lieb, daß ihn keiner mehr schimpfte. Im Gegenteil, wir ehrten ihn, solange er lebte, und haben uns vor ihm immer so tief wie vor Kadi und Mufti gebückt.“
Die Reisenden beschlossen, einen Rasttag in dieser Karawanserei zu machen, um sich und die Tiere zur weiteren Reise zu stärken. Die gestrige Fröhlichkeit ging auch auf diesen Tag über, und sie ergötzten sich in allerlei Spielen. Nach dem Essen aber riefen sie dem fünften Kaufmann, Ali Sizah, zu, auch seine Schuldigkeit gleich den übrigen zu tun und eine Geschichte zu erzählen. Er antwortete, sein Leben sei zu arm an auffallenden Begebenheiten, als daß er ihnen etwas davon mitteilen möchte, daher wolle er ihnen etwas anderes erzählen, nämlich: Das Märchen vom falschen Prinzen.
Mit Sonnenaufgang brach die Karawane auf und gelangte bald nach Birket el Had oder dem Pilgrimsbrunnen, von wo es nur noch drei Stunden Weges nach Kairo waren—Man hatte um diese Zeit die Karawane erwartet, und bald hatten die Kaufleute die Freude, ihre Freunde aus Kairo ihnen entgegenkommen zu sehen. Sie zogen in die Stadt durch das Tor Bebel Falch; denn es wird für eine glückliche Vorbedeutung gehalten, wenn man von Mekka kommt, durch dieses Tor einzuziehen, weil der Prophet hindurchgezogen ist.
Auf dem Markt verabschiedeten sich die vier türkischen Kaufleute von dem Fremden und dem griechischen Kaufmann Zaleukos und gingen mit ihren Freunden nach Haus. Zaleukos aber zeigte dem Fremden eine gute Karawanserei und lud ihn ein, mit ihm das Mittagsmahl zu nehmen. Der Fremde sagte zu und versprach, wenn er nur vorher sich umgekleidet habe, zu erscheinen.
Der Grieche hatte alle Anstalten getroffen, den Fremden, welchen er auf der Reise liebgewonnen hatte, gut zu bewirten, und als die Speisen und Getränke in gehöriger Ordnung aufgestellt waren, setzte er sich, seinen Gast zu erwarten.
Langsam und schweren Schrittes hörte er ihn den Gang, der zu seinem Gemach führte, heraufkommen. Er erhob sich, um ihm freundlich entgegenzusehen und ihn an der Schwelle zu bewillkommnen; aber voll Entsetzen fuhr er zurück, als er die Türe öffnete; denn jener schreckliche Rotmantel trat ihm entgegen; er warf noch einen Blick auf ihn, es war keine Täuschung; dieselbe hohe, gebietende Gestalt, die Larve, aus welcher ihn die dunklen Augen anblitzten, der rote Mantel mit der goldenen Stickerei waren ihm nur allzuwohl bekannt aus den schrecklichsten Stunden seines Lebens.
Widerstreitende Gefühle wogten in Zaleukos Brust; er hatte sich mit diesem Bild seiner Erinnerung längst ausgesöhnt und ihm vergeben, und doch riß sein Anblick alle seine Wunden wieder auf; alle jene qualvollen Stunden der Todesangst, jener Gram, der die Blüte seines Lebens vergiftete, zogen im Flug eines Augenblicks an seiner Seele vorüber.
„Was willst du, Schrecklicher?“ rief der Grieche aus, als die Erscheinung noch immer regungslos auf der Schwelle stand. „Weiche schnell von hinnen, daß ich dir nicht fluche!“
„Zaleukos!“ sprach eine bekannte Stimme unter der Larve hervor. „Zaleukos! So empfängst du deinen Gastfreund?“ Der Sprechende nahm die Larve ab, schlug den Mantel zurück; es war Selim Baruch, der Fremde.
Aber Zaleukos schien noch nicht beruhigt, ihm graute vor dem Fremden; denn nur zu deutlich hatte er in ihm den Unbekannten von der Ponte vecchio erkannt; aber die alte Gewohnheit der Gastfreundschaft siegte; er winkte schweigend dem Fremden, sich zu ihm ans Mahl zu setzen.
„Ich errate deine Gedanken“, nahm dieser das Wort, als sie sich gesetzt hatten. „Deine Augen sehen fragend auf mich—ich hätte schweigen und mich deinen Blicken nie mehr zeigen können, aber ich bin dir Rechenschaft schuldig, und darum wagte ich es auch, auf die Gefahr hin, daß du mir fluchtest, vor dir in meiner alten Gestalt zu erscheinen. Du sagtest einst zu mir: Der Glaube meiner Väter befiehlt mir, ihn zu lieben, auch ist er wohl unglücklicher als ich; glaube dieses, mein Freund, und höre meine Rechtfertigung!
Ich muß weit ausholen, um mich dir ganz verständlich zu machen. Ich bin in Alessandria von christlichen Eltern geboren. Mein Vater, der jüngere Sohn eines alten, berühmten französischen Hauses, war Konsul seines Landes in Alessandria. Ich wurde von meinem zehnten Jahre an in Frankreich bei einem Bruder meiner Mutter erzogen und verließ erst einige Jahre nach dem Ausbruch der Revolution mein Vaterland, um mit meinem Oheim, der in dem Lande seiner Ahnen nicht mehr sicher war, über dem Meer bei meinen Eltern eine Zuflucht zu suchen. Voll Hoffnung, die Ruhe und den Frieden, den uns das empörte Volk der Franzosen entrissen, im elterlichen Hause wiederzufinden, landeten wir. Aber ach! Ich fand nicht alles in meines Vaters Hause, wie es sein sollte; die äußeren Stürme der bewegten Zeit waren zwar noch nicht bis hierher gelangt, desto unerwarteter hatte das Unglück mein Haus im innersten Herzen heimgesucht. Mein Bruder, ein junger, hoffnungsvoller Mann, erster Sekretär meines Vaters, hatte sich erst seit kurzem mit einem jungen Mädchen, der Tochter eines florentinischen Edelmanns, der in unserer Nachbarschaft wohnte, verheiratet; zwei Tage vor unserer Ankunft war diese auf einmal verschwunden, ohne daß weder unsere Familie noch ihr Vater die geringste Spur von ihr auffinden konnten. Man glaubte endlich, sie habe sich auf einem Spaziergang zu weit gewagt und sei in Räuberhände gefallen. Beinahe tröstlicher wäre dieser Gedanke für meinen armen Bruder gewesen als die Wahrheit, die uns nur bald kund wurde. Die Treulose hatte sich mit einem jungen Neapolitaner, den sie im Hause ihres Vaters kennengelernt hatte, eingeschifft. Mein Bruder, aufs äußerste empört über diesen Schritt, bot alles auf, die Schuldige zur Strafe zu ziehen; doch vergebens; seine Versuche, die in Neapel und Florenz Aufsehen erregt hatten, dienten nur dazu, sein und unser aller Unglück zu vollenden. Der florentinische Edelmann reiste in sein Vaterland zurück, zwar mit dem Vorgeben, meinem Bruder Recht zu verschaffen, der Tat nach aber, um uns zu verderben. Er schlug in Florenz alle jene Untersuchungen, welche mein Bruder angeknüpft hatte, nieder und wußte seinen Einfluß, den er auf alle Art sich verschafft hatte, so gut zu benützen, daß mein Vater und mein Bruder ihrer Regierung verdächtig gemacht und durch die schändlichsten Mittel gefangen, nach Frankreich geführt und dort vom Beil des Henkers getötet wurden. Meine arme Mutter verfiel in Wahnsinn, und erst nach zehn langen Monaten erlöste sie der Tod von ihrem schrecklichen Zustand, der aber in den letzten Tagen zu vollem, klarem Bewußtsein geworden war. So stand ich jetzt ganz allein in der Welt, aber nur ein Gedanke beschäftigte meine Seele, nur ein Gedanke ließ mich meine Trauer vergessen, es war jene mächtige Flamme, die meine Mutter in ihrer letzten Stunde in mir angefacht hatte.
In den letzten Stunden war, wie ich dir sagte, ihr Bewußtsein zurückgekehrt; sie ließ mich rufen und sprach mit Ruhe von unserem Schicksal und ihrem Ende. Dann aber ließ sie alle aus dem Zimmer gehen, richtete sich mit feierlicher Miene von ihrem ärmlichen Lager auf und sagte, ich könne mir ihren Segen erwerben, wenn ich ihr schwöre, etwas auszuführen, das sie mir auftragen würde—Ergriffen von den Worten der sterbenden Mutter, gelobte ich mit einem Eide zu tun, wie sie mir sagen werde. Sie brach nun in Verwünschungen gegen den Florentiner und seine Tochter aus und legte mir mit den fürchterlichsten Drohungen ihres Fluches auf, mein unglückliches Haus an ihm zu rächen. Sie starb in meinen Armen. Jener Gedanke der Rache hatte schon lange in meiner Seele geschlummert; jetzt erwachte er mit aller Macht. Ich sammelte den Rest meines väterlichen Vermögens und schwor mir, alles an meine Rache zu setzen oder selbst mit unterzugehen.
Bald war ich in Florenz, wo ich mich so geheim als möglich aufhielt; mein Plan war um vieles erschwert worden durch die Lage, in welcher sich meine Feinde befanden. Der alte Florentiner war Gouverneur geworden und hatte so alle Mittel in der Hand, sobald er das geringste ahnte, mich zu verderben. Ein Zufall kam mir zu Hilfe. Eines Abends sah ich einen Menschen in bekannter Livree durch die Straßen gehen; sein unsicherer Gang, sein finsterer Blick und das halblaut herausgestoßene „Santo sacramento“, „Maledetto diavolo“ ließen mich den alten Pietro, einen Diener des Florentiners, den ich schon in Alessandria gekannt hatte, erkennen. Ich war nicht in Zweifel, daß er über seinen Herrn in Zorn geraten sei, und beschloß, seine Stimmung zu benützen. Er schien sehr überrascht, mich hier zu sehen, klagte mir sein Leiden, daß er seinem Herrn, seit er Gouverneur geworden, nichts mehr recht machen könne, und mein Gold, unterstützt von seinem Zorn, brachte ihn bald auf meine Seite. Das Schwierigste war jetzt beseitigt; ich hatte einen Mann in meinem Solde, der mir zu jeder Stunde die Türe meines Feindes öffnete, und nun reifte mein Racheplan immer schneller heran. Das Leben des alten Florentiners schien mir ein zu geringes Gewicht, dem Untergang meines Hauses gegenüber, zu haben. Sein Liebstes mußte er gemordet sehen, und dies war Bianka, seine Tochter. Hatte ja sie so schändlich an meinem Bruder gefrevelt, war ja doch sie die Ursache unseres Unglücks. Gar erwünscht kam sogar meinem rachedürstigen Herzen die Nachricht, daß in dieser Zeit Bianka zum zweitenmal sich vermählen wollte, es war beschlossen, sie mußte sterben. Aber mir selbst graute vor der Tat, und auch Pietro traute sich zu wenig Kraft zu; darum spähten wir umher nach einem Mann, der das Geschäft vollbringen könne. Unter den Florentinern wagte ich keinen zu dingen, denn gegen den Gouverneur würde keiner etwas Solches unternommen haben. Da fiel Pietro der Plan ein, den ich nachher ausgeführt habe; zugleich schlug er dich als Fremden und Arzt als den Tauglichsten vor. Den Verlauf der Sache weißt du. Nur an deiner großen Vorsicht und Ehrlichkeit schien mein Unternehmen zu scheitern. Daher der Zufall mit dem Mantel.
Pietro öffnete uns das Pförtchen an dem Palast des Gouverneurs; er hätte uns auch ebenso heimlich wieder hinausgeleitet, wenn wir nicht, durch den schrecklichen Anblick, der sich uns durch die Türspalte darbot, erschreckt, entflohen wären. Von Schrecken und Reue gejagt, war ich über zweihundert Schritte fortgerannt, bis ich auf den Stufen einer Kirche niedersank. Dort erst sammelte ich mich wieder, und mein erster Gedanke warst du und dein schreckliches Schicksal, wenn man dich in dem Hause fände. Ich schlich an den Palast, aber weder von Pietro noch von dir konnte ich eine Spur entdecken; das Pförtchen aber war offen, so konnte ich wenigstens hoffen, daß du die Gelegenheit zur Flucht benützt haben könntest.
Als aber der Tag anbrach, ließ mich die Angst vor der Entdeckung und ein unabweisbares Gefühl von Reue nicht mehr in den Mauern von Florenz. Ich eilte nach Rom. Aber denke dir meine Bestürzung, als man dort nach einigen Tagen überall diese Geschichte erzählte mit dem Beisatz, man habe den Mörder, einen griechischen Arzt, gefangen. Ich kehrte in banger Besorgnis nach Florenz zurück; denn schien mir meine Rache schon vorher zu stark, so verfluchte ich sie jetzt, denn sie war mir durch dein Leben allzu teuer erkauft. Ich kam an demselben Tage an, der dich der Hand beraubte. Ich schweige von dem, was ich fühlte, als ich dich das Schafott besteigen und so heldenmütig leiden sah. Aber damals, als dein Blut in Strömen aufspritzte, war der Entschluß fest in mir, dir deine übrigen Lebenstage zu versüßen. Was weiter geschehen ist, weißt du, nur das bleibt mir noch zu sagen übrig, warum ich diese Reise mit dir machte.
Als eine schwere Last drückte mich der Gedanke, daß du mir noch immer nicht vergeben habest; darum entschloß ich mich, viele Tage mit dir zu leben und dir endlich Rechenschaft abzulegen von dem, was ich mit dir getan.“
Schweigend hatte der Grieche seinen Gast angehört; mit sanftem Blick bot er ihm, als er geendet hatte, seine Rechte. „Ich wußte wohl, daß du unglücklicher sein müßtest als ich, denn jene grausame Tat wird wie eine dunkle Wolke ewig deine Tage verfinstern; ich vergebe dir von Herzen. Aber erlaube mir noch eine Frage: Wie kommst du unter dieser Gestalt in die Wüste? Was fingst du an, nachdem du in Konstantinopel mir das Haus gekauft hattest?“
„Ich ging nach Alessandria zurück“, antwortete der Gefragte. „Haß gegen alle Menschen tobte in meiner Brust, brennender Haß besonders gegen jene Nationen, die man die gebildeten nennt. Glaube mir, unter meinen Moslemiten war mir wohler! Kaum war ich einige Monate in Alessandria, als jene Landung meiner Landsleute erfolgte.
Ich sah in ihnen nur die Henker meines Vaters und meines Bruders; darum sammelte ich einige gleichgesinnte junge Leute meiner Bekanntschaft und schloß mich jenen tapferen Mamelucken an, die so oft der Schrecken des französischen Heeres wurden. Als der Feldzug beendigt war, konnte ich mich nicht entschließen, zu den Künsten des Friedens zurückzukehren. Ich lebte mit einer kleinen Anzahl gleichdenkender Freunde ein unstetes und flüchtiges, dem Kampf und der Jagd geweihtes Leben; ich lebe zufrieden unter diesen Leuten, die mich wie ihren Fürsten ehren; denn wenn meine Asiaten auch nicht so gebildet sind wie Eure Europäer, so sind sie doch weit entfernt von Neid und Verleumdung, von Selbstsucht und Ehrgeiz.“
Zaleukos dankte dem Fremden für seine Mitteilung, aber er verbarg ihm nicht, daß er es für seinen Stand, für seine Bildung angemessener fände, wenn er in christlichen, in europäischen Ländern leben und wirken würde. Er faßte seine Hand und bat ihn, mit ihm zu ziehen, bei ihm zu leben und zu sterben.
Gerührt sah ihn der Gastfreund an. „Daraus erkenne ich“, sagte er, „daß du mir ganz vergeben hast, daß du mich liebst. Nimm meinen innigsten Dank dafür!“ Er sprang auf und stand in seiner ganzen Größe vor dem Griechen, dem vor dem kriegerischen Anstand, den dunkel blitzenden Augen, der tiefen Stimme seines Gastes beinahe graute. „Dein Vorschlag ist schön“, sprach jener weiter, „er möchte für jeden andern lockend sein—ich kann ihn nicht benützen. Schon steht mein Roß gesattelt, erwarten mich meine Diener; lebe wohl, Zaleukos!“ Die Freunde, die das Schicksal so wunderbar zusammengeführt, umarmten sich zum Abschied. „Und wie nenne ich dich? Wie heißt mein Gastfreund, der auf ewig in meinem Gedächtnis leben wird?“ fragte der Grieche.
Der Fremde sah ihn lange an, drückte ihm noch einmal die Hand und sprach: „Man nennt mich den Herrn der Wüste; ich bin der Räuber Orbasan.“


DIE GESCHICHTE VOM KALIF STORCH

Der Kalif Chasid zu Bagdad saß einmal an einem schönen Nachmittag behaglich auf seinem Sofa; er hatte ein wenig geschlafen, denn es war ein heißer Tag, und sah nun nach seinem Schläfchen recht heiter aus. Er rauchte aus einer langen Pfeife von Rosenholz, trank hier und da ein wenig Kaffee, den ihm ein Sklave einschenkte, und strich sich allemal vergnügt den Bart, wenn es ihm geschmeckt hatte. Kurz, man sah dem Kalifen an, daß es ihm recht wohl war. Um diese Stunde konnte man gar gut mit ihm reden, weil er da immer recht mild und leutselig war, deswegen besuchte ihn auch sein Großwesir Mansor alle Tage um diese Zeit. An diesem Nachmittage nun kam er auch, sah aber sehr nachdenklich aus, ganz gegen seine Gewohnheit. Der Kalif tat die Pfeife ein wenig aus dem Mund und sprach: „Warum machst du ein so nachdenkliches Gesicht, Großwesir?“
Der Großwesir schlug seine Arme kreuzweis über die Brust, verneigte sich vor seinem Herrn und antwortete: „Herr, ob ich ein nachdenkliches Gesicht mache, weiß ich nicht, aber da drunten am Schloß steht ein Krämer, der hat so schöne Sachen, daß es mich ärgert, nicht viel überflüssiges Geld zu haben.“
Der Kalif, der seinem Großwesir schon lange gerne eine Freude gemacht hätte, schickte seinen schwarzen Sklaven hinunter, um den Krämer heraufzuholen. Bald kam der Sklave mit dem Krämer zurück. Dieser war ein kleiner, dicker Mann, schwarzbraun im Gesicht und in zerlumptem Anzug. Er trug einen Kasten, in welchem er allerhand Waren hatte, Perlen und Ringe, reichbeschlagene Pistolen, Becher und Kämme. Der Kalif und sein Wesir musterten alles durch, und der Kalif kaufte endlich für sich und Mansor schöne Pistolen, für die Frau des Wesirs aber einen Kamm. Als der Krämer seinen Kasten schon wieder zumachen wollte, sah der Kalif eine kleine Schublade und fragte, ob da auch noch Waren seien. Der Krämer zog die Schublade heraus und zeigte darin eine Dose mit schwärzlichem Pulver und ein Papier mit sonderbarer Schrift, die weder der Kalif noch Mansor lesen konnte. „Ich bekam einmal diese zwei Stücke von einem Kaufmanne, der sie in Mekka auf der Straße fand“, sagte der Krämer, „Ich weiß nicht, was sie enthalten; euch stehen sie um geringen Preis zu Dienst, ich kann doch nichts damit anfangen.“
Der Kalif, der in seiner Bibliothek gerne alte Manuskripte hatte, wenn er sie auch nicht lesen konnte, kaufte Schrift und Dose und entließ den Krämer. Der Kalif aber dachte, er möchte gerne wissen, was die Schrift enthalte, und, fragte den Wesir, ob er keinen kenne, der es entziffern könnte.
„Gnädigster Herr und Gebieter“, antwortete dieser, „an der großen Moschee wohnt ein Mann, er heißt Selim, der Gelehrte, der versteht alle Sprachen, laß ihn kommen, vielleicht kennt er diese geheimnisvollen Züge.“
Der Gelehrte Selim war bald herbeigeholt. „Selim“, sprach zu ihm der Kalif, „Selim, man sagt, du seiest sehr gelehrt; guck einmal ein wenig in diese Schrift, ob du sie lesen kannst; kannst du sie lesen, so bekommst du ein neues Festkleid von mir, kannst du es nicht, so bekommst du zwölf Backenstreiche und fünfundzwanzig auf die Fußsohlen, weil man dich dann umsonst Selim, den Gelehrten, nennt.“
Selim verneigte sich und sprach: „Dein Wille geschehe, o Herr!“ Lange betrachtete er die Schrift, plötzlich aber rief er aus: „Das ist Lateinisch, o Herr, oder ich laß mich hängen.“ „Sag, was drinsteht“, befahl der Kalif, „wenn es Lateinisch ist.“
Selim fing an zu übersetzen: „Mensch, der du dieses findest, preise Allah für seine Gnade. Wer von dem Pulver in dieser Dose schnupft und dazu spricht: mutabor, der kann sich in jedes Tier verwandeln und versteht auch die Sprache der Tiere.
Will er wieder in seine menschliche Gestalt zurückkehren, so neige er sich dreimal gen Osten und spreche jenes Wort; aber hüte dich, wenn du verwandelt bist, daß du nicht lachest, sonst verschwindet das Zauberwort gänzlich aus deinem Gedächtnis, und du bleibst ein Tier.“
Als Selim, der Gelehrte, also gelesen hatte, war der Kalif über die Maßen vergnügt. Er ließ den Gelehrten schwören, niemandem etwas von dem Geheimnis zu sagen, schenkte ihm ein schönes Kleid und entließ ihn. Zu seinem Großwesir aber sagte er: „Das heiß’ ich gut einkaufen, Mansor! Wie freue ich mich, bis ich ein Tier bin. Morgen früh kommst du zu mir; wir gehen dann miteinander aufs Feld, schnupfen etwas Weniges aus meiner Dose und belauschen dann, was in der Luft und im Wasser, im Wald und Feld gesprochen wird!“
Kaum hatte am anderen Morgen der Kalif Chasid gefrühstückt und sich angekleidet, als schon der Großwesir erschien, ihn, wie er befohlen, auf dem Spaziergang zu begleiten. Der Kalif steckte die Dose mit dem Zauberpulver in den Gürtel, und nachdem er seinem Gefolge befohlen, zurückzubleiben, machte er sich mit dem Großwesir ganz allein auf den Weg. Sie gingen zuerst durch die weiten Gärten des Kalifen, spähten aber vergebens nach etwas Lebendigem, um ihr Kunststück zu probieren. Der Wesir schlug endlich vor, weiter hinaus an einen Teich zu gehen, wo er schon oft viele Tiere, namentlich Störche, gesehen habe, die durch ihr gravitätisches Wesen und ihr Geklapper immer seine Aufmerksamkeit erregt hatten.
Der Kalif billigte den Vorschlag seines Wesirs und ging mit ihm dem Teich zu. Als sie dort angekommen waren, sahen sie einen Storch ernsthaft auf und ab gehen, Frösche suchend und hier und da etwas vor sich hinklappernd. Zugleich sahen sie auch weit oben in der Luft einen anderen Storch dieser Gegend zuschweben.
„Ich wette meinen Bart, gnädigster Herr“, sagte der Großwesir, „wenn nicht diese zwei Langfüßler ein schönes Gespräch miteinander führen werden. Wie wäre es, wenn wir Störche würden?“
„Wohl gesprochen!“ antwortete der Kalif. „Aber vorher wollen wir noch einmal betrachten, wie man wieder Mensch wird.—Richtig! Dreimal gen Osten geneigt und mutabor gesagt, so bin ich wieder Kalif und du Wesir. Aber nur um Himmels willen nicht gelacht, sonst sind wir verloren!“
Während der Kalif also sprach, sah er den anderen Storch über ihrem Haupte schweben und langsam sich zur Erde lassen. Schnell zog er die Dose aus dem Gürtel, nahm eine gute Prise, bot sie dem Großwesir dar, der gleichfalls schnupfte, und beide riefen: mutabor!
Da schrumpften ihre Beine ein und wurden dünn und rot, die schönen gelben Pantoffeln des Kalifen und seines Begleiters wurden unförmliche Storchfüße, die Arme wurden zu Flügeln, der Hals fuhr aus den Achseln und ward eine Elle lang, der Bart war verschwunden, und den Körper bedeckten weiche Federn.
„Ihr habt einen hübschen Schnabel, Herr Großwesir“, sprach nach langem Erstaunen der Kalif. „Beim Bart des Propheten, so etwas habe ich in meinem Leben nicht gesehen.“ „Danke untertänigst“, erwiderte der Großwesir, indem er sich bückte, „aber wenn ich es wagen darf, möchte ich behaupten, Eure Hoheit sehen als Storch beinahe noch hübscher aus denn als Kalif. Aber kommt, wenn es Euch gefällig ist, daß wir unsere Kameraden dort belauschen und erfahren, ob wir wirklich Storchisch können.“
Indem war der andere Storch auf der Erde angekommen; er putzte sich mit dem Schnabel seine Füße, legte seine Federn zurecht und ging auf den ersten Storch zu. Die beiden neuen Störche aber beeilten sich, in ihre Nähe zu kommen, und vernahmen zu ihrem Erstaunen folgendes Gespräch:
„Guten Morgen, Frau Langbein, so früh schon auf der Wiese?“
„Schönen Dank, liebe Klapperschnabel! Ich habe mir nur ein kleines Frühstück geholt. Ist Euch vielleicht ein Viertelchen Eidechs gefällig oder ein Froschschenkelein?“
„Danke gehorsamst; habe heute gar keinen Appetit. Ich komme auch wegen etwas ganz anderem auf die Wiese. Ich soll heute vor den Gästen meines Vaters tanzen, und da will ich mich im stillen ein wenig üben.“
Zugleich schritt die junge Störchin in wunderlichen Bewegungen durch das Feld. Der Kalif und Mansor sahen ihr verwundert nach; als sie aber in malerischer Stellung auf einem Fuß stand und mit den Flügeln anmutig dazu wedelte, da konnten sich die beiden nicht mehr halten; ein unaufhaltsames Gelächter brach aus ihren Schnäbeln hervor, von dem sie sich erst nach langer Zeit erholten. Der Kalif faßte sich zuerst wieder: „Das war einmal ein Spaß“, rief er, „der nicht mit Gold zu bezahlen ist; schade, daß die Tiere durch unser Gelächter sich haben verscheuchen lassen, sonst hätten sie gewiß auch noch gesungen!“
Aber jetzt fiel es dem Großwesir ein, daß das Lachen während der Verwandlung verboten war. Er teilte seine Angst deswegen dem Kalifen mit. „Potz Mekka und Medina! Das wäre ein schlechter Spaß, wenn ich ein Storch bleiben müßte! Besinne dich doch auf das dumme Wort, ich bring’ es nicht heraus.“
„Dreimal gen Osten müssen wir uns bücken und dazu sprechen: mu—mu—mu—“
Sie stellten sich gegen Osten und bückten sich in einem fort, daß ihre Schnäbel beinahe die Erde berührten; aber, o Jammer! Das Zauberwort war ihnen entfallen, und so oft sich auch der Kalif bückte, so sehnlich auch sein Wesir mu—mu dazu rief, jede Erinnerung daran war verschwunden, und der arme Chasid und sein Wesir waren und blieben Störche.
Traurig wandelten die Verzauberten durch die Felder, sie wußten gar nicht, was sie in ihrem Elend anfangen sollten. Aus ihrer Storchenhaut konnten sie nicht heraus, in die Stadt zurück konnten sie auch nicht, um sich zu erkennen zu geben; denn wer hätte einem Storch geglaubt, daß er der Kalif sei, und wenn man es auch geglaubt hätte, würden die Einwohner von Bagdad einen Storch zum Kalif gewollt haben?
So schlichen sie mehrere Tage umher und ernährten sich kümmerlich von Feldfrüchten, die sie aber wegen ihrer langen Schnäbel nicht gut verspeisen konnten. Auf Eidechsen und Frösche hatten sie übrigens keinen Appetit, denn sie befürchteten, mit solchen Leckerbissen sich den Magen zu verderben. Ihr einziges Vergnügen in dieser traurigen Lage war, daß sie fliegen konnten, und so flogen sie oft auf die Dächer von Bagdad, um zu sehen, was darin vorging.
In den ersten Tagen bemerkten sie große Unruhe und Trauer in den Straßen; aber ungefähr am vierten Tag nach ihrer Verzauberung saßen sie auf dem Palast des Kalifen, da sahen sie unten in der Straße einen prächtigen Aufzug; Trommeln und Pfeifen ertönten, ein Mann in einem goldbestickten Scharlachmantel saß auf einem geschmückten Pferd, umgeben von glänzenden Dienern, halb Bagdad sprang ihm nach, und alle schrien: „Heil Mizra, dem Herrscher von Bagdad!“
Da sahen die beiden Störche auf dem Dache des Palastes einander an, und der Kalif Chasid sprach: „Ahnst du jetzt, warum ich verzaubert bin, Großwesir? Dieser Mizra ist der Sohn meines Todfeindes, des mächtigen Zauberers Kaschnur, der mir in einer bösen Stunde Rache schwur. Aber noch gebe ich die Hoffnung nicht auf—Komm mit mir, du treuer Gefährte meines Elends, wir wollen zum Grabe des Propheten wandern, vielleicht, daß an heiliger Stätte der Zauber gelöst wird.“
Sie erhoben sich vom Dach des Palastes und flogen der Gegend von Medina zu.
Mit dem Fliegen wollte es aber nicht gar gut gehen; denn die beiden Störche hatten noch wenig Übung. „O Herr“, ächzte nach ein paar Stunden der Großwesir, „ich halte es mit Eurer Erlaubnis nicht mehr lange aus; Ihr fliegt gar zu schnell! Auch ist es schon Abend, und wir täten wohl, ein Unterkommen für die Nacht zu suchen.“
Chasid gab der Bitte seines Dieners Gehör; und da er unten im Tale eine Ruine erblickte, die ein Obdach zu gewähren schien, so flogen sie dahin. Der Ort, wo sie sich für diese Nacht niedergelassen hatten, schien ehemals ein Schloß gewesen zu sein. Schöne Säulen ragten unter den Trümmern hervor, mehrere Gemächer, die noch ziemlich erhalten waren, zeugten von der ehemaligen Pracht des Hauses. Chasid und sein Begleiter gingen durch die Gänge umher, um sich ein trockenes Plätzchen zu suchen; plötzlich blieb der Storch Mansor stehen. „Herr und Gebieter“, flüsterte er leise, „wenn es nur nicht töricht für einen Großwesir, noch mehr aber für einen Storch wäre, sich vor Gespenstern zu fürchten! Mir ist ganz unheimlich zumute; denn hier neben hat es ganz vernehmlich geseufzt und gestöhnt.“ Der Kalif blieb nun auch stehen und hörte ganz deutlich ein leises Weinen, das eher einem Menschen als einem Tiere anzugehören schien. Voll Erwartung wollte er der Gegend zugehen, woher die Klagetöne kamen; der Wesir aber packte ihn mit dem Schnabel am Flügel und bat ihn flehentlich, sich nicht in neue, unbekannte Gefahren zu stürzen. Doch vergebens! Der Kalif, dem auch unter dem Storchenflügel ein tapferes Herz schlug, riß sich mit Verlust einiger Federn los und eilte in einen finsteren Gang. Bald war er an einer Tür angelangt, die nur angelehnt schien und woraus er deutliche Seufzer mit ein wenig Geheul vernahm. Er stieß mit dem Schnabel die Türe auf, blieb aber überrascht auf der Schwelle stehen. In dem verfallenen Gemach, das nur durch ein kleines Gitterfenster spärlich erleuchtet war, sah er eine große Nachteule am Boden sitzen. Dicke Tränen rollten ihr aus den großen, runden Augen, und mit heiserer Stimme stieß sie ihre Klagen zu dem krummen Schnabel heraus. Als sie aber den Kalifen und seinen Wesir, der indes auch herbeigeschlichen war, erblickte, erhob sie ein lautes Freudengeschrei. Zierlich wischte sie mit dem braungefleckten Flügel die Tränen aus dem Auge, und zu dem größten Erstaunen der beiden rief sie in gutem menschlichem Arabisch: „Willkommen, ihr Störche! Ihr seid mir ein gutes Zeichen meiner Errettung; denn durch Störche werde mir ein großes Glück kommen, ist mir einst prophezeit worden!“
Als sich der Kalif von seinem Erstaunen erholt hatte, bückte er sich mit seinem langen Hals, brachte seine dünnen Füße in eine zierliche Stellung und sprach: „Nachteule! Deinen Worten nach darf ich glauben, eine Leidensgefährtin in dir zu sehen. Aber ach! Deine Hoffnung, daß durch uns deine Rettung kommen werde, ist vergeblich. Du wirst unsere Hilflosigkeit selbst erkennen, wenn du unsere Geschichte hörst.“ Die Nachteule bat ihn zu erzählen, was der Kalif sogleich tat.
Als der Kalif der Eule seine Geschichte vorgetragen hatte, dankte sie ihm und sagte: „Vernimm auch meine Geschichte und höre, wie ich nicht weniger unglücklich bin als du. Mein Vater ist der König von Indien, ich, seine einzige unglückliche Tochter, heiße Lusa. Jener Zauberer Kaschnur, der euch verzauberte, hat auch mich ins Unglück gestürzt. Er kam eines Tages zu meinem Vater und begehrte mich zur Frau für seinen Sohn Mizra. Mein Vater aber, der ein hitziger Mann ist, ließ ihn die Treppe hinunterwerfen. Der Elende wußte sich unter einer anderen Gestalt wieder in meine Nähe zu schleichen, und als ich einst in meinem Garten Erfrischungen zu mir nehmen wollte, brachte er mir, als Sklave verkleidet, einen Trank bei, der mich in diese abscheuliche Gestalt verwandelte. Vor Schrecken ohnmächtig, brachte er mich hierher und rief mir mit schrecklicher Stimme in die Ohren:
,Da sollst du bleiben, häßlich, selbst von den Tieren verachtet, bis an dein Ende, oder bis einer aus freiem Willen dich, selbst in dieser schrecklichen Gestalt, zur Gattin begehrt. So räche ich mich an dir und deinem stolzen Vater.‘
Seitdem sind viele Monate verflossen. Einsam und traurig lebe ich als Einsiedlerin in diesem Gemäuer, verabscheut von der Welt, selbst den Tieren ein Greuel; die schöne Natur ist vor mir verschlossen; denn ich bin blind am Tage, und nur, wenn der Mond sein bleiches Licht über dies Gemäuer ausgießt, fällt der verhüllende Schleier von meinem Auge.“
Die Eule hatte geendet und wischte sich mit dem Flügel wieder die Augen aus, denn die Erzählung ihrer Leiden hatte ihr Tränen entlockt.
Der Kalif war bei der Erzählung der Prinzessin in tiefes Nachdenken versunken. „Wenn mich nicht alles täuscht“, sprach er, „so findet zwischen unserem Unglück ein geheimer Zusammenhang statt; aber wo finde ich den Schlüssel zu diesem Rätsel?“
Die Eule antwortete ihm: „O Herr! Auch mir ahnet dies; denn es ist mir einst in meiner frühesten Jugend von einer weisen Frau prophezeit worden, daß ein Storch mir ein großes Glück bringen werde, und ich wüßte vielleicht, wie wir uns retten könnten.“ Der Kalif war sehr erstaunt und fragte, auf welchem Wege sie meine. „Der Zauberer, der uns beide unglücklich gemacht hat“, sagte sie, „kommt alle Monate einmal in diese Ruinen. Nicht weit von diesem Gemach ist ein Saal. Dort pflegt er dann mit vielen Genossen zu schmausen. Schon oft habe ich sie dort belauscht. Sie erzählen dann einander ihre schändlichen Werke; vielleicht, daß er dann das Zauberwort, das ihr vergessen habt, ausspricht.“
„O, teuerste Prinzessin“, rief der Kalif, „sag an, wann kommt er, und wo ist der Saal?“
Die Eule schwieg einen Augenblick und sprach dann: „Nehmet es nicht ungütig, aber nur unter einer Bedingung kann ich Euern Wunsch erfüllen.“
„Sprich aus! Sprich aus!“ schrie Chasid. „Befiehl, es ist mir jede recht.“
„Nämlich, ich möchte auch gern zugleich frei sein; dies kann aber nur geschehen, wenn einer von euch mir seine Hand reicht.“
Die Störche schienen über den Antrag etwas betroffen zu sein, und der Kalif winkte seinem Diener, ein wenig mit ihm hinauszugehen.
„Großwesir“, sprach vor der Türe der Kalif, „das ist ein dummer Handel; aber Ihr könntet sie schon nehmen.“
„So“, antwortete dieser, „daß mir meine Frau, wenn ich nach Hause komme, die Augen auskratzt? Auch bin ich ein alter Mann, und Ihr seid noch jung und unverheiratet und könnet eher einer jungen, schönen Prinzessin die Hand geben.“
„Das ist es eben“, seufzte der Kalif, indem er traurig die Flügel hängen ließ, „wer sagt dir denn, daß sie jung und schön ist? Das heißt eine Katze im Sack kaufen!“
Sie redeten einander gegenseitig noch lange zu; endlich aber, als der Kalif sah, daß sein Wesir lieber Storch bleiben als die Eule heiraten wollte, entschloß er sich, die Bedingung lieber selbst zu erfüllen. Die Eule war hocherfreut. Sie gestand ihnen, daß sie zu keiner besseren Zeit hätten kommen können, weil wahrscheinlich in dieser Nacht die Zauberer sich versammeln würden.
Sie verließ mit den Störchen das Gemach, um sie in jenen Saal zu führen; sie gingen lange in einem finsteren Gang hin; endlich strahlte ihnen aus einer halbverfallenen Mauer ein heller Schein entgegen. Als sie dort angelangt waren, riet ihnen die Eule, sich ganz ruhig zu verhalten. Sie konnten von der Lücke, an welcher sie standen, einen großen Saal übersehen. Er war ringsum mit Säulen geschmückt und prachtvoll verziert. Viele farbige Lampen ersetzten das Licht des Tages. In der Mitte des Saales stand ein runder Tisch, mit vielen und ausgesuchten Speisen besetzt. Rings um den Tisch zog sich ein Sofa, auf welchem acht Männer saßen. In einem dieser Männer erkannten die Störche jenen Krämer wieder, der ihnen das Zauberpulver verkauft hatte. Sein Nebensitzer forderte ihn auf, ihnen seine neuesten Taten zu erzählen. Er erzählte unter anderen auch die Geschichte des Kalifen und seines Wesirs.
„Was für ein Wort hast du ihnen denn aufgegeben?“ fragte ihn ein anderer Zauberer. „Ein recht schweres lateinisches, es heißt mutabor.“
Als die Störche an der Mauerlücke dieses hörten, kamen sie vor Freuden beinahe außer sich. Sie liefen auf ihren langen Füßen so schnell dem Tore der Ruine zu, daß die Eule kaum folgen konnte. Dort sprach der Kalif gerührt zu der Eule: „Retterin meines Lebens und des Lebens meines Freundes, nimm zum ewigen Dank für das, was du an uns getan, mich zum Gemahl an!“ Dann aber wandte er sich nach Osten. Dreimal bückten die Störche ihre langen Hälse der Sonne entgegen, die soeben hinter dem Gebirge heraufstieg: „Mutabor!“ riefen sie, im Nu waren sie verwandelt, und in der hohen Freude des neugeschenkten Lebens lagen Herr und Diener lachend und weinend einander in den Armen.
Wer beschreibt aber ihr Erstaunen, als sie sich umsahen? Eine schöne Dame, herrlich geschmückt, stand vor ihnen. Lächelnd gab sie dem Kalifen die Hand. „Erkennt Ihr Eure Nachteule nicht mehr?“ sagte sie. Sie war es; der Kalif war von ihrer Schönheit und Anmut entzückt.
Die drei zogen nun miteinander auf Bagdad zu. Der Kalif fand in seinen Kleidern nicht nur die Dose mit Zauberpulver, sondern auch seinen Geldbeutel. Er kaufte daher im nächsten Dorfe, was zu ihrer Reise nötig war, und so kamen sie bald an die Tore von Bagdad. Dort aber erregte die Ankunft des Kalifen großes Erstaunen. Man hatte ihn für tot ausgegeben, und das Volk war daher hocherfreut, seinen geliebten Herrscher wiederzuhaben.
Um so mehr aber entbrannte ihr Haß gegen den Betrüger Mizra. Sie zogen in den Palast und nahmen den alten Zauberer und seinen Sohn gefangen. Den Alten schickte der Kalif in dasselbe Gemach der Ruine, das die Prinzessin als Eule bewohnt hatte, und ließ ihn dort aufhängen. Dem Sohn aber, welcher nichts von den Künsten des Vaters verstand, ließ der Kalif die Wahl, ob er sterben oder schnupfen wolle. Als er das letztere wählte, bot ihm der Großwesir die Dose. Eine tüchtige Prise, und das Zauberwort des Kalifen verwandelte ihn in einen Storch. Der Kalif ließ ihn in einen eisernen Käfig sperren und in seinem Garten aufstellen.
Lange und vergnügt lebte Kalif Chasid mit seiner Frau, der Prinzessin; seine vergnügtesten Stunden waren immer die, wenn ihn der Großwesir nachmittags besuchte; da sprachen sie dann oft von ihrem Storchabenteuer, und wenn der Kalif recht heiter war, ließ er sich herab, den Großwesir nachzuahmen, wie er als Storch aussah. Er stieg dann ernsthaft, mit steifen Füßen im Zimmer auf und ab, klapperte, wedelte mit den Armen wie mit Flügeln und zeigte, wie jener sich vergeblich nach Osten geneigt und Mu—Mu—dazu gerufen habe. Für die Frau Kalifin und ihre Kinder war diese Vorstellung allemal eine große Freude; wenn aber der Kalif gar zu lange klapperte und nickte und Mu—Mu—schrie, dann drohte ihm lächelnd der Wesir: Er wolle das, was vor der Türe der Prinzessin Nachteule verhandelt worden sei, der Frau Kalifin mitteilen.
Als Selim Baruch seine Geschichte beendet hatte, bezeugten sich die Kaufleute sehr zufrieden damit. „Wahrhaftig, der Nachmittag ist uns vergangen, ohne daß wir merkten wie!“ sagte einer derselben, indem er die Decke des Zeltes zurückschlug. „Der Abendwind wehet kühl, und wir könnten noch eine gute Strecke Weges zurücklegen.“ Seine Gefährten waren damit einverstanden, die Zelte wurden abgebrochen, und die Karawane machte sich in der nämlichen Ordnung, in welcher sie herangezogen war, auf den Weg.
Sie ritten beinahe die ganze Nacht hindurch, denn es war schwül am Tage, die Nacht aber war erquicklich und sternhell. Sie kamen endlich an einem bequemen Lagerplatz an, schlugen die Zelte auf und legten sich zur Ruhe. Für den Fremden aber sorgten die Kaufleute, wie wenn er ihr wertester Gastfreund wäre. Der eine gab ihm Polster, der andere Decken, ein dritter gab ihm Sklaven, kurz, er wurde so gut bedient, als ob er zu Hause wäre. Die heißeren Stunden des Tages waren schon heraufgekommen, als sie sich wieder erhoben, und sie beschlossen einmütig, hier den Abend abzuwarten. Nachdem sie miteinander gespeist hatten, rückten sie wieder näher zusammen, und der junge Kaufmann wandte sich an den ältesten und sprach: „Selim Baruch hat uns gestern einen vergnügten Nachmittag bereitet, wie wäre es, Achmet, wenn Ihr uns auch etwas erzähltet, sei es nun aus Eurem langen Leben, das wohl viele Abenteuer aufzuweisen hat, oder sei es auch ein hübsches Märchen.“ Achmet schwieg auf diese Anrede eine Zeitlang, wie wenn er bei sich im Zweifel wäre, ob er dies oder jenes sagen sollte oder nicht; endlich fing er an zu sprechen:
„Liebe Freunde! Ihr habt euch auf dieser unserer Reise als treue Gesellen erprobt, und auch Selim verdient mein Vertrauen; daher will ich euch etwas aus meinem Leben mitteilen, das ich sonst ungern und nicht jedem erzähle: die Geschichte von dem Gespensterschiff.“


DIE GESCHICHTE VON DEM GESPENSTERSCHIFF

Mein Vater hatte einen kleinen Laden in Balsora; er war weder arm noch reich und einer von jenen Leuten, die nicht gerne etwas wagen, aus Furcht, das Wenige zu verlieren, das sie haben. Er erzog mich schlicht und recht und brachte es bald so weit, daß ich ihm an die Hand gehen konnte. Gerade als ich achtzehn Jahre alt war, als er die erste größere Spekulation machte, starb er, wahrscheinlich aus Gram, tausend Goldstücke dem Meere anvertraut zu haben. Ich mußte ihn bald nachher wegen seines Todes glücklich preisen, denn wenige Wochen hernach lief die Nachricht ein, daß das Schiff, dem mein Vater seine Güter mitgegeben hatte, versunken sei. Meinen jugendlichen Mut konnte aber dieser Unfall nicht beugen. Ich machte alles vollends zu Geld, was mein Vater hinterlassen hatte, und zog aus, um in der Fremde mein Glück zu probieren, nur von einem alten Diener meines Vaters begleitet.
Im Hafen von Balsora schifften wir uns mit günstigem Winde ein. Das Schiff, auf dem ich mich eingemietet hatte, war nach Indien bestimmt. Wir waren schon fünfzehn Tage auf der gewöhnlichen Straße gefahren, als uns der Kapitän einen Sturm verkündete. Er machte ein bedenkliches Gesicht, denn es schien, er kenne in dieser Gegend das Fahrwasser nicht genug, um einem Sturm mit Ruhe begegnen zu können. Er ließ alle Segel einziehen, und wir trieben ganz langsam hin. Die Nacht war angebrochen, war hell und kalt, und der Kapitän glaubte schon, sich in den Anzeichen des Sturmes getäuscht zu haben. Auf einmal schwebte ein Schiff, das wir vorher nicht gesehen hatten, dicht an dem unsrigen vorbei. Wildes Jauchzen und Geschrei erscholl aus dem Verdeck herüber, worüber ich mich zu dieser angstvollen Stunde vor einem Sturm nicht wenig wunderte. Aber der Kapitän an meiner Seite wurde blaß wie der Tod. „Mein Schiff ist verloren“, rief er, „dort segelt der Tod!“
Ehe ich ihn noch über diesen sonderbaren Ausruf befragen konnte, stürzten schon heulend und schreiend die Matrosen herein. „Habt ihr ihn gesehen?“ schrien sie. „Jetzt ist’s mit uns vorbei!“
Der Kapitän aber ließ Trostsprüche aus dem Koran vorlesen und setzte sich selbst ans Steuerruder. Aber vergebens! Zusehends brauste der Sturm auf, und ehe eine Stunde verging, krachte das Schiff und blieb sitzen. Die Boote wurden ausgesetzt, und kaum hatten sich die letzten Matrosen gerettet, so versank das Schiff vor unseren Augen, und als ein Bettler fuhr ich in die See hinaus. Aber der Jammer hatte noch kein Ende. Fürchterlicher tobte der Sturm; das Boot war nicht mehr zu regieren. Ich hatte meinen alten Diener fest umschlungen, und wir versprachen uns, nie voneinander zu weichen. Endlich brach der Tag an. Aber mit dem ersten Anblick der Morgenröte faßte der Wind das Boot, in welchem wir saßen, und stürzte es um. Ich habe keinen meiner Schiffsleute mehr gesehen. Der Sturz hatte mich betäubt; und als ich aufwachte, befand ich mich in den Armen meines alten treuen Dieners, der sich auf das umgeschlagene Boot gerettet und mich nachgezogen hatte. Der Sturm hatte sich gelegt. Von unserem Schiff war nichts mehr zu sehen, wohl aber entdeckten wir nicht weit von uns ein anderes Schiff, auf das die Wellen uns hintrieben. Als wir näher hinzukamen, erkannte ich das Schiff als dasselbe, das in der Nacht an uns vorbeifuhr und welches den Kapitän so sehr in Schrecken gesetzt hatte. Ich empfand ein sonderbares Grauen vor diesem Schiffe. Die Äußerung des Kapitäns, die sich so furchtbar bestätigt hatte, das öde Aussehen des Schiffes, auf dem sich, so nahe wir auch herankamen, so laut wir schrien, niemand zeigte, erschreckten mich. Doch es war unser einziges Rettungsmittel; darum priesen wir den Propheten, der uns so wundervoll erhalten hatte.
Am Vorderteil des Schiffes hing ein langes Tau herab. Mit Händen und Füßen ruderten wir darauf zu, um es zu erfassen. Endlich glückte es. Noch einmal erhob ich meine Stimme, aber immer blieb es still auf dem Schiff. Da klimmten wir an dem Tau hinauf, ich als der Jüngste voran. Aber Entsetzen! Welches Schauspiel stellte sich meinem Auge dar, als ich das Verdeck betrat! Der Boden war mit Blut gerötet, zwanzig bis dreißig Leichname in türkischen Kleidern lagen auf dem Boden, am mittleren Mastbaum stand ein Mann, reich gekleidet, den Säbel in der Hand, aber das Gesicht war blaß und verzerrt, durch die Stirn ging ein großer Nagel, der ihn an den Mastbaum heftete, auch er war tot. Schrecken fesselte meine Schritte, ich wagte kaum zu atmen. Endlich war auch mein Begleiter heraufgekommen. Auch ihn überraschte der Anblick des Verdecks, das gar nichts Lebendiges, sondern nur so viele schreckliche Tote zeigte. Wir wagten es endlich, nachdem wir in der Seelenangst zum Propheten gefleht hatten, weiter vorzuschreiten. Bei jedem Schritte sahen wir uns um, ob nicht etwas Neues, noch Schrecklicheres sich darbiete; aber alles blieb, wie es war; weit und breit nichts Lebendiges als wir und das Weltmeer. Nicht einmal laut zu sprechen wagten wir, aus Furcht, der tote, am Mast angespießte Kapitano möchte seine starren Augen nach uns hindrehen oder einer der Getöteten möchte seinen Kopf umwenden. Endlich waren wir bis an eine Treppe gekommen, die in den Schiffsraum führte. Unwillkürlich machten wir dort halt und sahen einander an, denn keiner wagte es recht, seine Gedanken zu äußern.
„O Herr“, sprach mein treuer Diener, „hier ist etwas Schreckliches geschehen. Doch wenn auch das Schiff da unten voll Mörder steckt, so will ich mich ihnen doch lieber auf Gnade und Ungnade ergeben, als längere Zeit unter diesen Toten zubringen.“ Ich dachte wie er; wir faßten uns ein Herz und stiegen voll Erwartung hinunter. Totenstille war aber auch hier, und nur unsere Schritte hallten auf der Treppe. Wir standen an der Türe der Kajüte. Ich legte mein Ohr an die Türe und lauschte; es war nichts zu hören. Ich machte auf. Das Gemach bot einen unordentlichen Anblick dar. Kleider, Waffen und andere Geräte lagen untereinander. Nichts in Ordnung. Die Mannschaft oder wenigstens der Kapitano mußten vor kurzem gezechet haben; denn es lag alles noch umher. Wir gingen weiter von Raum zu Raum, von Gemach zu Gemach, überall fanden wir herrliche Vorräte in Seide, Perlen, Zucker usw. Ich war vor Freude über diesen Anblick außer mir, denn da niemand auf dem Schiff war, glaubte ich, alles mir zueignen zu dürfen, Ibrahim aber machte mich aufmerksam darauf, daß wir wahrscheinlich noch sehr weit vom Lande seien, wohin wir allein und ohne menschliche Hilfe nicht kommen könnten.
Wir labten uns an den Speisen und Getränken, die wir in reichem Maß vorfanden, und stiegen endlich wieder aufs Verdeck. Aber hier schauderte uns immer die Haut ob dem schrecklichen Anblick der Leichen. Wir beschlossen, uns davon zu befreien und sie über Bord zu werfen; aber wie schauerlich ward uns zumut, als wir fanden, daß sich keiner aus seiner Lage bewegen ließ. Wie festgebannt lagen sie am Boden, und man hätte den Boden des Verdecks ausheben müssen, um sie zu entfernen, und dazu gebrach es uns an Werkzeugen. Auch der Kapitano ließ sich nicht von seinem Mast losmachen; nicht einmal seinen Säbel konnten wir der starren Hand entwinden. Wir brachten den Tag in trauriger Betrachtung unserer Lage zu, und als es Nacht zu werden anfing, erlaubte ich dem alten Ibrahim, sich schlafen zu legen, ich selbst aber wollte auf dem Verdeck wachen, um nach Rettung auszuspähen. Als aber der Mond heraufkam und ich nach den Gestirnen berechnete, daß es wohl um die elfte Stunde sei, überfiel mich ein so unwiderstehlicher Schlaf, daß ich unwillkürlich hinter ein Faß, das auf dem Verdeck stand, zurückfiel. Doch war es mehr Betäubung als Schlaf, denn ich hörte deutlich die See an der Seite des Schiffes anschlagen und die Segel vom Winde knarren und pfeifen. Auf einmal glaubte ich Stimmen und Männertritte auf dem Verdeck zu hören. Ich wollte mich aufrichten, um danach zu schauen. Aber eine unsichtbare Gewalt hielt meine Glieder gefesselt; nicht einmal die Augen konnte ich aufschlagen. Aber immer deutlicher wurden die Stimmen, es war mir, als wenn ein fröhliches Schiffsvolk auf dem Verdeck sich umhertriebe; mitunter glaubte ich, die kräftige Stimme eines Befehlenden zu hören, auch hörte ich Taue und Segel deutlich auf- und abziehen. Nach und nach aber schwanden mir die Sinne, ich verfiel in einen tieferen Schlaf, in dem ich nur noch ein Geräusch von Waffen zu hören glaubte, und erwachte erst, als die Sonne schon hoch stand und mir aufs Gesicht brannte. Verwundert schaute ich mich um, Sturm, Schiff, die Toten und was ich in dieser Nacht gehört hatte, kam mir wie ein Traum vor, aber als ich aufblickte, fand ich alles wie gestern. Unbeweglich lagen die Toten, unbeweglich war der Kapitano an den Mastbaum geheftet. Ich lachte über meinen Traum und stand auf, um meinen Alten zu suchen.
Dieser saß ganz nachdenklich in der Kajüte. „O Herr!“ rief er aus, als ich zu ihm hineintrat, „ich wollte lieber im tiefsten Grund des Meeres liegen, als in diesem verhexten Schiff noch eine Nacht zubringen.“ Ich fragte ihn nach der Ursache seines Kummers, und er antwortete mir: „Als ich einige Stunden geschlafen hatte, wachte ich auf und vernahm, wie man über meinem Haupt hin und her lief. Ich dachte zuerst, Ihr wäret es, aber es waren wenigstens zwanzig, die oben umherliefen; auch hörte ich rufen und schreien. Endlich kamen schwere Tritte die Treppe herab. Da wußte ich nichts mehr von mir, nur hie und da kehrte auf einige Augenblicke meine Besinnung zurück, und da sah ich dann denselben Mann, der oben am Mast angenagelt ist, an jenem Tisch dort sitzen, singend und trinkend; aber der, der in einem roten Scharlachkleid nicht weit von ihm am Boden liegt, saß neben ihm und half ihm trinken.“ Also erzählte mir mein alter Diener.
Ihr könnt mir es glauben, meine Freunde, daß mir gar nicht wohl zumute war; denn es war keine Täuschung, ich hatte ja auch die Toten gar wohl gehört. In solcher Gesellschaft zu schiffen, war mir greulich. Mein Ibrahim aber versank wieder in tiefes Nachdenken. „Jetzt hab’ ich’s!“ rief er endlich aus; es fiel ihm nämlich ein Sprüchlein ein, das ihn sein Großvater, ein erfahrener, weitgereister Mann, gelehrt hatte und das gegen jeden Geister- und Zauberspuk helfen sollte; auch behauptete er, jenen unnatürlichen Schlaf, der uns befiel, in der nächsten Nacht verhindern zu können, wenn wir nämlich recht eifrig Sprüche aus dem Koran beteten. Der Vorschlag des alten Mannes gefiel mir wohl. In banger Erwartung sahen wir die Nacht herankommen. Neben der Kajüte war ein kleines Kämmerchen, dorthin beschlossen wir uns zurückzuziehen. Wir bohrten mehrere Löcher in die Türe, hinlänglich groß, um durch sie die ganze Kajüte zu überschauen, dann verschlossen wir die Türe, so gut es ging, von innen, und Ibrahim schrieb den Namen des Propheten in alle vier Ecken. So erwarteten wir die Schrecken der Nacht. Es mochte wieder ungefähr elf Uhr sein, als es mich gewaltig zu schläfern anfing. Mein Gefährte riet mir daher, einige Sprüche des Korans zu beten, was mir auch half. Mit einem Male schien es oben lebhaft zu werden; die Taue knarrten, Schritte gingen über das Verdeck, und mehrere Stimmen waren deutlich zu unterscheiden—Mehrere Minuten hatten wir so in gespannter Erwartung gesessen, da hörten wir etwas die Treppe der Kajüte herabkommen. Als dies der Alte hörte, fing er an, den Spruch, den ihn sein Großvater gegen Spuk und Zauberei gelehrt hatte, herzusagen:

„Kommt ihr herab aus der Luft,
Steigt ihr aus tiefem Meer,
Schlieft ihr in dunkler Gruft,
Stammt ihr vom Feuer her:
Allah ist euer Herr und Meister,
ihm sind gehorsam alle Geister.“

Ich muß gestehen, ich glaubte gar nicht recht an diesen Spruch, und mir stieg das Haar zu Berg, als die Tür aufflog. Herein trat jener große, stattliche Mann, den ich am Mastbaum angenagelt gesehen hatte. Der Nagel ging ihm auch jetzt mitten durchs Hirn; das Schwert aber hatte er in die Scheide gesteckt; hinter ihm trat noch ein anderer herein, weniger kostbar gekleidet; auch ihn hatte ich oben liegen sehen. Der Kapitano, denn dies war er unverkennbar, hatte ein bleiches Gesicht, einen großen, schwarzen Bart, wildrollende Augen, mit denen er sich im ganzen Gemach umsah. Ich konnte ihn ganz deutlich sehen, als er an unserer Türe vorüberging; er aber schien gar nicht auf die Türe zu achten, die uns verbarg. Beide setzten sich an den Tisch, der in der Mitte der Kajüte stand, und sprachen laut und fast schreiend miteinander in einer unbekannten Sprache. Sie wurden immer lauter und eifriger, bis endlich der Kapitano mit geballter Faust auf den Tisch hineinschlug, daß das Zimmer dröhnte. Mit wildem Gelächter sprang der andere auf und winkte dem Kapitano, ihm zu folgen. Dieser stand auf, riß seinen Säbel aus der Scheide, und beide verließen das Gemach. Wir atmeten freier, als sie weg waren; aber unsere Angst hatte noch lange kein Ende. Immer lauter und lauter ward es auf dem Verdeck. Man hörte eilends hin und her laufen und schreien, lachen und heulen. Endlich ging ein wahrhaft höllischer Lärm los, so daß wir glaubten, das Verdeck mit allen Segeln komme zu uns herab, Waffengeklirr und Geschrei—auf einmal aber tiefe Stille. Als wir es nach vielen Stunden wagten hinaufzugehen, trafen wir alles wie sonst; nicht einer lag anders als früher. Alle waren steif wie Holz.
So waren wir mehrere Tage auf dem Schiffe; es ging immer nach Osten, wohin zu, nach meiner Berechnung, Land liegen mußte; aber wenn es auch bei Tag viele Meilen zurückgelegt hatte, bei Nacht schien es immer wieder zurückzukehren, denn wir befanden uns immer wieder am nämlichen Fleck, wenn die Sonne aufging. Wir konnten uns dies nicht anders erklären, als daß die Toten jede Nacht mit vollem Winde zurücksegelten. Um nun dies zu verhüten, zogen wir, ehe es Nacht wurde, alle Segel ein und wandten dasselbe Mittel an wie bei der Türe in der Kajüte; wir schrieben den Namen des Propheten auf Pergament und auch das Sprüchlein des Großvaters dazu und banden es um die eingezogenen Segel. Ängstlich warteten wir in unserem Kämmerchen den Erfolg ab. Der Spuk schien diesmal noch ärger zu toben, aber siehe, am anderen Morgen waren die Segel noch aufgerollt, wie wir sie verlassen hatten. Wir spannten den Tag über nur so viele Segel auf, als nötig waren, das Schiff sanft fortzutreiben, und so legten wir in fünf Tagen eine gute Strecke zurück.
Endlich, am Morgen des sechsten Tages, entdeckten wir in geringer Ferne Land, und wir dankten Allah und seinem Propheten für unsere wunderbare Rettung. Diesen Tag und die folgende Nacht trieben wir an einer Küste hin, und am siebenten Morgen glaubten wir in geringer Entfernung eine Stadt zu entdecken; wir ließen mit vieler Mühe einen Anker in die See, der alsobald Grund faßte, setzten ein kleines Boot, das auf dem Verdeck stand, aus und ruderten mit aller Macht der Stadt zu. Nach einer halben Stunde liefen wir in einen Fluß ein, der sich in die See ergoß, und stiegen ans Ufer. Am Stadttor erkundigten wir uns, wie die Stadt heiße, und erfuhren, daß es eine indische Stadt sei, nicht weit von der Gegend, wohin ich zuerst zu schiffen willens war. Wir begaben uns in eine Karawanserei und erfrischten uns von unserer abenteuerlichen Reise. Ich forschte daselbst auch nach einem weisen und verständigen Manne, indem ich dem Wirt zu verstehen gab, daß ich einen solchen haben möchte, der sich ein wenig auf Zauberei verstehe. Er führte mich in eine abgelegene Straße, an ein unscheinbares Haus, pochte an, und man ließ mich eintreten mit der Weisung, ich solle nur nach Muley fragen.
In dem Hause kam mir ein altes Männlein mit grauem Bart und langer Nase entgegen und fragte nach meinem Begehr. Ich sagte ihm, ich suche den weisen Muley, und er antwortete mir, er sei es selbst. Ich fragte ihn nun um Rat, was ich mit den Toten machen solle und wie ich es angreifen müsse, um sie aus dem Schiff zu bringen. Er antwortete mir, die Leute des Schiffes seien wahrscheinlich wegen irgendeines Frevels auf das Meer verzaubert; er glaube, der Zauber werde sich lösen, wenn man sie ans Land bringe; dies könne aber nicht geschehen, als wenn man die Bretter, auf denen sie lägen, losmache. Mir gehöre von Gott und Rechts wegen das Schiff samt allen Gütern, weil ich es gleichsam gefunden habe; doch solle ich alles sehr geheimzuhalten trachten und ihm ein kleines Geschenk von meinem Überfluß machen; er wolle dafür mit seinen Sklaven mir behilflich sein, die Toten wegzuschaffen. Ich versprach, ihn reichlich zu belohnen, und wir machten uns mit fünf Sklaven, die mit Sägen und Beilen versehen waren, auf den Weg. Unterwegs konnte der Zauberer Muley unseren glücklichen Einfall, die Segel mit den Sprüchen des Korans zu umwinden, nicht genug loben. Er sagte, es sei dies das einzige Mittel gewesen, uns zu retten.
Es war noch ziemlich früh am Tage, als wir beim Schiff ankamen. Wir machten uns alle sogleich ans Werk, und in einer Stunde lagen schon vier in dem Nachen. Einige der Sklaven mußten sie an Land rudern, um sie dort zu verscharren. Sie erzählten, als sie zurückkamen, die Toten hätten ihnen die Mühe des Begrabens erspart, indem sie, sowie man sie auf die Erde gelegt habe, in Staub zerfallen seien. Wir fuhren fort, die Toten abzusägen, und bis vor Abend waren alle an Land gebracht. Es war endlich keiner mehr an Bord als der, welcher am Mast angenagelt war. Umsonst suchten wir den Nagel aus dem Holze zu ziehen, keine Gewalt vermochte ihn auch nur ein Haarbreit zu verrücken. Ich wußte nicht, was anzufangen war; man konnte doch nicht den Mastbaum abhauen, um ihn ans Land zu führen. Doch aus dieser Verlegenheit half Muley. Er ließ schnell einen Sklaven an Land rudern, um einen Topf mit Erde zu bringen. Als dieser herbeigeholt war, sprach der Zauberer geheimnisvolle Worte darüber aus und schüttete die Erde auf das Haupt des Toten. Sogleich schlug dieser die Augen auf, holte tief Atem, und die Wunde des Nagels in seiner Stirne fing an zu bluten. Wir zogen den Nagel jetzt leicht heraus, und der Verwundete fiel einem Sklaven in die Arme.
„Wer hat mich hierhergeführt?“ sprach er, nachdem er sich ein wenig erholt zu haben schien. Muley zeigte auf mich, und ich trat zu ihm. „Dank dir, unbekannter Fremdling, du hast mich von langen Qualen errettet. Seit fünfzig Jahren schifft mein Leib durch diese Wogen, und mein Geist war verdammt, jede Nacht in ihn zurückzukehren. Aber jetzt hat mein Haupt die Erde berührt, und ich kann versöhnt zu meinen Vätern gehen.“
Ich bat ihn, uns doch zu sagen, wie er zu diesem schrecklichen Zustand gekommen sei, und er sprach: „Vor fünfzig Jahren war ich ein mächtiger, angesehener Mann und wohnte in Algier; die Sucht nach Gewinn trieb mich, ein Schiff auszurüsten und Seeraub zu treiben. Ich hatte dieses Geschäft schon einige Zeit fortgeführt, da nahm ich einmal auf Zante einen Derwisch an Bord, der umsonst reisen wollte. Ich und meine Gesellen waren rohe Leute und achteten nicht auf die Heiligkeit des Mannes; vielmehr trieb ich mein Gespött mit ihm. Als er aber einst in heiligem Eifer mir meinen sündigen Lebenswandel verwiesen hatte, übermannte mich nachts in meiner Kajüte, als ich mit meinem Steuermann viel getrunken hatte, der Zorn. Wütend über das, was mir ein Derwisch gesagt hatte und was ich mir von keinem Sultan hätte sagen lassen, stürzte ich aufs Verdeck und stieß ihm meinen Dolch in die Brust. Sterbend verwünschte er mich und meine Mannschaft, nicht sterben und nicht leben zu können, bis wir unser Haupt auf die Erde legten. Der Derwisch starb, und wir warfen ihn in die See und verlachten seine Drohungen; aber noch in derselben Nacht erfüllten sich seine Worte. Ein Teil meiner Mannschaft empörte sich gegen mich—Mit fürchterlicher Wut wurde gestritten, bis meine Anhänger unterlagen und ich an den Mast genagelt wurde. Aber auch die Empörer erlagen ihren Wunden, und bald war mein Schiff nur ein großes Grab. Auch mir brachen die Augen, mein Atem hielt an, und ich meinte zu sterben. Aber es war nur eine Erstarrung, die mich gefesselt hielt; in der nächsten Nacht, zur nämlichen Stunde, da wir den Derwisch in die See geworfen, erwachten ich und alle meine Genossen, das Leben war zurückgekehrt, aber wir konnten nichts tun und sprechen, als was wir in jener Nacht gesprochen und getan hatten. So segeln wir seit fünfzig Jahren, können nicht leben, nicht sterben; denn wie konnten wir das Land erreichen? Mit toller Freude segelten wir allemal mit vollen Segeln in den Sturm, weil wir hofften, endlich an einer Klippe zu zerschellen und das müde Haupt auf dem Grund des Meeres zur Ruhe zu legen. Es ist uns nicht gelungen. Jetzt aber werde ich sterben. Noch einmal meinen Dank, unbekannter Retter, wenn Schätze dich lohnen können, so nimm mein Schiff als Zeichen meiner Dankbarkeit.“
Der Kapitano ließ sein Haupt sinken, als er so gesprochen hatte, und verschied. Sogleich zerfiel er auch, wie seine Gefährten, in Staub. Wir sammelten diesen in ein Kästchen und begruben ihn an Land; aus der Stadt nahm ich aber Arbeiter, die mir mein Schiff in guten Zustand setzten. Nachdem ich die Waren, die ich an Bord hatte, gegen andere mit großem Gewinn eingetauscht hatte, mietete ich Matrosen, beschenkte meinen Freund Muley reichlich und schiffte mich nach meinem Vaterlande ein. Ich machte aber einen Umweg, indem ich an vielen Inseln und Ländern landete und meine Waren zu Markt brachte. Der Prophet segnete mein Unternehmen. Nach dreiviertel Jahren lief ich, noch einmal so reich, als mich der sterbende Kapitän gemacht hatte, in Balsora ein. Meine Mitbürger waren erstaunt über meine Reichtümer und mein Glück und glaubten nicht anders, als daß ich das Diamantental des berühmten Reisenden Sindbad gefunden habe. Ich ließ sie in ihrem Glauben, von nun an aber mußten die jungen Leute von Balsora, wenn sie kaum achtzehn Jahre alt waren, in die Welt hinaus, um gleich mir ihr Glück zu machen. Ich aber lebte ruhig und in Frieden, und alle fünf Jahre mache ich eine Reise nach Mekka, um dem Herrn an heiliger Stätte für seinen Segen zu danken und für den Kapitano und seine Leute zu bitten, daß er sie in sein Paradies aufnehme.

Die Reise der Karawane war den anderen Tag ohne Hindernis fürder gegangen, und als man im Lagerplatz sich erholt hatte, begann Selim, der Fremde, zu Muley, dem jüngsten der Kaufleute, also zu sprechen:
„Ihr seid zwar der Jüngste von uns, doch seid Ihr immer fröhlich und wißt für uns gewiß irgendeinen guten Schwank. Tischet ihn auf, daß er uns erquicke nach der Hitze des Tages!“
„Wohl möchte ich euch etwas erzählen“, antwortete Muley, „das euch Spaß machen könnte, doch der Jugend ziemt Bescheidenheit in allen Dingen; darum müssen meine älteren Reisegefährten den Vorrang haben. Zaleukos ist immer so ernst und verschlossen, sollte er uns nicht erzählen, was sein Leben so ernst machte? Vielleicht, daß wir seinen Kummer, wenn er solchen hat, lindern können; denn gerne dienen wir dem Bruder, wenn er auch anderen Glaubens ist.“
Der Aufgerufene war ein griechischer Kaufmann, ein Mann in mittleren Jahren, schön und kräftig, aber sehr ernst. Ob er gleich ein Ungläubiger (nicht Muselmann) war, so liebten ihn doch seine Reisegefährten, denn er hatte durch sein ganzes Wesen Achtung und Zutrauen eingeflößt. Er hatte übrigens nur eine Hand, und einige seiner Gefährten vermuteten, daß vielleicht dieser Verlust ihn so ernst stimme.
Zaleukos antwortete auf die zutrauliche Frage Muleys: „Ich bin sehr geehrt durch euer Zutrauen; Kummer habe ich keinen, wenigstens keinen, von welchem ihr auch mit dem besten Willen mir helfen könntet. Doch weil Muley mir meinen Ernst vorzuwerfen scheint, so will ich euch einiges erzählen, was mich rechtfertigen soll, wenn ich ernster bin als andere Leute. Ihr sehet, daß ich meine linke Hand verloren habe. Sie fehlt mir nicht von Geburt an, sondern ich habe sie in den schrecklichsten Tagen meines Lebens eingebüßt. Ob ich die Schuld davon trage, ob ich unrecht habe, seit jenen Tagen ernster, als es meine Lage mit sich bringt, zu sein, möget ihr beurteilen, wenn ihr vernommen habt die Geschichte von der abgehauenen Hand.“


DIE GESCHICHTE VON DER ABGEHAUENEN HAND

Ich bin in Konstantinopel geboren; mein Vater war ein Dragoman (Dolmetscher) bei der Pforte (dem türkischen Hof) und trieb nebenbei einen ziemlich einträglichen Handel mit wohlriechenden Essenzen und seidenen Stoffen. Er gab mir eine gute Erziehung, indem er mich teils selbst unterrichtete, teils von einem unserer Priester mir Unterricht geben ließ. Er bestimmte mich anfangs, seinen Laden einmal zu übernehmen, als ich aber größere Fähigkeiten zeigte, als er erwartet hatte, bestimmte er mich auf das Anraten seiner Freunde zum Arzt; weil ein Arzt, wenn er etwas mehr gelernt hat als die gewöhnlichen Marktschreier, in Konstantinopel sein Glück machen kann. Es kamen viele Franken in unser Haus, und einer davon überredete meinen Vater, mich in sein Vaterland, nach der Stadt Paris, reisen zu lassen, wo man solche Sachen unentgeltlich und am besten lernen könne. Er selbst aber wolle mich, wenn er zurückreise, umsonst mitnehmen. Mein Vater, der in seiner Jugend auch gereist war, schlug ein, und der Franke sagte mir, ich könne mich in drei Monaten bereithalten. Ich war außer mir vor Freude, fremde Länder zu sehen.
Der Franke hatte endlich seine Geschäfte abgemacht und sich zur Reise bereitet; am Vorabend der Reise führte mich mein Vater in sein Schlafkämmerlein. Dort sah ich schöne Kleider und Waffen auf dem Tische liegen. Was meine Blicke aber noch mehr anzog, war ein großer Haufe Goldes, denn ich hatte noch nie so viel beieinander gesehen. Mein Vater umarmte mich und sagte: „Siehe, mein Sohn, ich habe dir Kleider zu der Reise besorgt. Jene Waffen sind dein, es sind die nämlichen, die mir dein Großvater umhing, als ich in die Fremde auszog. Ich weiß, du kannst sie führen; gebrauche sie aber nie, als wenn du angegriffen wirst; dann aber schlage auch tüchtig drauf. Mein Vermögen ist nicht groß; siehe, ich habe es in drei Teile geteilt, einer davon ist dein; einer davon ist mein Unterhalt und Notpfennig, der dritte aber sei mir ein heiliges, unantastbares Gut, er diene dir in der Stunde der Not!“ So sprach mein alter Vater, und Tränen hingen ihm im Auge, vielleicht aus Ahnung, denn ich habe ihn nie wieder gesehen.
Die Reise ging gut von Statten; wir waren bald im Lande der Franken angelangt, und sechs Tagreisen nachher kamen wir in die große Stadt Paris. Hier mietete mir mein fränkischer Freund ein Zimmer und riet mir, mein Geld, das in allem zweitausend Taler betrug, vorsichtig anzuwenden. Ich lebte drei Jahre in dieser Stadt und lernte, was ein tüchtiger Arzt wissen muß; ich müßte aber lügen, wenn ich sagte, daß ich gerne dort gewesen sei; denn die Sitten dieses Volkes gefielen mir nicht; auch hatte ich nur wenige gute Freunde dort, diese aber waren edle, junge Männer.
Die Sehnsucht nach der Heimat wurde endlich mächtig in mir; in der ganzen Zeit hatte ich nichts von meinem Vater gehört, und ich ergriff daher eine günstige Gelegenheit, nach Hause zu kommen.
Es ging nämlich eine Gesandtschaft aus Frankenland nach der Hohen Pforte. Ich verdingte mich als Wundarzt in das Gefolge des Gesandten und kam glücklich wieder nach Stambul. Das Haus meines Vaters aber fand ich verschlossen, und die Nachbarn staunten, als sie mich sahen, und sagten mir, mein Vater sei vor zwei Monaten gestorben. Jener Priester, der mich in meiner Jugend unterrichtet hatte, brachte nur den Schlüssel; allein und verlassen zog ich in das verödete Haus ein. Ich fand noch alles, wie es mein Vater verlassen hatte; nur das Gold, das er mir zu hinterlassen versprach, fehlte. Ich fragte den Priester darüber, und dieser verneigte sich und sprach: „Euer Vater ist als ein heiliger Mann gestorben; denn er hat sein Gold der Kirche vermacht.“ Dies war und blieb mir unbegreiflich; doch was wollte ich machen; ich hatte keine Zeugen gegen den Priester und mußte froh sein, daß er nicht auch das Haus und die Waren meines Vaters als Vermächtnis angesehen hatte.
Dies war das erste Unglück, das mich traf. Von jetzt an aber kam es Schlag auf Schlag. Mein Ruf als Arzt wollte sich gar nicht ausbreiten, weil ich mich schämte, den Marktschreier zu machen, und überall fehlte mir die Empfehlung meines Vaters, der mich bei den Reichsten und Vornehmsten eingeführt hätte, die jetzt nicht mehr an den armen Zaleukos dachten. Auch die Waren meines Vaters fanden keinen Abgang; denn die Kunden hatten sich nach seinem Tode verlaufen, und neue bekommt man nur langsam. Als ich einst trostlos über meine Lage nachdachte, fiel mir ein, daß ich oft in Franken Männer meines Volkes gesehen hatte, die das Land durchzogen und ihre Waren auf den Märkten der Städte auslegten; ich erinnerte mich, daß man ihnen gerne abkaufte, weil sie aus der Fremde kamen, und daß man bei solchem Handel das Hundertfache erwerben könne. Sogleich war auch mein Entschluß gefaßt. Ich verkaufte mein väterliches Haus, gab einen Teil des gelösten Geldes einem bewährten Freunde zum Aufbewahren, von dem übrigen aber kaufte ich, was man in Franken selten hat, wie Schals, seidene Zeuge, Salben und Öle, mietete einen Platz auf einem Schiff und trat so meine zweite Reise nach Franken an.
Es schien, als ob das Glück, sobald ich die Schlösser der Dardanellen im Rücken hatte, mir wieder günstig geworden wäre. Unsere Fahrt war kurz und glücklich. Ich durchzog die großen und kleinen Städte der Franken und fand überall willige Käufer meiner Waren. Mein Freund in Stambul sandte mir immer wieder frische Vorräte, und ich wurde von Tag zu Tag wohlhabender. Als ich endlich so viel erspart hatte, daß ich glaubte, ein größeres Unternehmen wagen zu können, zog ich mit meinen Waren nach Italien. Etwas muß ich aber noch gestehen, was mir auch nicht wenig Geld einbrachte: ich nahm auch meine Arzneikunst zu Hilfe. Wenn ich in eine Stadt kam, ließ ich durch Zettel verkünden, daß ein griechischer Arzt da sei, der schon viele geheilt habe; und wahrlich, mein Balsam und meine Arzneien haben mir manche Zechine eingebracht.
So war ich endlich nach der Stadt Florenz in Italien gekommen. Ich nahm mir vor, längere Zeit in dieser Stadt zu bleiben, teils weil sie mir so wohl gefiel, teils auch, weil ich mich von den Strapazen meines Umherziehens erholen wollte. Ich mietete mir ein Gewölbe in dem Stadtviertel St. Croce und nicht weit davon ein paar schöne Zimmer, die auf einen Altan führten, in einem Wirtshaus. Sogleich ließ ich auch meine Zettel umhertragen, die mich als Arzt und Kaufmann ankündigten. Ich hatte kaum mein Gewölbe eröffnet, so strömten auch die Käufer herzu, und ob ich gleich ein wenig hohe Preise hatte, so verkaufte ich doch mehr als andere, weil ich gefällig und freundlich gegen meine Kunden war. Ich hatte schon vier Tage vergnügt in Florenz verlebt, als ich eines Abends, da ich schon mein Gewölbe schließen und nur die Vorräte in meinen Salbenbüchsen nach meiner Gewohnheit noch einmal mustern wollte, in einer kleinen Büchse einen Zettel fand, den ich mich nicht erinnerte, hineingetan zu haben. Ich öffnete den Zettel und fand darin eine Einladung, diese Nacht Punkt zwölf Uhr auf der Brücke, die man Ponte vecchio heißt, mich einzufinden. Ich sann lange darüber nach, wer es wohl sein könnte, der mich dorthin einlud, da ich aber keine Seele in Florenz kannte, dachte ich, man werde mich vielleicht heimlich zu irgendeinem Kranken führen wollen, was schon öfter geschehen war. Ich beschloß also hinzugehen, doch hing ich zur Vorsicht den Säbel um, den mir einst mein Vater geschenkt hatte.
Als es stark gegen Mitternacht ging, machte ich mich auf den Weg und kam bald auf die Ponte vecchio. Ich fand die Brücke verlassen und öde und beschloß zu warten, bis er erscheinen würde, der mich rief. Es war eine kalte Nacht; der Mond schien hell, und ich schaute hinab in die Wellen des Arno, die weithin im Mondlicht schimmerten. Auf den Kirchen der Stadt schlug es jetzt zwölf Uhr; ich richtete mich auf, und vor mir stand ein großer Mann, ganz in einen roten Mantel gehüllt, dessen einen Zipfel er vor das Gesicht hielt.
Ich war von Anfang etwas erschrocken, weil er so plötzlich hinter mir stand, faßte mich aber sogleich wieder und sprach: „Wenn Ihr mich habt hierher bestellt, so sagt an, was steht zu Eurem Befehl?“
Der Rotmantel wandte sich um und sagte langsam: „Folge!“ Da ward mir’s doch etwas unheimlich zumute, mit diesem Unbekannten allein zu gehen; ich blieb stehen und sprach: „Nicht also, lieber Herr, wollet mir vorerst sagen, wohin; auch könnet Ihr mir Euer Gesicht ein wenig zeigen, daß ich sehe, ob Ihr Gutes mit mir vorhabt.“
Der Rote aber schien sich nicht darum zu kümmern. „Wenn du nicht willst, Zaleukos, so bleibe!“ antwortete er und ging weiter.
Da entbrannte mein Zorn. „Meinet Ihr“, rief ich aus, „ein Mann wie ich lasse sich von jedem Narren foppen, und ich werde in dieser kalten Nacht umsonst gewartet haben?“ In drei Sprüngen hatte ich ihn erreicht, packte ihn an seinem Mantel und schrie noch lauter, indem ich die andere Hand an den Säbel legte; aber der Mantel blieb mir in der Hand, und der Unbekannte war um die nächste Ecke verschwunden. Mein Zorn legte sich nach und nach; ich hatte doch den Mantel, und dieser sollte mir schon den Schlüssel zu diesem wunderlichen Abenteuer geben.
Ich hing ihn um und ging meinen Weg weiter nach Hause. Als ich kaum noch hundert Schritte davon entfernt war, streifte jemand dicht an mir vorüber und flüsterte in fränkischer Sprache: „Nehmt Euch in acht, Graf, heute nacht ist nichts zu machen.“ Ehe ich mich aber umsehen konnte, war dieser Jemand schon vorbei, und ich sah nur noch einen Schatten an den Häusern hinschweben. Daß dieser Zuruf den Mantel und nicht mich anging, sah ich ein; doch gab er mir kein Licht über die Sache. Am anderen Morgen überlegte ich, was zu tun sei. Ich war von Anfang gesonnen, den Mantel ausrufen zu lassen, als hätte ich ihn gefunden; doch da konnte der Unbekannte ihn durch einen Dritten holen lassen, und ich hätte dann keinen Aufschluß über die Sache gehabt. Ich besah, indem ich so nachdachte, den Mantel näher. Er war von schwerem genuesischem Samt, purpurrot, mit astrachanischem Pelz verbrämt und reich mit Gold bestickt. Der prachtvolle Anblick des Mantels brachte mich auf einen Gedanken, den ich auszuführen beschloß.
Ich trug ihn in mein Gewölbe und legte ihn zum Verkauf aus, setzte aber auf ihn einen so hohen Preis, daß ich gewiß war, keinen Käufer zu finden. Mein Zweck dabei war, jeden, der nach dem Pelz fragen würde, scharf ins Auge zu fassen; denn die Gestalt des Unbekannten, die sich mir nach Verlust des Mantels, wenn auch nur flüchtig, doch bestimmt zeigte, wollte ich aus Tausenden erkennen. Es fanden sich viele Kauflustige zu dem Mantel, dessen außerordentliche Schönheit alle Augen auf sich zog; aber keiner glich entfernt dem Unbekannten, keiner wollte den hohen Preis von zweihundert Zechinen dafür bezahlen. Auffallend war mir dabei, daß, wenn ich einen oder den anderen fragte, ob denn sonst kein solcher Mantel in Florenz sei, alle mit „Nein!“ antworteten und versicherten, eine so kostbare und geschmackvolle Arbeit nie gesehen zu haben.
Es wollte schon Abend werden, da kam endlich ein junger Mann, der schon oft bei mir gewesen war und auch heute viel auf den Mantel geboten hatte, warf einen Beutel mit Zechinen auf den Tisch und rief: „Bei Gott! Zaleukos, ich muß deinen Mantel haben, und sollte ich zum Bettler darüber werden.“ Zugleich begann er, seine Goldstücke aufzuzählen. Ich kam in große Not; ich hatte den Mantel nur ausgehängt, um vielleicht die Blicke meines Unbekannten darauf zu ziehen, und jetzt kam ein junger Tor, um den ungeheuren Preis zu zahlen. Doch was blieb mir übrig; ich gab nach, denn es tat mir auf der anderen Seite der Gedanke wohl, für mein nächtliches Abenteuer so schön entschädigt zu werden. Der Jüngling hing sich den Mantel um und ging; er kehrte aber auf der Schwelle wieder um, indem er ein Papier, das am Mantel befestigt war, losmachte, mir zuwarf und sagte: „Hier, Zaleukos, hängt etwas, das wohl nicht zu dem Mantel gehört.“
Gleichgültig nahm ich den Zettel; aber siehe da, dort stand geschrieben: „Bringe heute nacht um die bewußte Stunde den Mantel auf die Ponte vecchio, vierhundert Zechinen warten deiner.“
Ich stand wie niedergedonnert. So hatte ich also mein Glück selbst verscherzt und meinen Zweck gänzlich verfehlt! Doch ich besann mich nicht lange, raffte die zweihundert Zechinen zusammen, sprang dem, der den Mantel gekauft hatte, nach und sprach: „Nehmt Eure Zechinen wieder, guter Freund, und laßt mir den Mantel, ich kann ihn unmöglich hergeben.“ Dieser hielt die Sache von Anfang für Spaß, als er aber merkte, daß es Ernst war, geriet er in Zorn über meine Forderung, schalt mich einen Narren, und so kam es endlich zu Schlägen. Doch ich war so glücklich, im Handgemenge ihm den Mantel zu entreißen, und wollte schon mit ihm davoneilen, als der junge Mann die Polizei zu Hilfe rief und mich mit sich vor Gericht zog. Der Richter war sehr erstaunt über die Anklage und sprach meinem Gegner den Mantel zu. Ich aber bot dem Jünglinge zwanzig, fünfzig, achtzig, ja hundert Zechinen über seine zweihundert, wenn er mir den Mantel ließe. Was meine Bitten nicht vermochten, bewirkte mein Gold. Er nahm meine guten Zechinen, ich aber zog mit dem Mantel triumphierend ab und mußte mir gefallen lassen, daß man mich in ganz Florenz für einen Wahnsinnigen hielt. Doch die Meinung der Leute war mir gleichgültig; ich wußte es ja besser als sie, daß ich an dem Handel noch gewann.
Mit Ungeduld erwartete ich die Nacht. Um dieselbe Zeit wie gestern ging ich, den Mantel unter dem Arm, auf die Ponte vecchio. Mit dem letzten Glockenschlag kam die Gestalt aus der Nacht heraus auf mich zu. Es war unverkennbar der Mann von gestern. „Hast du den Mantel?“ wurde ich gefragt.
„Ja, Herr“, antwortete ich, „aber er kostete mich bar hundert Zechinen.“
„Ich weiß es“, entgegnete jener. „Schau auf, hier sind vierhundert.“ Er trat mit mir an das breite Geländer der Brücke und zählte die Goldstücke hin. Vierhundert waren es; prächtig blitzten sie im Mondschein, ihr Glanz erfreute mein Herz, ach! Es ahnete nicht, daß es seine letzte Freude sein werde. Ich steckte mein Geld in die Tasche und wollte mir nun auch den gütigen Unbekannten recht betrachten; aber er hatte eine Larve vor dem Gesicht, aus der mich dunkle Augen furchtbar anblitzten.
„Ich danke Euch, Herr, für Eure Güte“, sprach ich zu ihm, „was verlangt Ihr jetzt von mir? Das sage ich Euch aber vorher, daß es nichts Unrechtes sein darf.“
„Unnötige Sorge“, antwortete er, indem er den Mantel um die Schultern legte, „ich bedarf Eurer Hilfe als Arzt; doch nicht für einen Lebenden, sondern für einen Toten.“
„Wie kann das sein?“ rief ich voll Verwunderung.
„Ich kam mit meiner Schwester aus fernen Landen“, erzählte er und winkte mir zugleich, ihm zu folgen. „Ich wohnte hier mit ihr bei einem Freund meines Hauses. Meine Schwester starb gestern schnell an einer Krankheit, und die Verwandten wollen sie morgen begraben. Nach einer alten Sitte unserer Familie aber sollen alle in der Gruft der Väter ruhen; viele, die in fremden Landen starben, ruhen dennoch dort einbalsamiert. Meinen Verwandten gönne ich nun ihren Körper; meinem Vater aber muß ich wenigstens den Kopf seiner Tochter bringen, damit er sie noch einmal sehe.“ Diese Sitte, die Köpfe geliebter Anverwandten abzuschneiden, kam mir zwar etwas schrecklich vor; doch wagte ich nichts dagegen einzuwenden aus Furcht, den Unbekannten zu beleidigen. Ich sagte ihm daher, daß ich mit dem Einbalsamieren der Toten wohl umgehen könne, und bat ihn, mich zu der Verstorbenen zu führen. Doch konnte ich mich nicht enthalten zu fragen, warum denn dies alles so geheimnisvoll und in der Nacht geschehen müsse. Er antwortete mir, daß seine Anverwandten, die seine Absicht für grausam hielten, bei Tage ihn abhalten würden; sei aber nur erst einmal der Kopf abgenommen, so könnten sie wenig mehr darüber sagen. Er hätte mir zwar den Kopf bringen können; aber ein natürliches Gefühl halte ihn ab, ihn selbst abzunehmen.
Wir waren indes bis an ein großes, prachtvolles Haus gekommen. Mein Begleiter zeigte es mir als das Ziel unseres nächtlichen Spazierganges. Wir gingen an dem Haupttor des Hauses vorbei, traten in eine kleine Pforte, die der Unbekannte sorgfältig hinter sich zumachte, und stiegen nun im Finstern eine enge Wendeltreppe hinan. Sie führte in einen spärlich erleuchteten Gang, aus welchem wir in ein Zimmer gelangten, das eine Lampe, die an der Decke befestigt war, erleuchtete.
In diesem Gemach stand ein Bett, in welchem der Leichnam lag. Der Unbekannte wandte sein Gesicht ab und schien Tränen verbergen zu wollen. Er deutete nach dem Bett, befahl mir, mein Geschäft gut und schnell zu verrichten, und ging wieder zur Türe hinaus.
Ich packte meine Messer, die ich als Arzt immer bei mir führte, aus und näherte mich dem Bett. Nur der Kopf war von der Leiche sichtbar; aber dieser war so schön, daß mich unwillkürlich das innigste Mitleiden ergriff. In langen Flechten hing das dunkle Haar herab, das Gesicht war bleich, die Augen geschlossen. Ich machte zuerst einen Einschnitt in die Haut, nach der Weise der Ärzte, wenn sie ein Glied abschneiden. Sodann nahm ich mein schärfstes Messer und schnitt mit einem Zug die Kehle durch. Aber welcher Schrecken! Die Tote schlug die Augen auf, schloß sie aber gleich wieder, und in einem tiefen Seufzer schien sie jetzt erst ihr Leben auszuhauchen. Zugleich schoß mir ein Strahl heißen Blutes aus der Wunde entgegen. Ich überzeugte mich, daß ich erst die Arme getötet hatte; denn daß sie tot sei, war kein Zweifel, da es von dieser Wunde keine Rettung gab. Ich stand einige Minuten in banger Beklommenheit über das, was geschehen war. Hatte der Rotmantel mich betrogen, oder war die Schwester vielleicht nur scheintot gewesen? Das letztere schien mir wahrscheinlicher. Aber ich durfte dem Bruder der Verstorbenen nicht sagen, daß vielleicht ein weniger rascher Schnitt sie erweckt hätte, ohne sie zu töten, darum wollte ich den Kopf vollends ablösen; aber noch einmal stöhnte die Sterbende, streckt sich in schmerzhafter Bewegung aus und starb. Da übermannte mich der Schrecken, und ich stürzte schaudernd aus dem Gemach. Aber draußen im Gang war es finster; denn die Lampe war verlöscht. Keine Spur von meinem Begleiter war zu entdecken, und ich mußte aufs ungefähr mich im Finstern an der Wand fortbewegen, um an die Wendeltreppe zu gelangen. Ich fand sie endlich und kam halb fallend, halb gleitend hinab. Auch unten war kein Mensch. Die Türe fand ich nur angelehnt, und ich atmete freier, als ich auf der Straße war; denn in dem Hause war mir ganz unheimlich geworden. Von Schrecken gespornt, rannte ich in meine Wohnung und begrub mich in die Polster meines Lagers, um das Schreckliche zu vergessen, das ich getan hatte. Aber der Schlaf floh mich, und erst der Morgen ermahnte mich wieder, mich zu fassen. Es war mir wahrscheinlich, daß der Mann, der mich zu dieser verruchten Tat, wie sie mir jetzt erschien, verführt hatte, mich nicht angeben würde. Ich entschloß mich, gleich in mein Gewölbe an mein Geschäft zu gehen und womöglich eine sorglose Miene anzunehmen. Aber ach! Ein neuer Umstand, den ich jetzt erst bemerkte, vermehrte noch meinen Kummer. Meine Mütze und mein Gürtel wie auch meine Messer fehlten mir, und ich war ungewiß, ob ich sie in dem Zimmer der Getöteten gelassen oder erst auf meiner Flucht verloren hatte. Leider schien das erste wahrscheinlicher, und man konnte mich also als Mörder entdecken.
Ich öffnete zur gewöhnlichen Zeit mein Gewölbe. Mein Nachbar trat zu mir her, wie er alle Morgen zu tun pflegte, denn er war ein gesprächiger Mann. „Ei, was sagt Ihr zu der schrecklichen Geschichte“, hub er an, „die heute nacht vorgefallen ist?“ Ich tat, als ob ich nichts wüßte. „Wie, solltet Ihr nicht wissen, von was die ganze Stadt erfüllt ist? Nicht wissen, daß die schönste Blume von Florenz, Bianka, die Tochter des Gouverneurs, in dieser Nacht ermordet wurde? Ach! Ich sah sie gestern noch so heiter durch die Straßen fahren mit ihrem Bräutigam, denn heute hätten sie Hochzeit gehabt.“
Jedes Wort des Nachbarn war mir ein Stich ins Herz. Und wie oft kehrte meine Marter wieder; denn jeder meiner Kunden erzählte mir die Geschichte, immer einer schrecklicher als der andere, und doch konnte keiner so Schreckliches sagen, als ich selbst gesehen hatte. Um Mittag ungefähr trat ein Mann vom Gericht in mein Gewölbe und bat mich, die Leute zu entfernen. „Signore Zaleukos“, sprach er, indem er die Sachen, die ich vermißte, hervorzog, „gehören diese Sachen Euch zu?“ Ich besann mich, ob ich sie nicht gänzlich ableugnen sollte; aber als ich durch die halbgeöffnete Tür meinen Wirt und mehrere Bekannte, die wohl gegen mich zeugen konnten, erblickte, beschloß ich, die Sache nicht noch durch eine Lüge zu verschlimmern, und bekannte mich zu den vorgezeigten Dingen. Der Gerichtsmann bat mich, ihm zu folgen, und führte mich in ein großes Gebäude, das ich bald für das Gefängnis erkannte. Dort wies er mir bis auf weiteres ein Gemach an.
Meine Lage war schrecklich, als ich so in der Einsamkeit darüber nachdachte. Der Gedanke, gemordet zu haben, wenn auch ohne Willen, kehrte immer wieder. Auch konnte ich mir nicht verhehlen, daß der Glanz des Goldes meine Sinne befangen gehalten hatte; sonst hätte ich nicht so blindlings in die Falle gehen können. Zwei Stunden nach meiner Verhaftung wurde ich aus meinem Gemach geführt. Mehrere Treppen ging es hinab, dann kam man in einen großen Saal. Um einen langen, schwarzbehängten Tisch saßen dort zwölf Männer, meistens Greise. An den Seiten des Saales zogen sich Bänke herab, angefüllt mit den Vornehmsten von Florenz; auf den Galerien, die in der Höhe angebracht waren, standen dicht gedrängt die Zuschauer. Als ich bis vor den schwarzen Tisch getreten war, erhob sich ein Mann mit finsterer, trauriger Miene; es war der Gouverneur. Er sprach zu den Versammelten, daß er als Vater in dieser Sache nicht richten könne und daß er seine Stelle für diesmal an den ältesten der Senatoren abtrete. Der älteste der Senatoren war ein Greis von wenigstens neunzig Jahren. Er stand gebückt, und seine Schläfen waren mit dünnem, weißem Haar umhängt; aber feurig brannten noch seine Augen, und seine Stimme war stark und sicher. Er hub an, mich zu fragen, ob ich den Mord gestehe. Ich bat ihn um Gehör und erzählte unerschrocken und mit vernehmlichen Stimme, was ich getan hatte und was ich wußte. Ich bemerkte, daß der Gouverneur während meiner Erzählung bald blaß, bald rot wurde, und als ich geschlossen, fuhr er wütend auf: „Wie, Elender!“ rief er mir zu, „so willst du ein Verbrechen, das du aus Habgier begangen, noch einem anderen aufbürden?“
Der Senator verwies ihm seine Unterbrechung, da er sich freiwillig seines Rechtes begeben habe; auch sei es gar nicht so erwiesen, daß ich aus Habgier gefrevelt; denn nach seiner eigenen Aussage sei ja der Getöteten nichts gestohlen worden. Ja, er ging noch weiter; er erklärte dem Gouverneur, daß er über das frühere Leben seiner Tochter Rechenschaft geben müsse; denn nur so könne man schließen, ob ich die Wahrheit gesagt habe oder nicht. Zugleich hob er für heute das Gericht auf, um sich, wie er sagte, aus den Papieren der Verstorbenen, die ihm der Gouverneur übergeben werde, Rat zu holen. Ich wurde wieder in mein Gefängnis zurückgeführt, wo ich einen schaurigen Tag verlebte, immer mit dem heißen Wunsch beschäftigt, daß man doch irgendeine Verbindung zwischen der Toten und dem Rotmantel entdecken möchte. Voll Hoffnung trat ich den anderen Tag in den Gerichtssaal. Es lagen mehrere Briefe auf dem Tisch. Der alte Senator fragte mich, ob sie meine Handschrift seien. Ich sah sie an und fand, daß sie von derselben Hand sein müßten wie jene beiden Zettel, die ich erhalten. Ich äußerte dies den Senatoren; aber man schien nicht darauf zu achten und antwortete, daß ich beides geschrieben haben könne und müsse; denn der Namenszug unter den Briefen sei unverkennbar ein Z, der Anfangsbuchstabe meines Namens. Die Briefe aber enthielten Drohungen an die Verstorbene und Warnungen vor der Hochzeit, die sie zu vollziehen im Begriff war.
Der Gouverneur schien sonderbare Aufschlüsse in Hinsicht auf meine Person gegeben zu haben; denn man behandelte mich an diesem Tage mißtrauischer und strenger. Ich berief mich zu meiner Rechtfertigung auf meine Papiere, die sich in meinem Zimmer finden müßten; aber man sagte mir, man habe nachgesucht und nichts gefunden. So schwand mir am Schlusse dieses Gerichts alle Hoffnung, und als ich am dritten Tag wieder in den Saal geführt wurde, las man mir das Urteil vor, daß ich, eines vorsätzlichen Mordes überwiesen, zum Tode verurteilt sei. Dahin also war es mit mir gekommen. Verlassen von allem, was mir auf Erden noch teuer war, fern von meiner Heimat, sollte ich unschuldig in der Blüte meiner Jahre vom Beile sterben.
Ich saß am Abend dieses schrecklichen Tages, der über mein Schicksal entschieden hatte, in meinem einsamen Kerker; meine Hoffnungen waren dahin, meine Gedanken ernsthaft auf den Tod gerichtet. Da tat sich die Türe meines Gefängnisses auf, und ein Mann trat herein, der mich lange schweigend betrachtete. „So finde ich dich wieder, Zaleukos?“ sagte er; ich hatte ihn bei dem matten Schein meiner Lampe nicht erkannt, aber der Klang seiner Stimme erweckte alte Erinnerungen in mir, es war Valetty, einer jener wenigen Freunde, die ich in der Stadt Paris während meiner Studien kannte. Er sagte, daß er zufällig nach Florenz gekommen sei, wo sein Vater als angesehener Mann wohne, er habe von meiner Geschichte gehört und sei gekommen, um mich noch einmal zu sehen und von mir selbst zu erfahren, wie ich mich so schwer habe verschulden können. Ich erzählte ihm die ganze Geschichte. Er schien darüber sehr verwundert und beschwor mich, ihm, meinem einzigen Freunde, alles zu sagen, um nicht mit einer Lüge von hinnen zu gehen. Ich schwor ihm mit dem teuersten Eid, daß ich wahr gesprochen und daß keine andere Schuld mich drücke, als daß ich, von dem Glanze des Goldes geblendet, das Unwahrscheinliche der Erzählung des Unbekannten nicht erkannt habe. „So hast du Bianka nicht gekannt?“ fragte jener. Ich beteuerte ihm, sie nie gesehen zu haben. Valetty erzählte mir nun, daß ein tiefes Geheimnis auf der Tat liege, daß der Gouverneur meine Verurteilung sehr hastig betrieben habe, und es sei nun ein Gerücht unter die Leute gekommen, daß ich Bianka schon längst gekannt und aus Rache über ihre Heirat mit einem anderen sie ermordet habe. Ich bemerkte ihm, daß dies alles ganz auf den Rotmantel passe, daß ich aber seine Teilnahme an der Tat mit nichts beweisen könne. Valetty umarmte mich weinend und versprach mir, alles zu tun, um wenigstens mein Leben zu retten. Ich hatte wenig Hoffnung; doch wußte ich, daß Valetty ein weiser und der Gesetze kundiger Mann sei und daß er alles tun werde, mich zu retten. Zwei lange Tage war ich in Ungewißheit: Endlich erschien auch Valetty. „Ich bringe Trost, wenn auch einen schmerzlichen. Du wirst leben und frei sein; aber mit Verlust einer Hand.“ Gerührt dankte ich meinem Freunde für mein Leben. Er sagte mir, daß der Gouverneur unerbittlich gewesen sei, die Sache noch einmal untersuchen zu lassen; daß er aber endlich, um nicht ungerecht zu erscheinen, bewilligt habe, wenn man in den Büchern der florentinischen Geschichte einen ähnlichen Fall finde, so solle meine Strafe sich nach der Strafe, die dort ausgesprochen sei, richten. Er und sein Vater haben nun Tag und Nacht in den alten Büchern gelesen und endlich einen ganz dem meinigen ähnlichen Fall gefunden. Dort laute die Strafe: Es soll ihm die linke Hand abgehauen, seine Güter eingezogen, er selbst auf ewig verbannt werden. So laute jetzt auch meine Strafe, und ich solle mich jetzt bereiten zu der schmerzhaften Stunde, die meiner warte. Ich will euch nicht diese schreckliche Stunde vor das Auge führen, wo ich auf offenem Markt meine Hand auf den Block legte, wo mein eigenes Blut in weitem Bogen mich überströmte!
Valetty nahm mich in sein Haus auf, bis ich genesen war, dann versah er mich edelmütig mit Reisegeld; denn alles, was ich mir so mühsam erworben, war eine Beute des Gerichts geworden. Ich reiste von Florenz nach Sizilien und von da mit dem ersten Schiff, das ich fand, nach Konstantinopel. Meine Hoffnung war auf die Summe gerichtet, die ich meinem Freunde übergeben hatte, auch bat ich ihn, bei ihm wohnen zu dürfen; aber wie erstaunte ich, als dieser mich fragte, warum ich denn nicht mein Haus beziehe! Er sagte mir, daß ein fremder Mann unter meinem Namen ein Haus in dem Quartier der Griechen gekauft habe; derselbe habe auch den Nachbarn gesagt, daß ich bald selbst kommen werde. Ich ging sogleich mit meinem Freunde dahin und wurde von allen meinen Bekannten freudig empfangen. Ein alter Kaufmann gab mir einen Brief, den der Mann, der für mich gekauft hatte, hiergelassen habe.
Ich las: „Zaleukos! Zwei Hände stehen bereit, rastlos zu schaffen, daß Du nicht fühlest den Verlust der einen. Das Haus, das Du siehest, und alles, was darin ist, ist Dein, und alle Jahre wird man Dir so viel reichen, daß Du zu den Reichen Deines Volkes gehören wirst. Mögest Du dem vergeben, der unglücklicher ist als Du.“ Ich konnte ahnen, wer es geschrieben, und der Kaufmann sagte mir auf meine Frage: Es sei ein Mann gewesen, den er für einen Franken gehalten, er habe einen roten Mantel angehabt. Ich wußte genug, um mir zu gestehen, daß der Unbekannte doch nicht ganz von aller edlen Gesinnung entblößt sein müsse. In meinem neuen Haus fand ich alles aufs beste eingerichtet, auch ein Gewölbe mit Waren, schöner als ich sie je gehabt. Zehn Jahre sind seitdem verstrichen; mehr aus alter Gewohnheit, als weil ich es nötig habe, setze ich meine Handelsreisen fort; doch habe ich jenes Land, wo ich so unglücklich wurde, nie mehr gesehen. Jedes Jahr erhielt ich seitdem tausend Goldstücke; aber, wenn es mir auch Freude macht, jenen Unglücklichen edel zu wissen, so kann er mir doch den Kummer meiner Seele nicht abkaufen, denn ewig lebt in mir das grauenvolle Bild der ermordeten Bianka.

Zaleukos, der griechische Kaufmann, hatte seine Geschichte geendigt. Mit großer Teilnahme hatten ihm die übrigen zugehört, besonders der Fremde schien sehr davon ergriffen zu sein; er hatte einigemal tief geseufzt, und Muley schien es sogar, als habe er einmal Tränen in den Augen gehabt. Sie besprachen sich noch lange Zeit über diese Geschichte.
„Und haßt Ihr den Unbekannten nicht, der Euch so schnöd’ um ein so edles Glied Eures Körpers, der selbst Euer Leben in Gefahr brachte?“ fragte der Fremde.
„Wohl gab es in früherer Zeit Stunden“, antwortete der Grieche, „in denen mein Herz ihn vor Gott angeklagt, daß er diesen Kummer über mich gebracht und mein Leben vergiftet habe; aber ich fand Trost in dem Glauben meiner Väter, und dieser befiehlt mir, meine Feinde zu lieben; auch ist er wohl noch unglücklicher als ich.“
„Ihr seid ein edler Mann!“ rief der Fremde und drückte gerührt dem Griechen die Hand.
Der Anführer der Wache unterbrach sie aber in ihrem Gespräch. Er trat mit besorgter Miene in das Zelt und berichtete, daß man sich nicht der Ruhe überlassen dürfe; denn hier sei die Stelle, wo gewöhnlich die Karawanen angegriffen würden, auch glaubten seine Wachen, in der Entfernung mehrere Reiter zu sehen.
Die Kaufleute waren sehr bestürzt über diese Nachricht; Selim, der Fremde, aber wunderte sich über ihre Bestürzung und meinte, daß sie so gut geschätzt wären, daß sie einen Trupp räuberischer Araber nicht zu fürchten brauchten.
„Ja, Herr!“ entgegnete ihm der Anführer der Wache. „Wenn es nur solches Gesindel wäre, könnte man sich ohne Sorge zur Ruhe legen; aber seit einiger Zeit zeigt sich der furchtbare Orbasan wieder, und da gilt es, auf seiner Hut zu sein.“
Der Fremde fragte, wer denn dieser Orbasan sei, und Achmet, der alte Kaufmann, antwortete ihm: „Es gehen allerlei Sagen unter dem Volke über diesen wunderbaren Mann. Die einen halten ihn für ein übermenschliches Wesen, weil er oft mit fünf bis sechs Männern zumal einen Kampf besteht, andere halten ihn für einen tapferen Franken, den das Unglück in diese Gegend verschlagen habe; von allem aber ist nur so viel gewiß, daß er ein verruchter Mörder und Dieb ist.“
„Das könnt Ihr aber doch nicht behaupten“, entgegnete ihm Lezah, einer der Kaufleute. „Wenn er auch ein Räuber ist, so ist er doch ein edler Mann, und als solcher hat er sich an meinem Bruder bewiesen, wie ich Euch erzählen könnte. Er hat seinen ganzen Stamm zu geordneten Menschen gemacht, und so lange er die Wüste durchstreift, darf kein anderer Stamm es wagen, sich sehen zu lassen. Auch raubt er nicht wie andere, sondern er erhebt nur ein Schutzgeld von den Karawanen, und wer ihm dieses willig bezahlt, der ziehet ungefährdet weiter; denn Orbasan ist der Herr der Wüste.“
Also sprachen unter sich die Reisenden im Zelte; die Wachen aber, die um den Lagerplatz ausgestellt waren, begannen unruhig zu werden. Ein ziemlich bedeutender Haufe bewaffneter Reiter zeigte sich in der Entfernung einer halben Stunde; sie schienen gerade auf das Lager zuzureiten. Einer der Männer von der Wache ging daher in das Zelt, um zu verkünden, daß sie wahrscheinlich angegriffen würden. Die Kaufleute berieten sich untereinander, was zu tun sei, ob man ihnen entgegengehen oder den Angriff abwarten solle. Achmet und die zwei älteren Kaufleute wollten das letztere, der feurige Muley aber und Zaleukos verlangten das erstere und riefen den Fremden zu ihrem Beistand auf. Dieser zog ruhig ein kleines, blaues Tuch mit roten Sternen aus seinem Gürtel hervor, band es an eine Lanze und befahl einem der Sklaven, es auf das Zelt zu stecken; er setze sein Leben zum Pfand, sagte er, die Reiter werden, wenn sie dieses Zeichen sehen, ruhig vorüberziehen. Muley glaubte nicht an den Erfolg, der Sklave aber steckte die Lanze auf das Zelt. Inzwischen hatten alle, die im Lager waren, zu den Waffen gegriffen und sahen in gespannter Erwartung den Reitern entgegen. Doch diese schienen das Zeichen auf dem Zelte erblickt zu haben, sie wichen plötzlich von ihrer Richtung auf das Lager ab und zogen in einem großen Bogen auf der Seite hin.
Verwundert standen einige Augenblicke die Reisenden und sahen bald auf die Reiter, bald auf den Fremden. Dieser stand ganz gleichgültig, wie wenn nichts vorgefallen wäre, vor dem Zelte und blickte über die Ebene hin. Endlich brach Muley das Stillschweigen. „Wer bist du, mächtiger Fremdling“, rief er aus, „der du die wilden Horden der Wüste durch einen Wink bezähmst?“
„Ihr schlagt meine Kunst höher an, als sie ist“, antwortete Selim Baruch. „Ich habe mich mit diesem Zeichen versehen, als ich der Gefangenschaft entfloh; was es zu bedeuten hat, weiß ich selbst nicht; nur so viel weiß ich, daß, wer mit diesem Zeichen reiset, unter mächtigem Schutze steht.“
Die Kaufleute dankten dem Fremden und nannten ihn ihren Erretter. Wirklich war auch die Anzahl der Reiter so groß gewesen, daß wohl die Karawane nicht lange hätte Widerstand leisten können.
Mit leichterem Herzen begab man sich jetzt zur Ruhe, und als die Sonne zu sinken begann und der Abendwind über die Sandebene hinstrich, brachen sie auf und zogen weiter.
Am nächsten Tage lagerten sie ungefähr nur noch eine Tagreise von dem Ausgang der Wüste entfernt. Als sich die Reisenden wieder in dem großen Zelt versammelt hatten, nahm Lezah, der Kaufmann, das Wort:
„Ich habe euch gestern gesagt, daß der gefürchtete Orbasan ein edler Mann sei, erlaubt mir, daß ich es euch heute durch die Erzählung der Schicksale meines Bruders beweise. Mein Vater war Kadi in Akara. Er hatte drei Kinder. Ich war der Älteste, ein Bruder und eine Schwester waren bei weitem jünger als ich. Als ich zwanzig Jahre alt war, rief mich ein Bruder meines Vaters zu sich. Er setzte mich zum Erben seiner Güter ein, mit der Bedingung, daß ich bis zu seinem Tode bei ihm bleibe. Aber er erreichte ein hohes Alter, so daß ich erst vor zwei Jahren in meine Heimat zurückkehrte und nichts davon wußte, welch schreckliches Schicksal indes mein Haus betroffen und wie gütig Allah es gewendet hatte.“


DIE ERRETTUNG FATMES

Mein Bruder Mustapha und meine Schwester Fatme waren beinahe in gleichem Alter; jener hatte höchstens zwei Jahre voraus. Sie liebten einander innig und trugen vereint alles bei, was unserem kränklichen Vater die Last seines Alters erleichtern konnte. An Fatmes sechzehntem Geburtstage veranstaltete der Bruder ein Fest. Er ließ alle ihre Gespielinnen einladen, setzte ihnen in dem Garten des Vaters ausgesuchte Speisen vor, und als es Abend wurde, lud er sie ein, auf einer Barke, die er gemietet und festlich geschmückt hatte, ein wenig hinaus in die See zu fahren. Fatme und ihre Gespielinnen willigten mit Freuden ein; denn der Abend war schön, und die Stadt gewährte besonders abends, von dem Meere aus betrachtet, einen herrlichen Anblick. Den Mädchen aber gefiel es so gut auf der Barke, daß sie meinen Bruder bewogen, immer weiter in die See hinauszufahren. Mustapha gab aber ungern nach, weil sich vor einigen Tagen ein Korsar hatte sehen lassen. Nicht weit von der Stadt zieht sich ein Vorgebirge in das Meer. Dorthin wollten noch die Mädchen, um von da die Sonne in das Meer sinken zu sehen. Als sie um das Vorgebirg’ herumruderten, sahen sie in geringer Entfernung eine Barke, die mit Bewaffneten besetzt war. Nichts Gutes ahnend, befahl mein Bruder den Ruderern, sein Schiff zu drehen und dem Lande zuzurudern. Wirklich schien sich auch seine Besorgnis zu bestätigen; denn jene Barke kam der meines Bruders schnell nach, überholte sie, da sie mehr Ruder hatte, und hielt sich immer zwischen dem Land, und unserer Barke. Die Mädchen aber, als sie die Gefahr erkannten, in der sie schwebten, sprangen auf und schrien und klagten; umsonst suchte sie Mustapha zu beruhigen, umsonst stellte er ihnen vor, ruhig zu bleiben, weil sie durch ihr Hin- und Herrennen die Barke in Gefahr brächten umzuschlagen. Es half nichts, und da sie sich endlich bei Annäherung des anderen Bootes alle auf die hintere Seite der Barke stürzten, schlug diese um. Indessen aber hatte man vom Land aus die Bewegungen des fremden Bootes beobachtet, und da man schon seit einiger Zeit Besorgnisse wegen Korsaren hegte, hatte dieses Boot Verdacht erregt, und mehrere Barken stießen vom Lande, um den Unsrigen beizustehen. Aber sie kamen nur noch zu rechter Zeit, um die Untersinkenden aufzunehmen. In der Verwirrung war das feindliche Boot entwischt, auf den beiden Barken aber, welche die Geretteten aufgenommen hatten, war man ungewiß, ob alle gerettet seien. Man näherte sich gegenseitig, und ach! Es fand sich, daß meine Schwester und eine ihrer Gespielinnen fehlten; zugleich entdeckte man aber einen Fremden in einer der Barken, den niemand kannte. Auf die Drohungen Mustaphas gestand er, daß er zu dem feindlichen Schiff, das zwei Meilen ostwärts vor Anker liege, gehöre, und daß ihn seine Gefährten auf ihrer eiligen Flucht im Stich gelassen hätten, indem er im Begriff gewesen sei, die Mädchen auffischen zu helfen; auch sagte er aus, daß er gesehen habe, wie man zwei derselben in das Schiff gezogen.
Der Schmerz meines alten Vaters war grenzenlos, aber auch Mustapha war bis zum Tod betrübt, denn nicht nur, daß seine geliebte Schwester verloren war und daß er sich anklagte, an ihrem Unglück schuld zu sein—jene Freundin Fatmes, die ihr Unglück teilte, war von ihren Eltern ihm zur Gattin zugesagt gewesen, und nur unserem Vater hatte er es noch nicht zu gestehen gewagt, weil ihre Eltern arm und von geringer Abkunft waren. Mein Vater aber war ein strenger Mann; als sein Schmerz sich ein wenig gelegt hatte, ließ er Mustapha vor sich kommen und sprach zu ihm: „Deine Torheit hat mir den Trost meines Alters und die Freude meiner Augen geraubt. Gehe hin, ich verbanne dich auf ewig von meinem Angesicht, ich fluche dir und deinen Nachkommen, aber nur, wenn du mir Fatme wiederbringst, soll dein Haupt rein sein von dem Fluche des Vaters.“
Dies hatte mein armer Bruder nicht erwartet; schon vorher hatte er sich entschlossen gehabt, seine Schwester und ihre Freundin aufzusuchen, und wollte sich nur noch den Segen des Vaters dazu erbitten, und jetzt schickte er ihn, mit dem Fluch beladen, in die Welt. Aber hatte ihn jener Jammer vorher gebeugt, so stählte jetzt die Fülle des Unglücks, das er nicht verdient hatte, seinen Mut.
Er ging zu dem gefangenen Seeräuber und befragte ihn, wohin die Fahrt seines Schiffes ginge, und erfuhr, daß sie Sklavenhandel trieben und gewöhnlich in Balsora großen Markt hielten.
Als er wieder nach Hause kam, um sich zur Reise anzuschicken, schien sich der Zorn des Vaters ein wenig gelegt zu haben, denn er sandte ihm einen Beutel mit Gold zur Unterstützung auf der Reise. Mustapha aber nahm weinend von den Eltern Zoraides, so hieß seine geliebte Braut, Abschied und machte sich auf den Weg nach Balsora.
Mustapha machte die Reise zu Land, weil von unserer kleinen Stadt aus nicht gerade ein Schiff nach Balsora ging. Er mußte daher sehr starke Tagreisen machen, um nicht zu lange nach den Seeräubern nach Balsora zu kommen; doch da er ein gutes Roß und kein Gepäck hatte, konnte er hoffen, diese Stadt am Ende des sechsten Tages zu erreichen. Aber am Abend des vierten Tages, als er ganz allein seines Weges ritt, fielen ihn plötzlich drei Männer an. Da er merkte, daß sie gut bewaffnet und stark seien und daß es mehr auf sein Geld und sein Roß als auf sein Leben abgesehen war, so rief er ihnen zu, daß er sich ihnen ergeben wolle. Sie stiegen von ihren Pferden ab und banden ihm die Füße unter dem Bauch seines Tieres zusammen; ihn selbst aber nahmen sie in die Mitte und trabten, indem einer den Zügel seines Pferdes ergriff, schnell mit ihm davon, ohne jedoch ein Wort zu sprechen.
Mustapha gab sich einer dumpfen Verzweiflung hin, der Fluch seines Vaters schien schon jetzt an dem Unglücklichen in Erfüllung zu gehen, und wie konnte er hoffen, seine Schwester und Zoraide zu retten, wenn er, aller Mittel beraubt, nur sein ärmliches Leben zu ihrer Befreiung aufwenden konnte. Mustapha und seine stummen Begleiter mochten wohl eine Stunde geritten sein, als sie in ein kleines Seitental einbogen. Das Tälchen war von hohen Bäumen eingefaßt; ein weicher dunkelgrüner Rasen, ein Bach, der schnell durch seine Mitte hinrollte, luden zur Ruhe ein. Wirklich sah er auch fünfzehn bis zwanzig Zelte dort aufgeschlagen; an den Pflöcken der Zelte waren Kamele und schöne Pferde angebunden, aus einem der Zelte hervor tönte die lustige Weise einer Zither und zweier schöner Männerstimmen. Meinem Bruder schien es, als ob Leute, die ein so fröhliches Lagerplätzchen sich erwählt hatten, nichts Böses gegen ihn im Sinne haben könnten, und er folgte also ohne Bangigkeit dem Ruf seiner Führer, die, als sie seine Bande gelöst hatten, ihm winkten, abzusteigen. Man führte ihn in ein Zelt, das größer als die übrigen und im Innern hübsch, fast zierlich aufgeputzt war. Prächtige, goldbestickte Polster, gewirkte Fußteppiche, übergoldete Rauchpfannen hätten anderswo Reichtum und Wohlleben verraten; hier schienen sie nur kühner Raub. Auf einem der Polster saß ein alter kleiner Mann; sein Gesicht war häßlich, seine Haut schwarzbraun und glänzend, und ein widriger Zug von tückischer Schlauheit um Augen und Mund machte seinen Anblick verhaßt. Obgleich sich dieser Mann einiges Ansehen zu geben suchte, so merkte doch Mustapha bald, daß nicht für ihn das Zelt so reich geschmückt sei, und die Unterredung seiner Führer schien seine Bemerkung zu bestätigen. „Wo ist der Starke?“ fragten sie den Kleinen.
„Er ist auf der kleinen Jagd“, antwortete jener, „aber er hat mir aufgetragen, seine Stelle zu versehen.“
„Das hat er nicht gescheit gemacht“, entgegnete einer der Räuber, „denn es muß sich bald entscheiden, ob dieser Hund sterben oder zahlen soll, und das weiß der Starke besser als du.“
Der kleine Mann erhob sich im Gefühl seiner Würde, streckte sich lang aus, um mit der Spitze seiner Hand das Ohr seines Gegners zu erreichen, denn er schien Lust zu haben, sich durch einen Schlag zu rächen, als er aber sah, daß seine Bemühung fruchtlos sei, fing er an zu schimpfen (und wahrlich! Die anderen blieben ihm nichts schuldig), daß das Zelt von ihrem Streit erdröhnte. Da tat sich auf einmal die Türe des Zeltes auf, und herein trat ein hoher, stattlicher Mann, jung und schön wie ein Perserprinz; seine Kleidung und seine Waffen waren, außer einem reichbesetzten Dolch und einem glänzenden Säbel, gering und einfach; aber sein ernstes Auge, sein ganzer Anstand gebot Achtung, ohne Furcht einzuflößen.
„Wer ist’s, der es wagt, in meinem Zelte Streit zu beginnen?“ rief er den Erschrockenen zu. Eine Zeitlang herrschte tiefe Stille; endlich erzählte einer von denen, die Mustapha hergebracht hatten, wie es gegangen sei. Da schien sich das Gesicht „des Starken“, wie sie ihn nannten, vor Zorn zu röten. „Wann hätte ich dich je an meine Stelle gesetzt, Hassan?“ schrie er mit furchtbarer Stimme dem Kleinen zu. Dieser zog sich vor Furcht in sich selbst zusammen, daß er noch viel kleiner aussah als zuvor, und schlich sich der Zelttüre zu. Ein hinlänglicher Tritt des Starken machte, daß er in einem großen sonderbaren Sprung zur Zelttüre hinausflog.
Als der Kleine verschwunden war, führten die drei Männer Mustapha vor den Herrn des Zeltes, der sich indes auf die Polster gelegt hatte. „Hier bringen wir den, welchen du uns zu fangen befohlen hast.“
Jener blickte den Gefangenen lange an und sprach sodann: „Bassa von Sulieika! Dein eigenes Gewissen wird dir sagen, warum du vor Orbasan stehst.“
Als mein Bruder dies hörte, warf er sich nieder vor jenem und antwortete: „O Herr! Du scheinst im Irrtum zu sein. Ich bin ein armer Unglücklicher, aber nicht der Bassa, den du suchst!“
Alle im Zelt waren über diese Rede erstaunt. Der Herr des Zeltes aber sprach: „Es kann dir wenig helfen, dich zu verstellen; denn ich will die Leute vorführen, die dich wohl kennen.“ Er befahl, Zuleima vorzufahren. Man brachte ein altes Weib in das Zelt, das auf die Frage, ob sie in meinem Bruder nicht den Bassa von Sulieika erkenne, antwortete: „Jawohl!“ Und sie schwöre es beim Grab des Propheten, es sei der Bassa und kein anderer.
„Siehst du, Erbärmlicher, wie deine List zu Wasser geworden ist!“ begann zürnend der Starke. „Du bist mir zu elend, als daß ich meinen guten Dolch mit deinem Blut besudeln sollte, aber an den Schweif meines Rosses will ich dich binden, morgen, wenn die Sonne aufgeht, und durch die Wälder mit dir jagen, bis sie scheidet hinter die Hügel von Sulieika!“
Da sank meinem armen Bruder der Mut. „Das ist der Fluch meines harten Vaters, der mich zum schmachvollen Tode treibt“, rief er weinend, „und auch du bist verloren, süße Schwester, auch du, Zoraide!“
„Deine Verstellung hilft dir nichts“, sprach einer der Räuber, indem er ihm die Hände auf den Rücken band, „mach, daß du aus dem Zelte kommst! Denn der Starke beißt sich in die Lippen und blickt nach seinem Dolch. Wenn du noch eine Nacht leben willst, so komm!“
Als die Räuber gerade meinen Bruder aus dem Zelt führen wollten, begegneten sie drei anderen, die einen Gefangenen vor sich hintrieben. Sie traten mit ihm ein. „Hier bringen wir den Bassa, wie du uns befohlen hast“, sprachen sie und führten den Gefangenen vor das Polster des Starken. Als der Gefangene dorthin geführt wurde, hatte mein Bruder Gelegenheit, ihn zu betrachten, und ihm selbst fiel die Ähnlichkeit auf, die dieser Mann mit ihm hatte, nur war er dunkler im Gesicht und hatte einen schwärzeren Bart.
Der Starke schien sehr erstaunt über die Erscheinung des zweiten Gefangenen. „Wer von euch ist denn der Rechte?“ sprach er, indem er bald meinen Bruder, bald den anderen Mann ansah.
„Wenn du den Bassa von Sulieika meinst“, antwortete in stolzem Ton der Gefangene, „der bin ich!“ Der Starke sah ihn lange mit seinem ernsten, furchtbaren Blick an; dann winkte er schweigend, den Bassa wegzuführen.
Als dies geschehen war, ging er auf meinen Bruder zu, zerschnitt seine Bande mit dem Dolch und winkte ihm, sich zu ihm aufs Polster zu setzen. „Es tut mir leid, Fremdling“, sagte er, „daß ich dich für jenes Ungeheuer hielt; schreibe es aber einer sonderbaren Fügung des Himmels zu, die dich gerade in der Stunde, welche dem Untergang jenes Verruchten geweiht war, in die Hände meiner Brüder führte.“ Mein Bruder bat ihn um die einzige Gunst, ihn gleich wieder weiterreisen zu lassen, weil jeder Aufschub ihm verderblich werden könne. Der Starke erkundigte sich nach seinen eiligen Geschäften, und als ihm Mustapha alles erzählt hatte, überredete ihn jener, diese Nacht in seinem Zelt zu bleiben, er und sein Roß werden der Ruhe bedürfen; den folgenden Tag aber wolle er ihm einen Weg zeigen, der ihn in anderthalb Tagen nach Balsora bringe—Mein Bruder schlug ein, wurde trefflich bewirtet und schlief sanft bis zum Morgen in dem Zelt des Räubers.
Als er aufgewacht war, sah er sich ganz allein im Zelt; vor dem Vorhang des Zeltes aber hörte er mehrere Stimmen zusammen sprechen, die dem Herrn des Zeltes und dem kleinen schwarzbraunen Mann anzugehören schienen. Er lauschte ein wenig und hörte zu seinem Schrecken, daß der Kleine dringend den anderen aufforderte, den Fremden zu töten, weil er, wenn er freigelassen würde, sie alle verraten könnte.
Mustapha merkte gleich, daß der Kleine ihm gram sei, weil er die Ursache war, daß er gestern so übel behandelt wurde; der Starke schien sich einige Augenblicke zu besinnen. „Nein“, sprach er, „er ist mein Gastfreund, und das Gastrecht ist mir heilig; auch sieht er mir nicht aus, als ob er uns verraten wollte.“
Als er so gesprochen, schlug er den Vorhang zurück und trat ein. „Friede sei mit dir, Mustapha!“ sprach er, „laß uns den Morgentrunk kosten, und rüste dich dann zum Aufbruch!“ Er reichte meinem Bruder einen Becher Sorbet, und als sie getrunken hatten, zäumten sie die Pferde auf, und wahrlich, mit leichterem Herzen, als er gekommen war, schwang sich Mustapha aufs Pferd. Sie hatten bald die Zelte im Rücken und schlugen dann einen breiten Pfad ein, der in den Wald führte. Der Starke erzählte meinem Bruder, daß jener Bassa, den sie auf der Jagd gefangen hätten, ihnen versprochen habe, sie ungefährdet in seinem Gebiete zu dulden; vor einigen Wochen aber habe er einen ihrer tapfersten Männer aufgefangen und nach den schrecklichsten Martern aufhängen lassen. Er habe ihm nun lange auflauern lassen, und heute noch müsse er sterben. Mustapha wagte es nicht, etwas dagegen einzuwenden; denn er war froh, selbst mit heiler Haut davongekommen zu sein.
Am Ausgang des Waldes hielt der Starke sein Pferd an, beschrieb meinem Bruder den Weg, bot ihm die Hand zum Abschied und sprach: „Mustapha, du bist auf sonderbare Weise der Gastfreund des Räubers Orbasan geworden; ich will dich nicht auffordern, nicht zu verraten, was du gesehen und gehört hast. Du hast ungerechterweise Todesangst ausgestanden, und ich bin dir Vergütung schuldig. Nimm diesen Dolch als Andenken, und so du Hilfe brauchst, so sende ihn mir zu, und ich will eilen, dir beizustehen. Diesen Beutel aber kannst du vielleicht zu deiner Reise brauchen.“ Mein Bruder dankte ihm für seinen Edelmut; er nahm den Dolch, den Beutel aber schlug er aus. Doch Orbasan drückte ihm noch einmal die Hand, ließ den Beutel auf die Erde fallen und sprengte mit Sturmeseile in den Wald. Als Mustapha sah, daß er ihn doch nicht mehr werde einholen können, stieg er ab, um den Beutel aufzuheben, und erschrak über die Größe von seines Gastfreundes Großmut; denn der Beutel enthielt eine Menge Gold. Er dankte Allah für seine Rettung, empfahl ihm den edlen Räuber in seine Gnade und zog dann heiteren Mutes weiter auf seinem Wege nach Balsora.
Lezah schwieg und sah Achmet, den alten Kaufmann, fragend an. „Nein, wenn es so ist“, sprach dieser, „so verbessere ich gern mein Urteil von Orbasan; denn wahrlich, an deinem Bruder hat er schön gehandelt.“
„Er hat getan wie ein braver Muselmann“, rief Muley; „aber ich hoffe, du hast deine Geschichte damit nicht geschlossen; denn wie mich bedünkt, sind wir alle begierig, weiter zu hören, wie es deinem Bruder erging und ob er Fatme, deine Schwester, und die schöne Zoraide befreit hat.“
„Wenn ich euch nicht damit langweile, erzähle ich gerne weiter“, entgegnete Lezah, „denn die Geschichte meines Bruders ist allerdings abenteuerlich und wundervoll.“
Am Mittag des siebenten Tages nach seiner Abreise zog Mustapha in die Tore von Balsora ein. Sobald er in einer Karawanserei abgestiegen war, fragte er, wann der Sklavenmarkt, der alljährlich hier gehalten werde, anfange. Aber er erhielt die Schreckensantwort, daß er zwei Tage zu spät komme. Man bedauerte seine Verspätung und erzählte ihm, daß er viel verloren habe; denn noch an dem letzten Tage des Marktes seien zwei Sklavinnen angekommen, von so hoher Schönheit, daß sie die Augen aller Käufer auf sich gezogen hätten. Man habe sich ordentlich um sie gerissen und geschlagen, und sie seien freilich auch zu einem so hohen Preise verkauft worden, daß ihn nur ihr jetziger Herr nicht habe scheuen können. Er erkundigte sich näher nach diesen beiden, und es blieb ihm kein Zweifel, daß es die Unglücklichen seien, die er suchte. Auch erfuhr er, daß der Mann, der sie beide gekauft habe, vierzig Stunden von Balsora wohne und Thiuli-Kos heiße, ein vornehmer, reicher, aber schon ältlicher Mann, der früher Kapudan-Bassa des Großherrn gewesen, jetzt aber sich mit seinen gesammelten Reichtümern zur Ruhe gesetzt habe.
Mustapha wollte von Anfang sich gleich wieder zu Pferd setzen, um dem Thiuli-Kos, der kaum einen Tag Vorsprung haben konnte, nachzueilen. Als er aber bedachte, daß er als einzelner Mann dem mächtigen Reisenden doch nichts anhaben noch weniger seine Beute ihm abjagen konnte, sann er auf einen anderen Plan und hatte ihn auch bald gefunden. Die Verwechslung mit dem Bassa von Sulieika, die ihm beinahe so gefährlich geworden wäre, brachte ihn auf den Gedanken, unter diesem Namen in das Haus des Thiuli-Kos zu gehen und so einen Versuch zur Rettung der beiden unglücklichen Mädchen zu wagen. Er mietete daher einige Diener und Pferde, wobei ihm Orbasans Geld trefflich zustatten kam, schaffte sich und seinen Dienern prächtige Kleider an und machte sich auf den Weg nach dem Schlosse Thiulis. Nach fünf Tagen war er in die Nähe dieses Schlosses gekommen. Es lag in einer schönen Ebene und war rings von hohen Mauern umschlossen, die nur ganz wenig von den Gebäuden überragt wurden. Als Mustapha dort angekommen war, färbte er Haar und Bart schwarz, sein Gesicht aber bestrich er mit dem Saft einer Pflanze, die ihm eine bräunliche Farbe gab, ganz wie sie jener Bassa gehabt hatte. Er schickte hierauf einen seiner Diener in das Schloß und ließ im Namen des Bassa von Sulieika um ein Nachtlager bitten. Der Diener kam bald wieder, und mit ihm vier schöngekleidete Sklaven, die Mustaphas Pferd am Zügel nahmen und in den Schloßhof führten. Dort halfen sie ihm selbst vom Pferd, und vier andere geleiteten ihn eine breite Marmortreppe hinauf zu Thiuli.
Dieser, ein alter, lustiger Geselle, empfing meinen Bruder ehrerbietig und ließ ihm das Beste, was sein Koch zubereiten konnte, aufsetzen. Nach Tisch brachte Mustapha das Gespräch nach und nach auf die neuen Sklavinnen, und Thiuli rühmte ihre Schönheit und beklagte nur, daß sie immer so traurig seien; doch er glaubte, dieses würde sich bald geben. Mein Bruder war sehr vergnügt über diesen Empfang und legte sich mit den schönsten Hoffnungen zur Ruhe nieder.
Er mochte ungefähr eine Stunde geschlafen haben, da weckte ihn der Schein einer Lampe, der blendend auf sein Auge fiel. Als er sich aufrichtete, glaubte er noch zu träumen; denn vor ihm stand jener kleine, schwarzbraune Kerl aus Orbasans Zelt, eine Lampe in der Hand, sein breites Maul zu einem widrigen Lächeln verzogen. Mustapha zwickte sich in den Arm, zupfte sich an der Nase, um sich zu überzeugen, ob er denn wache; aber die Erscheinung blieb wie zuvor. „Was willst du an meinem Bette?“ rief Mustapha, als er sich von seinem Erstaunen erholt hatte.
„Bemühet Euch doch nicht so, Herr!“ sprach der Kleine. „Ich habe wohl erraten, weswegen Ihr hierherkommt. Auch war mir Euer wertes Gesicht noch wohl erinnerlich; doch wahrlich, wenn ich nicht den Bassa mit eigener Hand hätte erhängen helfen, so hättet Ihr mich vielleicht getäuscht. Jetzt aber bin ich da, um eine Frage zu machen.“
„Vor allem sage, wie du hierherkommst“, entgegnete ihm Mustapha voll Wut, daß er verraten war.
„Das will ich Euch sagen“, antwortete jener, „ich konnte mich mit dem Starken nicht länger vertragen, deswegen floh ich; aber du, Mustapha, warst eigentlich die Ursache unseres Streites, und dafür mußt du mir deine Schwester zur Frau geben, und ich will Euch zur Flucht behilflich sein; gibst du sie nicht, so gehe ich zu meinem neuen Herrn und erzähle ihm etwas von dem neuen Bassa.“
Mustapha war vor Schrecken und Wut außer sich; jetzt, wo er sich am sicheren Ziel seiner Wünsche glaubte, sollte dieser Elende kommen und sie vereiteln; es war nur ein Mittel, das seinen Plan retten konnte: Er mußte das kleine Ungetüm töten. Mit einem Sprung fuhr er daher aus dem Bette auf den Kleinen zu; doch dieser, der etwas Solches geahnt haben mochte, ließ die Lampe fallen, daß sie verlöschte, und entsprang im Dunkeln, indem er mörderisch um Hilfe schrie.
Jetzt war guter Rat teuer; die Mädchen mußte er für den Augenblick aufgeben und nur auf die eigene Rettung denken; daher ging er an das Fenster, um zu sehen, ob er nicht entspringen könnte. Es war eine ziemliche Tiefe bis zum Boden, und auf der anderen Seite stand eine hohe Mauer, die zu übersteigen war. Sinnend stand er an dem Fenster; da hörte er viele Stimmen sich seinem Zimmer nähern; schon waren sie an der Türe; da faßte er verzweiflungsvoll seinen Dolch und seine Kleider und schwang sich zum Fenster hinaus. Der Fall war hart; aber er fühlte, daß er kein Glied gebrochen hatte; drum sprang er auf und lief der Mauer zu, die den Hof umschloß, stieg, zum Erstaunen seiner Verfolger, hinauf und befand sich bald im Freien. Er floh, bis er an einen kleinen Wald kam, wo er sich erschöpft niederwarf. Hier überlegte er, was zu tun sei.
Seine Pferde und seine Diener hatte er im Stiche lassen müssen; aber sein Geld, das er in dem Gürtel trug, hatte er gerettet.
Sein erfinderischer Kopf zeigte ihm bald einen anderen Weg zur Rettung. Er ging in dem Wald weiter, bis er an ein Dorf kam, wo er um geringen Preis ein Pferd kaufte, das ihn in Bälde in eine Stadt trug. Dort forschte er nach einem Arzt, und man riet ihm einen alten, erfahrenen Mann. Diesen bewog er durch einige Goldstücke, daß er ihm eine Arznei mitteilte, die einen todähnlichen Schlaf herbeiführte, der durch ein anderes Mittel augenblicklich wieder gehoben werden könnte. Als er im Besitz dieses Mittels war, kaufte er sich einen langen falschen Bart, einen schwarzen Talar und allerlei Büchsen und Kolben, so daß er füglich einen reisenden Arzt vorstellen konnte, lud seine Sachen auf einen Esel und reiste in das Schloß des Thiuli-Kos zurück. Er durfte gewiß sein, diesmal nicht erkannt zu werden, denn der Bart entstellte ihn so, daß er sich selbst kaum mehr kannte. Bei Thiuli angekommen, ließ er sich als den Arzt Chakamankabudibaba anmelden, und, wie er es gedacht hatte, geschah es; der prachtvolle Namen empfahl ihn bei dem alten Narren ungemein, so daß er ihn gleich zur Tafel einlud.
Chakamankabudibaba erschien vor Thiuli, und als sie sich kaum eine Stunde besprochen hatten, beschloß der Alte, alle seine Sklavinnen der Kur des weisen Arztes zu unterwerfen. Dieser konnte seine Freude kaum verbergen, daß er jetzt seine geliebte Schwester wiedersehen solle, und folgte mit klopfendem Herzen Thiuli, der ihn ins Serail führte. Sie waren in ein Zimmer gekommen, das schön ausgeschmückt war, worin sich aber niemand befand. „Chambaba oder wie du heißt, lieber Arzt“, sprach Thiuli-Kos, „betrachte einmal jenes Loch dort in der Mauer, dort wird jede meiner Sklavinnen einen Arm herausstrecken, und du kannst dann untersuchen, ob der Puls krank oder gesund ist.“ Mustapha mochte einwenden, was er wollte, zu sehen bekam er sie nicht; doch willigte Thiuli ein, daß er ihm allemal sagen wolle, wie sie sich sonst gewöhnlich befänden. Thiuli zog nun einen langen Zettel aus dem Gürtel und begann mit lauter Stimme seine Sklavinnen einzeln beim Namen zu rufen, worauf allemal eine Hand aus der Mauer kam und der Arzt den Puls untersuchte. Sechs waren schon abgelesen und sämtlich für gesund erklärt; da las Thiuli als die siebente „Fatme“ ab, und eine kleine weiße Hand schlüpfte aus der Mauer. Zitternd vor Freude, ergreift Mustapha diese Hand und erklärt sie mit wichtiger Miene für bedeutend krank. Thiuli ward sehr besorgt und befahl seinem weisen Chakamankabudibaba, schnell eine Arznei für sie zu bereiten. Der Arzt ging hinaus, schrieb auf einen kleinen Zettel: Fatme! Ich will Dich retten, wenn Du Dich entschließen kannst, eine Arznei zu nehmen, die Dich auf zwei Tage tot macht; doch ich besitze das Mittel, Dich wieder zum Leben zu bringen. Willst Du, so sage nur, dieser Trank habe nicht geholfen, und es soll mir ein Zeichen sein, daß Du einwilligst.
Bald kam er in das Zimmer zurück, wo Thiuli seiner harrte. Er brachte ein unschädliches Tränklein mit, fühlte der kranken Fatme noch einmal den Puls und schob ihr zugleich den Zettel unter ihr Armband; das Tränklein aber reichte er ihr durch die Öffnung in der Mauer. Thiuli schien in großen Sorgen wegen Fatme zu sein und schob die Untersuchung der übrigen bis auf eine gelegenere Zeit auf. Als er mit Mustapha das Zimmer verlassen hatte, sprach er in traurigem Ton: „Chadibaba, sage aufrichtig, was hältst du von Fatmes Krankheit?“
Chakamankabudibaba antwortete mit einem tiefen Seufzer: „Ach Herr, möge der Prophet dir Trost verleihen! Sie hat ein schleichendes Fieber, das ihr wohl den Garaus machen kann.“ Da entbrannte der Zorn Thiulis: „Was sagst du, verfluchter Hund von einem Arzt? Sie, um die ich zweitausend Goldstücke gab, soll mir sterben wie eine Kuh? Wisse, wenn du sie nicht rettest, so hau’ ich dir den Kopf ab!“ Da merkte mein Bruder, daß er einen dummen Streich gemacht habe, und gab Thiuli wieder Hoffnung. Als sie noch so sprachen, kam ein schwarzer Sklave aus dem Serail, dem Arzt zu sagen, daß das Tränklein nicht geholfen habe. „Biete deine ganze Kunst auf, Chakamdababelba, oder wie du dich schreibst, ich zahle dir, was du willst“, schrie Thiuli-Kos, fast heulend vor Angst, so viel Gold zu verlieren.
„Ich will ihr ein Säftlein geben, das sie von aller Not befreit“, antwortete der Arzt.
„Ja! Ja! Gib ihr ein Säftlein“, schluchzte der alte Thiuli.
Frohen Mutes ging Mustapha, seinen Schlaftrunk zu holen, und als er ihn dem schwarzen Sklaven gegeben und gezeigt hatte, wieviel man auf einmal nehmen müsse, ging er zu Thiuli und sagte, er müsse noch einige heilsame Kräuter am See holen, und eilte zum Tor hinaus. An dem See, der nicht weit von dem Schloß entfernt war, zog er seine falschen Kleider aus und warf sie ins Wasser, daß sie lustig umherschwammen; er selbst aber verbarg sich im Gesträuch, wartete die Nacht ab und schlich sich dann in den Begräbnisplatz an dem Schlosse Thiulis.
Als Mustapha kaum eine Stunde lang aus dem Schloß abwesend sein mochte, brachte man Thiuli die schreckliche Nachricht, daß seine Sklavin Fatme im Sterben liege. Er schickte hinaus an den See, um schnell den Arzt zu holen; aber bald kehrten seine Boten allein zurück und erzählten ihm, daß der arme Arzt ins Wasser gefallen und ertrunken sei; seinen schwarzen Talar sehe man im See schwimmen, und hier und da gucke auch sein stattlicher Bart aus den Wellen hervor. Als Thiuli keine Rettung mehr sah, verwünschte er sich und die ganze Welt, raufte sich den Bart aus und rannte mit dem Kopf gegen die Mauer. Aber alles dies konnte nichts helfen; denn Fatme gab bald unter den Händen der übrigen Weiber den Geist auf. Als Thiuli die Nachricht ihres Todes hörte, befahl er, schnell einen Sarg zu machen; denn er konnte keinen Toten im Hause leiden und ließ den Leichnam in das Begräbnishaus tragen. Die Träger brachten den Sarg dorthin, setzten ihn schnell nieder und entflohen, denn sie hatten unter den übrigen Särgen Stöhnen und Seufzen gehört.
Mustapha, der sich hinter den Särgen verborgen und von dort aus die Träger des Sarges in die Flucht gejagt hatte, kam hervor und zündete sich eine Lampe an, die er zu diesem Zweck mitgebracht hatte. Dann zog er ein Glas hervor, das die erweckende Arznei enthielt, und hob dann den Deckel von Fatmes Sarg. Aber welches Entsetzen befiel ihn, als sich ihm beim Scheine der Lampe ganz fremde Züge zeigten! Weder meine Schwester noch Zoraide, sondern eine ganz andere lag in dem Sarg. Er brauchte lange, um sich von dem neuen Schlag des Schicksals zu fassen; endlich überwog doch Mitleid seinen Zorn. Er öffnete sein Glas und flößte ihr die Arznei ein. Sie atmete, sie schlug die Augen auf und schien sich lange zu besinnen, wo sie sei. Endlich erinnerte sie sich des Vorgefallenen; sie stand auf aus dem Sarg und stürzte zu Mustaphas Füßen. „Wie kann ich dir danken, gütiges Wesen“, rief sie aus, „daß du mich aus meiner schrecklichen Gefangenschaft befreitest!“ Mustapha unterbrach ihre Danksagungen mit der Frage, wie es denn geschehen sei, daß sie und nicht Fatme, seine Schwester, gerettet worden sei? Jene sah ihn staunend an. „Jetzt wird mir meine Rettung erst klar, die mir vorher unbegreiflich war“, antwortete sie; „wisse, man hieß mich in jenem Schloß Fatme, und mir hast du deinen Zettel und den Rettungstrank gegeben.“ Mein Bruder forderte die Gerettete auf, ihm von seiner Schwester und Zoraide Nachricht zu geben, und erfuhr, daß sie sich beide im Schloß befanden, aber nach der Gewohnheit Thiulis andere Namen bekommen hatten; sie hießen jetzt Mirza und Nurmahal.“
Als Fatme, die gerettete Sklavin, sah, daß mein Bruder durch diesen Fehlgriff so niedergeschlagen sei, sprach sie ihm Mut ein und versprach, ihm ein Mittel zu sagen, wie er jene beiden Mädchen dennoch retten könne. Aufgeweckt durch diesen Gedanken, schöpfte Mustapha von neuem Hoffnung und bat sie, dieses Mittel ihm zu nennen, und sie sprach:
„Ich bin zwar erst seit fünf Monaten die Sklavin Thiulis, doch habe ich gleich von Anfang auf Rettung gesonnen; aber für mich allein war sie zu schwer. In dem inneren Hof des Schlosses wirst du einen Brunnen bemerkt haben, der aus zehn Röhren Wasser speit; dieser Brunnen fiel mir auf. Ich erinnerte mich, in dem Hause meines Vaters einen ähnlichen gesehen zu haben, dessen Wasser durch eine geräumige Wasserleitung herbeiströmt; um nun zu erfahren, ob dieser Brunnen auch so gebaut ist, rühmte ich eines Tages vor Thiuli seine Pracht und fragte nach seinem Baumeister. *Ich selbst habe ihn gebaut*, antwortete er, *und das, was du hier siehst, ist noch das Geringste; aber das Wasser dazu kommt wenigstens tausend Schritte weit von einem Bach her und geht durch eine gewölbte Wasserleitung, die wenigstens mannshoch ist; und alles dies habe ich selbst angegeben.* Als ich dies gehört hatte, wünschte ich mir oft, nur auf einen Augenblick die Stärke eines Mannes zu haben, um einen Stein an der Seite des Brunnens ausheben zu können; dann könnte ich fliehen, wohin ich wollte. Die Wasserleitung nun will ich dir zeigen; durch sie kannst du nachts in das Schloß gelangen und jene befreien. Aber du mußt wenigstens noch zwei Männer bei dir haben, um die Sklaven, die das Serail bei Nacht bewachen, zu überwältigen.“
So sprach sie; mein Bruder Mustapha aber, obgleich schon zweimal in seinen Hoffnungen getäuscht, faßte noch einmal Mut und hoffte mit Allahs Hilfe den Plan der Sklavin auszuführen. Er versprach ihr, für ihr weiteres Fortkommen in ihre Heimat zu sorgen, wenn sie ihm behilflich sein wollte, ins Schloß zu gelangen. Aber ein Gedanke machte ihm noch Sorge, nämlich der, woher er zwei oder drei treue Gehilfen bekommen könnte. Da fiel ihm Orbasans Dolch ein und das Versprechen, das ihm jener gegeben hatte, ihm, wo er seiner bedürfe, zu Hilfe zu eilen, und er machte sich daher mit Fatme aus dem Begräbnis auf, um den Räuber aufzusuchen.
In der nämlichen Stadt, wo er sich zum Arzt umgewandelt hatte, kaufte er um sein letztes Geld ein Roß und mietete Fatme bei einer armen Frau in der Vorstadt ein. Er selbst aber eilte dem Gebirge zu, wo er Orbasan zum erstenmal getroffen hatte, und gelangte in drei Tagen dahin. Er fand bald wieder jene Zelte und trat unverhofft vor Orbasan, der ihn freundlich bewillkommnete. Er erzählte ihm seine mißlungenen Versuche, wobei sich der ernsthafte Orbasan nicht enthalten konnte, hier und da ein wenig zu lachen, besonders, wenn er sich den Arzt Chakamankabudibaba dachte. Über die Verräterei des Kleinen aber war er wütend; er schwur, ihn mit eigener Hand aufzuhängen, wo er ihn finde. Meinem Bruder aber versprach er, sogleich zur Hilfe bereit zu sein, wenn er sich vorher von der Reise gestärkt haben würde. Mustapha blieb daher diese Nacht wieder in Orbasans Zelt; mit dem ersten Frührot aber brachen sie auf, und Orbasan nahm drei seiner tapfersten Männer, wohl beritten und bewaffnet, mit sich. Sie ritten stark zu und kamen nach zwei Tagen in die kleine Stadt, wo Mustapha die gerettete Fatme zurückgelassen hatte. Von da aus reisten sie mit dieser weiter bis zu dem kleinen Wald, von wo aus man das Schloß Thiulis in geringer Entfernung sehen konnte; dort lagerten sie sich, um die Nacht abzuwarten.
Sobald es dunkel wurde, schlichen sie sich, von Fatme geführt, an den Bach, wo die Wasserleitung anfing, und fanden diese bald. Dort ließen sie Fatme und einen Diener mit den Rossen zurück und schickten sich an, hinabzusteigen; ehe sie aber hinabstiegen, wiederholte ihnen Fatme noch einmal alles genau, nämlich: daß sie durch den Brunnen in den inneren Schloßhof kämen, dort seien rechts und links in der Ecke zwei Türme, in der sechsten Türe, vom Turme rechts gerechnet, befänden sich Fatme und Zoraide, bewacht von zwei schwarzen Sklaven. Mit Waffen und Brecheisen wohl versehen, stiegen Mustapha, Orbasan und zwei andere Männer hinab in die Wasserleitung; sie sanken zwar bis an den Gürtel ins Wasser; aber nichtsdestoweniger gingen sie rüstig vorwärts. Nach einer halben Stunde kamen sie an den Brunnen selbst und setzten sogleich ihre Brecheisen an. Die Mauer war dick und fest; aber den vereinten Kräften der vier Männer konnte sie nicht lange widerstehen; bald hatten sie eine Öffnung eingebrochen, groß genug, um bequem durchschlüpfen zu können. Orbasan schlüpfte zuerst durch und half den anderen nach. Als sie alle im Hof waren, betrachteten sie die Seite des Schlosses, die vor ihnen lag, um die beschriebene Türe zu erforschen. Aber sie waren nicht einig, welche es sei; denn als sie von dem rechten Turm zum linken zählten, fanden sie eine Türe, die zugemauert war, und wußten nun nicht, ob Fatme diese übersprungen oder mitgezählt habe. Aber Orbasan besann sich nicht lange. „Mein gutes Schwert wird mir jede Tür öffnen“, rief er aus, ging auf die sechste Türe zu, und die anderen folgten ihm.
Sie öffneten die Türe und fanden sechs schwarze Sklaven auf dem Boden liegend und schlafend; sie wollten schon wieder leise sich zurückziehen, weil sie sahen, daß sie die rechte Türe verfehlt hatten, als eine Gestalt in der Ecke sich aufrichtete und mit wohlbekannter Stimme um Hilfe rief. Es war der Kleine aus Orbasans Lager. Aber ehe noch die Schwarzen recht wußten, wie ihnen geschah, stürzte Orbasan auf den Kleinen zu, riß seinen Gürtel entzwei, verstopfte ihm den Mund und band ihm die Hände auf den Rücken; dann wandte er sich an die Sklaven, wovon schon einige von Mustapha und den zwei anderen halb gebunden waren, und half sie vollends überwältigen. Man setzte den Sklaven den Dolch auf die Brust und fragte sie, wo Nurmahal und Nürza wären, und sie gestanden, daß sie im Gemach nebenan seien. Mustapha stürzte in das Gemach und fand Fatme und Zoraide, die der Lärm erweckt hatte. Schnell rafften diese ihren Schmuck und ihre Kleider zusammen und folgten Mustapha; die beiden Räuber schlugen indes Orbasan vor, zu plündern, was man fände; doch dieser verbot es ihnen und sprach: „Man soll nicht von Orbasan sagen können, daß er nachts in die Häuser steige, um Gold zu stehlen!“ Mustapha und die Geretteten schlüpften schnell in die Wasserleitung, wohin ihnen Orbasan sogleich zu folgen versprach. Als jene in die Wasserleitung hinabgestiegen waren, nahmen Orbasan und einer der Räuber den Kleinen und führten ihn hinaus in den Hof; dort banden sie ihm eine seidene Schnur, die sie deshalb mitgenommen hatten, um den Hals und hingen ihn an der höchsten Spitze des Brunnens auf. Nachdem sie so den Verrat des Elenden bestraft hatten, stiegen sie selbst hinab in die Wasserleitung und folgten Mustapha. Mit Tränen dankten die beiden ihrem edelmütigen Retter Orbasan; doch dieser trieb sie eilends zur Flucht an, denn es war sehr wahrscheinlich, daß sie Thiuli-Kos nach allen Seiten verfolgen ließ. Mit tiefer Rührung trennten sich am anderen Tag Mustapha und seine Geretteten von Orbasan; wahrlich, sie werden ihn nie vergessen. Fatme aber, die befreite Sklavin, ging verkleidet nach Balsora, um sich dort in ihre Heimat einzuschiffen.
Nach einer kurzen und vergnügten Reise kamen die Meinigen in die Heimat. Meinen alten Vater tötete beinahe die Freude des Wiedersehens; den anderen Tag nach ihrer Ankunft veranstaltete er ein großes Fest, an welchem die ganze Stadt teilnahm. Vor einer großen Versammlung von Verwandten und Freunden mußte mein Bruder seine Geschichte erzählen, und einstimmig priesen sie ihn und den edlen Räuber.
Als aber mein Bruder geschlossen hatte, stand mein Vater auf und führte Zoraide ihm zu. „So löse ich denn“, sprach er mit feierlicher Stimme, „den Fluch von deinem Haupte; nimm diese hin als die Belohnung, die du dir durch deinen rastlosen Eifer erkämpft hast; nimm meinen väterlichen Segen, und möge es nie unserer Stadt an Männern fehlen, die an brüderlicher Liebe, an Klugheit und Eifer dir gleichen!“
Die Karawane hatte das Ende der Wüste erreicht, und fröhlich begrüßten die Reisenden die grünen Matten und die dichtbelaubten Bäume, deren lieblichen Anblick sie viele Tage entbehrt hatten. In einem schönen Tale lag eine Karawanserei, die sie sich zum Nachtlager wählten, und obgleich sie wenig Bequemlichkeit und Erfrischung darbot, so war doch die ganze Gesellschaft heiterer und zutraulicher als je; denn der Gedanke, den Gefahren und Beschwerlichkeiten, die eine Reise durch die Wüste mit sich bringt, entronnen zu sein, hatte alle Herzen geöffnet und die Gemüter zu Scherz und Kurzweil gestimmt. Muley, der junge lustige Kaufmann, tanzte einen komischen Tanz und sang Lieder dazu, die selbst dem ernsten Griechen Zaleukos ein Lächeln entlockten. Aber nicht genug, daß er seine Gefährten durch Tanz und Spiel erheitert hatte, er gab ihnen auch noch die Geschichte zum besten, die er ihnen versprochen hatte, und hub, als er von seinen Luftsprüngen sich erholt hatte, also zu erzählen an: Die Geschichte von dem kleinen Muck.


DIE GESCHICHTE VON DEM KLEINEN MUCK

In Nicea, meiner lieben Vaterstadt, wohnte ein Mann, den man den kleinen Muck hieß. Ich kann mir ihn, ob ich gleich damals noch sehr jung war, noch recht wohl denken, besonders weil ich einmal von meinem Vater wegen seiner halbtot geprügelt wurde. Der kleine Muck nämlich war schon ein alter Geselle, als ich ihn kannte; doch war er nur drei bis vier Schuh hoch, dabei hatte er eine sonderbare Gestalt, denn sein Leib, so klein und zierlich er war, mußte einen Kopf tragen, viel größer und dicker als der Kopf anderer Leute; er wohnte ganz allein in einem großen Haus und kochte sich sogar selbst, auch hätte man in der Stadt nicht gewußt, ob er lebe oder gestorben sei, denn er ging nur alle vier Wochen einmal aus, wenn nicht um die Mittagsstunde ein mächtiger Dampf aus dem Hause aufgestiegen wäre, doch sah man ihn oft abends auf seinem Dache auf und ab gehen, von der Straße aus glaubte man aber, nur sein großer Kopf allein laufe auf dem Dache umher. Ich und meine Kameraden waren böse Buben, die jedermann gerne neckten und belachten, daher war es uns allemal ein Festtag, wenn der kleine Muck ausging; wir versammelten uns an dem bestimmten Tage vor seinem Haus und warteten, bis er herauskam; wenn dann die Türe aufging und zuerst der große Kopf mit dem noch größeren Turban herausguckte, wenn das übrige Körperlein nachfolgte, angetan mit einem abgeschabten Mäntelein, weiten Beinkleidern und einem breiten Gürtel, an welchem ein langer Dolch hing, so lang, daß man nicht wußte, ob Muck an dem Dolch, oder der Dolch an Muck stak, wenn er so heraustrat, da ertönte die Luft von unserem Freudengeschrei, wir warfen unsere Mützen in die Höhe und tanzten wie toll um ihn her. Der kleine Muck aber grüßte uns mit ernsthaftem Kopfnicken und ging mit langsamen Schritten die Straße hinab. Wir Knaben liefen hinter ihm her und schrien immer: „Kleiner Muck, kleiner Muck!“ Auch hatten wir ein lustiges Verslein, das wir ihm zu Ehren hier und da sangen; es hieß:

„Kleiner Muck, kleiner Muck,
Wohnst in einem großen Haus,
Gehst nur all vier Wochen aus,
Bist ein braver, kleiner Zwerg,
Hast ein Köpflein wie ein Berg,
Schau dich einmal um und guck,
Lauf und fang uns, kleiner Muck!“

So hatten wir schon oft unsere Kurzweil getrieben, und zu meiner Schande muß ich es gestehen, ich trieb’s am ärgsten; denn ich zupfte ihn oft am Mäntelein, und einmal trat ich ihm auch von hinten auf die großen Pantoffeln, daß er hinfiel. Dies kam mir nun höchst lächerlich vor, aber das Lachen verging mir, als ich den kleinen Muck auf meines Vaters Haus zugehen sah. Er ging richtig hinein und blieb einige Zeit dort. Ich versteckte mich an der Haustüre und sah den Muck wieder herauskommen, von meinem Vater begleitet, der ihn ehrerbietig an der Hand hielt und an der Türe unter vielen Bücklingen sich von ihm verabschiedete. Mir war gar nicht wohl zumute; ich blieb daher lange in meinem Versteck; endlich aber trieb mich der Hunger, den ich ärger fürchtete als Schläge, heraus, und demütig und mit gesenktem Kopf trat ich vor meinen Vater. „Du hast, wie ich höre, den guten Muck beschimpft?“ sprach er in sehr ernstem Tone. „Ich will dir die Geschichte dieses Muck erzählen, und du wirst ihn gewiß nicht mehr auslachen; vor- und nachher aber bekommst du das Gewöhnliche.“ Das Gewöhnliche aber waren fünfundzwanzig Hiebe, die er nur allzu richtig aufzuzählen pflegte. Er nahm daher sein langes Pfeifenrohr, schraubte die Bernsteinmundspitze ab und bearbeitete mich ärger als je zuvor.
Als die Fünfundzwanzig voll waren, befahl er mir, aufzumerken, und erzählte mir von dem kleinen Muck:
Der Vater des kleinen Muck, der eigentlich Muckrah heißt, war ein angesehener, aber armer Mann hier in Nicea. Er lebte beinahe so einsiedlerisch wie jetzt sein Sohn. Diesen konnte er nicht wohl leiden, weil er sich seiner Zwerggestalt schämte, und ließ ihn daher auch in Unwissenheit aufwachsen. Der kleine Muck war noch in seinem sechzehnten Jahr ein lustiges Kind, und der Vater, ein ernster Mann, tadelte ihn immer, daß er, der schon längst die Kinderschuhe zertreten haben sollte, noch so dumm und läppisch sei.
Der Alte tat aber einmal einen bösen Fall, an welchem er auch starb und den kleinen Muck arm und unwissend zurückließ. Die harten Verwandten, denen der Verstorbene mehr schuldig war, als er bezahlen konnte, jagten den armen Kleinen aus dem Hause und rieten ihm, in die Welt hinauszugehen und sein Glück zu suchen. Der kleine Muck antwortete, er sei schon reisefertig, bat sich aber nur noch den Anzug seines Vaters aus, und dieser wurde ihm auch bewilligt. Sein Vater war ein großer, starker Mann gewesen, daher paßten die Kleider nicht. Muck aber wußte bald Rat; er schnitt ab, was zu lang war, und zog dann die Kleider an. Er schien aber vergessen zu haben, daß er auch in der Weite davon schneiden müsse, daher sein sonderbarer Aufzug, wie er noch heute zu sehen ist; der große Turban, der breite Gürtel, die weiten Hosen, das blaue Mäntelein, alles dies sind Erbstücke seines Vaters, die er seitdem getragen; den langen Damaszenerdolch seines Vaters aber steckte er in den Gürtel, ergriff ein Stöcklein und wanderte zum Tor hinaus.
Fröhlich wanderte er den ganzen Tag; denn er war ja ausgezogen, um sein Glück zu suchen; wenn er eine Scherbe auf der Erde im Sonnenschein glänzen sah, so steckte er sie gewiß zu sich, im Glauben, daß sie sich in den schönsten Diamanten verwandeln werde; sah er in der Ferne die Kuppel einer Moschee wie Feuer strahlen, sah er einen See wie einen Spiegel blinken, so eilte er voll Freude darauf zu; denn er dachte, in einem Zauberland angekommen zu sein. Aber ach! Jene Trugbilder verschwanden in der Nähe, und nur allzubald erinnerten ihn seine Müdigkeit und sein vor Hunger knurrender Magen, daß er noch im Lande der Sterblichen sich befinde. So war er zwei Tage gereist unter Hunger und Kummer und verzweifelte, sein Glück zu finden; die Früchte des Feldes waren seine einzige Nahrung, die harte Erde sein Nachtlager. Am Morgen des dritten Tages erblickte er von einer Anhöhe eine große Stadt.
Hell leuchtete der Halbmond auf ihren Zinnen, bunte Fahnen schimmerten auf den Dächern und schienen den kleinen Muck zu sich herzuwinken. Überrascht stand er stille und betrachtete Stadt und Gegend. „Ja, dort wird Klein-Muck sein Glück finden“, sprach er zu sich und machte trotz seiner Müdigkeit einen Luftsprung, „dort oder nirgends.“ Er raffte alle seine Kräfte zusammen und schritt auf die Stadt zu. Aber obgleich sie ganz nahe schien, konnte er sie doch erst gegen Mittag erreichen; denn seine kleinen Glieder versagten ihm beinahe gänzlich ihren Dienst, und er mußte sich oft in den Schatten einer Palme setzen, um auszuruhen. Endlich war er an dem Tor der Stadt angelangt. Er legte sein Mäntelein zurecht, band den Turban schöner um, zog den Gürtel noch breiter an und steckte den langen Dolch schiefer; dann wischte er den Staub von den Schuhen, ergriff sein Stöcklein und ging mutig zum Tor hinein.
Er hatte schon einige Straßen durchwandert; aber nirgends öffnete sich ihm die Türe, nirgends rief man, wie er sich vorgestellt hatte: „Kleiner Muck, komm herein und iß und trink und laß deine Füßlein ausruhen!“
Er schaute gerade auch wieder recht sehnsüchtig an einem großen, schönen Haus hinauf; da öffnete sich ein Fenster, eine alte Frau schaute heraus und rief mit singender Stimme:

„Herbei, herbei!
Gekocht ist der Brei,
Den Tisch ließ ich decken,
Drum laßt es euch schmecken;
Ihr Nachbarn herbei,
Gekocht ist der Brei.“

Die Türe des Hauses öffnete sich, und Muck sah viele Hunde und Katzen hineingehen. Er stand einige Augenblicke in Zweifel, ob er der Einladung folgen sollte; endlich aber faßte er sich ein Herz und ging in das Haus. Vor ihm her gingen ein paar junge Kätzlein, und er beschloß, ihnen zu folgen, weil sie vielleicht die Küche besser wüßten als er.
Als Muck die Treppe hinaufgestiegen war, begegnete er jener alten Frau, die zum Fenster herausgeschaut hatte. Sie sah ihn mürrisch an und fragte nach seinem Begehr. „Du hast ja jedermann zu deinem Brei eingeladen“, antwortete der kleine Muck, „und weil ich so gar hungrig bin, bin ich auch gekommen.“
Die Alte lachte und sprach: „Woher kommst du denn, wunderlicher Gesell? Die ganze Stadt weiß, daß ich für niemand koche als für meine lieben Katzen, und hier und da lade ich ihnen Gesellschaft aus der Nachbarschaft ein, wie du siehst.“
Der kleine Muck erzählte der alten Frau, wie es ihm nach seines Vaters Tod so hart ergangen sei, und bat sie, ihn heute mit ihren Katzen speisen zu lassen. Die Frau, welcher die treuherzige Erzählung des Kleinen wohl gefiel, erlaubte ihm, ihr Gast zu sein, und gab ihm reichlich zu essen und zu trinken. Als er gesättigt und gestärkt war, betrachtete ihn die Frau lange und sagte dann: „Kleiner Muck, bleibe bei mir in meinem Dienste! Du hast geringe Mühe und sollst gut gehalten sein.“
Der kleine Muck, dem der Katzenbrei geschmeckt hatte, willigte ein und wurde also der Bedienstete der Frau Ahavzi. Er hatte einen leichten, aber sonderbaren Dienst. Frau Ahavzi hatte nämlich zwei Kater und vier Katzen, diesen mußte der kleine Muck alle Morgen den Pelz kämmen und mit köstlichen Salben einreiben; wenn die Frau ausging, mußte er auf die Katzen Achtung geben, wenn sie aßen, mußte er ihnen die Schüsseln vorlegen, und nachts mußte er sie auf seidene Polster legen und sie mit samtenen Decken einhüllen. Auch waren noch einige kleine Hunde im Haus, die er bedienen mußte, doch wurden mit diesen nicht so viele Umstände gemacht wie mit den Katzen, welche Frau Ahavzi wie ihre eigenen Kinder hielt. Übrigens führte Muck ein so einsames Leben wie in seines Vaters Haus, denn außer der Frau sah er den ganzen Tag nur Hunde und Katzen. Eine Zeitlang ging es dem kleinen Muck ganz gut; er hatte immer zu essen und wenig zu arbeiten, und die alte Frau schien recht zufrieden mit ihm zu sein, aber nach und nach wurden die Katzen unartig, wenn die Alte ausgegangen war, sprangen sie wie besessen in den Zimmern umher, warfen alles durcheinander und zerbrachen manches schöne Geschirr, das ihnen im Weg stand. Wenn sie aber die Frau die Treppe heraufkommen hörten, verkrochen sie sich auf ihre Polster und wedelten ihr mit den Schwänzen entgegen, wie wenn nichts geschehen wäre. Die Frau Ahavzi geriet dann in Zorn, wenn sie ihre Zimmer so verwüstet sah, und schob alles auf Muck, er mochte seine Unschuld beteuern, wie er wollte, sie glaubte ihren Katzen, die so unschuldig aussahen, mehr als ihrem Diener.
Der kleine Muck war sehr traurig, daß er also auch hier sein Glück nicht gefunden hatte, und beschloß bei sich, den Dienst der Frau Ahavzi zu verlassen. Da er aber auf seiner ersten Reise erfahren hatte, wie schlecht man ohne Geld lebt, so beschloß er, den Lohn, den ihm seine Gebieterin immer versprochen, aber nie gegeben hatte, sich auf irgendeine Art zu verschaffen. Es befand sich in dem Hause der Frau Ahavzi ein Zimmer, das immer verschlossen war und dessen Inneres er nie gesehen hatte. Doch hatte er die Frau oft darin rumoren gehört, und er hätte oft für sein Leben gern gewußt, was sie dort versteckt habe. Als er nun an sein Reisegeld dachte, fiel ihm ein, daß dort die Schätze der Frau versteckt sein könnten. Aber immer war die Tür fest verschlossen, und er konnte daher den Schätzen nie beikommen.
Eines Morgens, als die Frau Ahavzi ausgegangen war, zupfte ihn eines der Hundlein, welches von der Frau immer sehr stiefmütterlich behandelt wurde, dessen Gunst er sich aber durch allerlei Liebesdienste in hohem Grade erworben hatte, an seinen weiten Beinkleidern und gebärdete sich dabei, wie wenn Muck ihm folgen sollte. Muck, welcher gerne mit den Hunden spielte, folgte ihm, und siehe da, das Hundlein führte ihn in die Schlafkammer der Frau Ahavzi vor eine kleine Türe, die er nie zuvor dort bemerkt hatte. Die Türe war halb offen. Das Hundlein ging hinein, und Muck folgte ihm, und wie freudig war er überrascht, als er sah, daß er sich in dem Gemach befand, das schon lange das Ziel seiner Wünsche war. Er spähte überall umher, ob er kein Geld finden könne, fand aber nichts. Nur alte Kleider und wunderlich geformte Geschirre standen umher. Eines dieser Geschirre zog seine besondere Aufmerksamkeit auf sich. Es war von Kristall, und schöne Figuren waren darauf ausgeschnitten. Er hob es auf und drehte es nach allen Seiten. Aber, o Schrecken! Er hatte nicht bemerkt, daß es einen Deckel hatte, der nur leicht darauf hingesetzt war. Der Deckel fiel herab und zerbrach in tausend Stücke.
Lange stand der kleine Muck vor Schrecken leblos. Jetzt war sein Schicksal entschieden, jetzt mußte er entfliehen, sonst schlug ihn die Alte tot. Sogleich war auch seine Reise beschlossen, und nur noch einmal wollte er sich umschauen, ob er nichts von den Habseligkeiten der Frau Ahavzi zu seinem Marsch brauchen könnte. Da fielen ihm ein Paar mächtig große Pantoffeln ins Auge; sie waren zwar nicht schön; aber seine eigenen konnten keine Reise mehr mitmachen; auch zogen ihn jene wegen ihrer Größe an; denn hatte er diese am Fuß, so mußten ihm hoffentlich alle Leute ansehen, daß er die Kinderschuhe vertreten habe. Er zog also schnell seine Töffelein aus und fuhr in die großen hinein. Ein Spazierstöcklein mit einem schön geschnittenen Löwenkopf schien ihm auch hier allzu müßig in der Ecke zu stehen; er nahm es also mit und eilte zum Zimmer hinaus. Schnell ging er jetzt auf seine Kammer, zog sein Mäntelein an, setzte den väterlichen Turban auf, steckte den Dolch in den Gürtel und lief, so schnell ihn seine Füße trugen, zum Haus und zur Stadt hinaus. Vor der Stadt lief er, aus Angst vor der Alten, immer weiter fort, bis er vor Müdigkeit beinahe nicht mehr konnte. So schnell war er in seinem Leben nicht gegangen; ja, es schien ihm, als könne er gar nicht aufhören zu rennen; denn eine unsichtbare Gewalt schien ihn fortzureißen. Endlich bemerkte er, daß es mit den Pantoffeln eine eigene Bewandtnis haben müsse; denn diese schossen immer fort und führten ihn mit sich. Er versuchte auf allerlei Weise stillzustehen; aber es wollte nicht gelingen; da rief er in der höchsten Not, wie man den Pferden zuruft, sich selbst zu: „Oh—oh, halt, oh!“ Da hielten die Pantoffeln, und Muck warf sich erschöpft auf die Erde nieder.
Die Pantoffeln freuten ihn ungemein. So hatte er sich denn doch durch seine Verdienste etwas erworben, das ihm in der Welt auf seinem Weg das Glück zu suchen, forthelfen konnte. Er schlief trotz seiner Freude vor Erschöpfung ein; denn das Körperlein des kleinen Muck, das einen so schweren Kopf zu tragen hatte, konnte nicht viel aushalten. Im Traum erschien ihm das Hundlein, welches ihm im Hause der Frau Ahavzi zu den Pantoffeln verholfen hatte, und sprach zu ihm: „Lieber Muck, du verstehst den Gebrauch der Pantoffeln noch nicht recht; wisse, wenn du dich in ihnen dreimal auf dem Absatz herumdrehst, so kannst du hinfliegen, wohin du nur willst, und mit dem Stöcklein kannst du Schätze finden, denn wo Gold vergraben ist, da wird es dreimal auf die Erde schlagen, bei Silber zweimal.“ So träumte der kleine Muck. Als er aber aufwachte, dachte er über den wunderbaren Traum nach und beschloß, alsbald einen Versuch zu machen. Er zog die Pantoffeln an, lupfte einen Fuß und begann sich auf dem Absatz umzudrehen. Wer es aber jemals versucht hat, in einem ungeheuer weiten Pantoffel dieses Kunststück dreimal hintereinander zu machen, der wird sich nicht wundern, wenn es dem kleinen Muck nicht gleich glückte, besonders wenn man bedenkt, daß ihn sein schwerer Kopf bald auf diese, bald auf jene Seite hinüberzog.
Der arme Kleine fiel einigemal tüchtig auf die Nase; doch ließ er sich nicht abschrecken, den Versuch zu wiederholen, und endlich glückte es. Wie ein Rad fuhr er auf seinem Absatz herum, wünschte sich in die nächste große Stadt, und—die Pantoffeln ruderten hinauf in die Lüfte, liefen mit Windeseile durch die Wolken, und ehe sich der kleine Muck noch besinnen konnte, wie ihm geschah, befand er sich schon auf einem großen Marktplatz, wo viele Buden aufgeschlagen waren und unzählige Menschen geschäftig hin und her liefen. Er ging unter den Leuten hin und her, hielt es aber für ratsamer, sich in eine einsamere Straße zu begeben; denn auf dem Markt trat ihm bald da einer auf die Pantoffeln, daß er beinahe umfiel, bald stieß er mit seinem weit hinausstehenden Dolch einen oder den anderen an, daß er mit Mühe den Schlägen entging.
Der kleine Muck bedachte nun ernstlich, was er wohl anfangen könnte, um sich ein Stück Geld zu verdienen; er hatte zwar ein Stäblein, das ihm verborgene Schätze anzeigte, aber wo sollte er gleich einen Platz finden, wo Gold oder Silber vergraben wäre? Auch hätte er sich zur Not für Geld sehen lassen können; aber dazu war er doch zu stolz. Endlich fiel ihm die Schnelligkeit seiner Füße ein, „vielleicht“, dachte er, „können mir meine Pantoffeln Unterhalt gewähren“, und er beschloß, sich als Schnelläufer zu verdingen. Da er aber hoffen durfte, daß der König dieser Stadt solche Dienste am besten bezahle, so erfragte er den Palast. Unter dem Tor des Palastes stand eine Wache, die ihn fragte, was er hier zu suchen habe. Auf seine Antwort, daß er einen Dienst suche, wies man ihn zum Aufseher der Sklaven. Diesem trug er sein Anliegen vor und bat ihn, ihm einen Dienst unter den königlichen Boten zu besorgen. Der Aufseher maß ihn mit seinen Augen von Kopf bis zu den Füßen und sprach: „Wie, mit deinen Füßlein, die kaum so lang als eine Spanne sind, willst du königlicher Schnelläufer werden? Hebe dich weg, ich bin nicht dazu da, mit jedem Narren Kurzweil zu machen.“ Der kleine Muck versicherte ihm aber, daß es ihm vollkommen ernst sei mit seinem Antrag und daß er es mit dem Schnellsten auf eine Wette ankommen lassen wollte. Dem Aufseher kam die Sache gar lächerlich vor; er befahl ihm, sich bis auf den Abend zu einem Wettlauf bereitzuhalten, führte ihn in die Küche und sorgte dafür, daß ihm gehörig Speis’ und Trank gereicht wurde; er selbst aber begab sich zum König und erzählte ihm vom kleinen Muck und seinem Anerbieten. Der König war ein lustiger Herr, daher gefiel es ihm wohl, daß der Aufseher der Sklaven den kleinen Menschen zu einem Spaß behalten habe, er befahl ihm, auf einer großen Wiese hinter dem Schloß Anstalten zu treffen, daß das Wettlaufen mit Bequemlichkeit von seinem ganzen Hofstaat könnte gesehen werden, und empfahl ihm nochmals, große Sorgfalt für den Zwerg zu haben. Der König erzählte seinen Prinzen und Prinzessinnen, was sie diesen Abend für ein Schauspiel haben würden, diese erzählten es wieder ihren Dienern, und als der Abend herankam, war man in gespannter Erwartung, und alles, was Füße hatte, strömte hinaus auf die Wiese, wo Gerüste aufgeschlagen waren, um den großsprecherischen Zwerg laufen zu sehen.
Als der König und seine Söhne und Töchter auf dem Gerüst Platz genommen hatten, trat der kleine Muck heraus auf die Wiese und machte vor den hohen Herrschaften eine überaus zierliche Verbeugung. Ein allgemeines Freudengeschrei ertönte, als man des Kleinen ansichtig wurde; eine solche Figur hatte man dort noch nie gesehen. Das Körperlein mit dem mächtigen Kopf, das Mäntelein und die weiten Beinkleider, der lange Dolch in dem breiten Gürtel, die kleinen Füßlein in den weiten Pantoffeln—nein! Es war zu drollig anzusehen, als daß man nicht hätte laut lachen sollen. Der kleine Muck ließ sich aber durch das Gelächter nicht irremachen. Er stellte sich stolz, auf sein Stöcklein gestützt, hin und erwartete seinen Gegner. Der Aufseher der Sklaven hatte nach Mucks eigenem Wunsche den besten Läufer ausgesucht. Dieser trat nun heraus, stellte sich neben den Kleinen, und beide harrten auf das Zeichen. Da winkte Prinzessin Amarza, wie es ausgemacht war, mit ihrem Schleier, und wie zwei Pfeile, auf dasselbe Ziel abgeschossen, flogen die beiden Wettläufer über die Wiese hin.
Von Anfang hatte Mucks Gegner einen bedeutenden Vorsprung, aber dieser jagte ihm auf seinem Pantoffelfuhrwerk nach, holte ihn ein, überfing ihn und stand längst am Ziele, als jener noch, nach Luft schnappend, daherlief. Verwunderung und Staunen fesselten einige Augenblicke die Zuschauer, als aber der König zuerst in die Hände klatschte, da jauchzte die Menge, und alle riefen: „Hoch lebe der kleine Muck, der Sieger im Wettlauf!“
Man hatte indes den kleinen Muck herbeigebracht; er warf sich vor dem König nieder und sprach: „Großmächtigster König, ich habe dir hier nur eine kleine Probe meiner Kunst gegeben; wolle nur gestatten, daß man mir eine Stelle unter deinen Läufern gebe!“
Der König aber antwortete ihm: „Nein, du sollst mein Leibläufer und immer um meine Person sein, lieber Muck, jährlich sollst du hundert Goldstücke erhalten als Lohn, und an der Tafel meiner ersten Diener sollst du speisen.“
So glaubte denn Muck, endlich das Glück gefunden zu haben, das er so lange suchte, und war fröhlich und wohlgemut in seinem Herzen. Auch erfreute er sich der besonderen Gnade des Königs, denn dieser gebrauchte ihn zu seinen schnellsten und geheimsten Sendungen, die er dann mit der größten Genauigkeit und mit unbegreiflicher Schnelle besorgte.
Aber die übrigen Diener des Königs waren ihm gar nicht zugetan, weil sie sich ungern durch einen Zwerg, der nichts verstand, als schnell zu laufen, in der Gunst ihres Herrn zurückgesetzt sahen. Sie veranstalteten daher manche Verschwörung gegen ihn, um ihn zu stürzen; aber alle schlugen fehl an dem großen Zutrauen, das der König in seinen geheimen Oberleibläufer (denn zu dieser Würde hatte er es in so kurzer Zeit gebracht) setzte.
Muck, dem diese Bewegungen gegen ihn nicht entgingen, sann nicht auf Rache, dazu hatte er ein zu gutes Herz, nein, auf Mittel dachte er, sich bei seinen Feinden notwendig und beliebt zu machen. Da fiel ihm sein Stäblein, das er in seinem Glück außer acht gelassen hatte, ein; wenn er Schätze finde, dachte er, würden ihm die Herren schon geneigter werden. Er hatte schon oft gehört, daß der Vater des jetzigen Königs viele seiner Schätze vergraben habe, als der Feind sein Land überfallen; man sagte auch, er sei darüber gestorben, ohne daß er sein Geheimnis habe seinem Sohn mitteilen können. Von nun an nahm Muck immer sein Stöcklein mit, in der Hoffnung, einmal an einem Ort vorüberzugehen, wo das Geld des alten Königs vergraben sei. Eines Abends führte ihn der Zufall in einen entlegenen Teil des Schloßgartens, den er wenig besuchte, und plötzlich fühlte er das Stöcklein in seiner Hand zucken, und dreimal schlug es gegen den Boden. Nun wußte er schon, was dies zu bedeuten hatte. Er zog daher seinen Dolch heraus, machte Zeichen in die umstellenden Bäume und schlich sich wieder in das Schloß; dort verschaffte er sich einen Spaten und wartete die Nacht zu seinem Unternehmen ab.
Das Schatzgraben selbst machte übrigens dem kleinen Muck mehr zu schaffen, als er geglaubt hatte.
Seine Arme waren gar zu schwach, sein Spaten aber groß und schwer; und er mochte wohl schon zwei Stunden gearbeitet haben, ehe er ein paar Fuß tief gegraben hatte. Endlich stieß er auf etwas Hartes, das wie Eisen klang. Er grub jetzt emsiger, und bald hatte er einen großen eisernen Deckel zutage gefördert; er stieg selbst in die Grube hinab, um nachzuspähen, was wohl der Deckel könnte bedeckt haben, und fand richtig einen großen Topf, mit Goldstücken angefüllt. Aber seine schwachen Kräfte reichten nicht hin, den Topf zu heben, daher steckte er in seine Beinkleider und seinen Gürtel, so viel er zu tragen vermochte, und auch sein Mäntelein füllte er damit, bedeckte das übrige wieder sorgfältig und lud es auf den Rücken. Aber wahrlich, wenn er die Pantoffeln nicht an den Füßen gehabt hätte, er wäre nicht vom Fleck gekommen, so zog ihn die Last des Goldes nieder. Doch unbemerkt kam er auf sein Zimmer und verwahrte dort sein Gold unter den Polstern seines Sofas.
Als der kleine Muck sich im Besitz so vielen Goldes sah, glaubte er, das Blatt werde sich jetzt wenden und er werde sich unter seinen Feinden am Hofe viele Gönner und warme Anhänger erwerben. Aber schon daran konnte man erkennen, daß der gute Muck keine gar sorgfältige Erziehung genossen haben mußte, sonst hätte er sich wohl nicht einbilden können, durch Gold wahre Freunde zu gewinnen. Ach, daß er damals seine Pantoffeln geschmiert und sich mit seinem Mäntelein voll Gold aus dem Staub gemacht hätte!
Das Gold, das der kleine Muck von jetzt an mit vollen Händen austeilte, erweckte den Neid der übrigen Hofbediensteten. Der Küchenmeister Ahuli sagte: „Er ist ein Falschmünzer.“
Der Sklavenaufseher Achmet sagte: „Er hat’s dem König abgeschwatzt.“
Archaz, der Schatzmeister, aber, sein ärgster Feind, der selbst hier und da einen Griff in des Königs Kasse tun mochte, sagte geradezu: „Er hat’s gestohlen.“
Um nun ihrer Sache gewiß zu sein, verabredeten sie sich, und der Obermundschenk Korchuz stellte sich eines Tages recht traurig und niedergeschlagen vor die Augen des Königs. Er machte seine traurigen Gebärden so auffallend, daß ihn der König fragte, was ihm fehle.
„Ah“, antwortete er, „ich bin traurig, daß ich die Gnade meines Herrn verloren habe.“
„Was fabelst du, Freund Korchuz?“ entgegnete ihm der König. „Seit wann hätte ich die Sonne meiner Gnade nicht über dich leuchten lassen?“ Der Obermundschenk antwortete ihm, daß er ja den geheimen Oberleibläufer mit Gold belade, seinen armen, treuen Dienern aber nichts gebe.
Der König war sehr erstaunt über diese Nachricht, ließ sich die Goldausteilungen des kleinen Muck erzählen, und die Verschworenen brachten ihm leicht den Verdacht bei, daß Muck auf irgendeine Art das Geld aus der Schatzkammer gestohlen habe. Sehr lieb war diese Wendung der Sache dem Schatzmeister, der ohnehin nicht gerne Rechnung ablegte. Der König gab daher den Befehl, heimlich auf alle Schritte des kleinen Muck achtzugeben, um ihn womöglich auf der Tat zu ertappen. Als nun in der Nacht, die auf diesen Unglückstag folgte, der kleine Muck, da er durch seine Freigebigkeit seine Kasse sehr erschöpft sah, den Spaten nahm und in den Schloßgarten schlich, um dort von seinem geheimen Schatze neuen Vorrat zu holen, folgten ihm von weitem die Wachen, von dem Küchenmeister Ahuli und Archaz, dem Schatzmeister, angeführt, und in dem Augenblick, da er das Gold aus dem Topf in sein Mäntelein legen wollte, fielen sie über ihn her, banden ihn und führten ihn sogleich vor den König. Dieser, den ohnehin die Unterbrechung seines Schlafes mürrisch gemacht hatte, empfing seinen armen Oberleibläufer sehr ungnädig und stellte sogleich das Verhör über ihn an. Man hatte den Topf vollends aus der Erde gegraben und mit dem Spaten und mit dem Mäntelein voll Gold vor die Füße des Königs gesetzt. Der Schatzmeister sagte aus, daß er mit seinen Wachen den Muck überrascht habe, wie er diesen Topf mit Gold gerade in die Erde gegraben habe.
Der König befragte hierauf den Angeklagten, ob es wahr sei und woher er das Gold, das er vergraben, bekommen habe.
Der kleine Muck, im Gefühl seiner Unschuld, sagte aus, daß er diesen Topf im Garten entdeckt habe, daß er ihn habe nicht ein-, sondern ausgraben wollen.
Alle Anwesenden lachten laut über diese Entschuldigung, der König aber, aufs höchste erzürnt über die vermeintliche Frechheit des Kleinen, rief aus: „Wie, Elender! Du willst deinen König so dumm und schändlich belügen, nachdem du ihn bestohlen hast? Schatzmeister Archaz! Ich fordere dich auf, zu sagen, ob du diese Summe Goldes für die nämliche erkennst, die in meinem Schatze fehlt.“
Der Schatzmeister aber antwortete, er sei seiner Sache ganz gewiß, so viel und noch mehr fehle seit einiger Zeit von dem königlichen Schatz, und er könne einen Eid darauf ablegen, daß dies das Gestohlene sei.
Da befahl der König, den kleinen Muck in enge Ketten zu legen und in den Turm zu führen; dem Schatzmeister aber übergab er das Gold, um es wieder in den Schatz zu tragen. Vergnügt über den glücklichen Ausgang der Sache, zog dieser ab und zählte zu Haus die blinkenden Goldstücke; aber das hat dieser schlechte Mann niemals angezeigt, daß unten in dem Topf ein Zettel lag, der sagte: „Der Feind hat mein Land überschwemmt, daher verberge ich hier einen Teil meiner Schätze; wer es auch finden mag, den treffe der Fluch seines Königs, wenn er es nicht sogleich meinem Sohne ausliefert! König Sadi.“
Der kleine Muck stellte in seinem Kerker traurige Betrachtungen an; er wußte, daß auf Diebstahl an königlichen Sachen der Tod gesetzt war, und doch mochte er das Geheimnis mit dem Stäbchen dem König nicht verraten, weil er mit Recht fürchtete, dieses und seiner Pantoffeln beraubt zu werden. Seine Pantoffeln konnten ihm leider auch keine Hilfe bringen; denn da er in engen Ketten an die Mauer geschlossen war, konnte er, so sehr er sich quälte, sich nicht auf dem Absatz umdrehen. Als ihm aber am anderen Tage sein Tod angekündigt wurde, da gedachte er doch, es sei besser, ohne das Zauberstäbchen zu leben als mit ihm zu sterben, ließ den König um geheimes Gehör bitten und entdeckte ihm das Geheimnis. Der König maß von Anfang an seinem Geständnis keinen Glauben bei; aber der kleine Muck versprach eine Probe, wenn ihm der König zugestünde, daß er nicht getötet werden solle.
Der König gab ihm sein Wort darauf und ließ, von Muck ungesehen, einiges Gold in die Erde graben und befahl diesem, mit seinem Stäbchen zu suchen. In wenigen Augenblicken hatte er es gefunden; denn das Stäbchen schlug deutlich dreimal auf die Erde. Da merkte der König, daß ihn sein Schatzmeister betrogen hatte, und sandte ihm, wie es im Morgenland gebräuchlich ist, eine seidene Schnur, damit er sich selbst erdroßle. Zum kleinen Muck aber sprach er: „Ich habe dir zwar dein Leben versprochen; aber es scheint mir, als ob du nicht allein dieses Geheimnis mit dem Stäbchen besitzest; darum bleibst du in ewiger Gefangenschaft, wenn du nicht gestehst, was für eine Bewandtnis es mit deinem Schnellaufen hat.“ Der kleine Muck, den die einzige Nacht im Turm alle Lust zu längerer Gefangenschaft benommen hatte, bekannte, daß seine ganze Kunst in den Pantoffeln liege, doch lehrte er den König nicht das Geheimnis von dem dreimaligen Umdrehen auf dem Absatz. Der König schlüpfte selbst in die Pantoffeln, um die Probe zu machen, und jagte wie unsinnig im Garten umher; oft wollte er anhalten; aber er wußte nicht, wie man die Pantoffeln zum Stehen brachte, und der kleine Muck, der diese kleine Rache sich nicht versagen konnte, ließ ihn laufen, bis er ohnmächtig niederfiel.
Als der König wieder zur Besinnung zurückgekehrt war, war er schrecklich aufgebracht über den kleinen Muck, der ihn so ganz außer Atem hatte laufen lassen. „Ich habe dir mein Wort gegeben, dir Freiheit und Leben zu schenken; aber innerhalb zwölf Stunden mußt du mein Land verlassen, sonst lasse ich dich aufknöpfen!“ Die Pantoffeln und das Stäbchen aber ließ er in seine Schatzkammer legen.
So arm als je wanderte der kleine Muck zum Land hinaus, seine Torheit verwünschend, die ihm vorgespiegelt hatte, er könne eine bedeutende Rolle am Hofe spielen. Das Land, aus dem er gejagt wurde, war zum Glück nicht groß, daher war er schon nach acht Stunden auf der Grenze, obgleich ihn das Gehen, da er an seine lieben Pantoffeln gewöhnt war, sehr sauer ankam.
Als er über der Grenze war, verließ er die gewöhnliche Straße, um die dichteste Einöde der Wälder aufzusuchen und dort nur sich zu leben; denn er war allen Menschen gram. In einem dichten Walde traf er auf einen Platz, der ihm zu dem Entschluß, den er gefaßt hatte, ganz tauglich schien. Ein klarer Bach, von großen, schattigen Feigenbäumen umgeben, ein weicher Rasen luden ihn ein; hier warf er sich nieder mit dem Entschluß, keine Speise mehr zu sich zu nehmen, sondern hier den Tod zu erwarten. Über traurigen Todesbetrachtungen schlief er ein; als er aber wieder aufwachte und der Hunger ihn zu quälen anfing, bedachte er doch, daß der Hungertod eine gefährliche Sache sei, und sah sich um, ob er nirgends etwas zu essen bekommen könnte.
Köstliche reife Feigen hingen an dem Baume, unter welchem er geschlafen hatte; er stieg hinauf, um sich einige zu pflücken, ließ es sich trefflich schmecken und ging dann hinunter an den Bach, um seinen Durst zu löschen. Aber wie groß war sein Schrecken, als ihm das Wasser seinen Kopf mit zwei gewaltigen Ohren und einer dicken, langen Nase geschmückt zeigte! Bestürzt griff er mit den Händen nach den Ohren, und wirklich, sie waren über eine halbe Elle lang.
„Ich verdiene Eselsohren!“ rief er aus; „denn ich habe mein Glück wie ein Esel mit Füßen getreten.“ Er wanderte unter den Bäumen umher, und als er wieder Hunger fühlte, mußte er noch einmal zu den Feigen seine Zuflucht nehmen; denn sonst fand er nichts Eßbares an den Bäumen. Als ihm über der zweiten Portion Feigen einfiel, ob wohl seine Ohren nicht unter seinem großen Turban Platz hätten, damit er doch nicht gar zu lächerlich aussehe, fühlte er, daß seine Ohren verschwunden waren. Er lief gleich an den Bach zurück, um sich davon zu überzeugen, und wirklich, es war so, seine Ohren hatten ihre vorige Gestalt, seine lange, unförmliche Nase war nicht mehr. Jetzt merkte er aber, wie dies gekommen war; von dem ersten Feigenbaum hatte er die lange Nase und Ohren bekommen, der zweite hatte ihn geheilt; freudig erkannte er, daß sein gütiges Geschick ihm noch einmal die Mittel in die Hand gebe, glücklich zu sein. Er pflückte daher von jedem Baum so viel, wie er tragen konnte, und ging in das Land zurück, das er vor kurzem verlassen hatte. Dort machte er sich in dem ersten Städtchen durch andere Kleider ganz unkenntlich und ging dann weiter auf die Stadt zu, die jener König bewohnte, und kam auch bald dort an.
Es war gerade zu einer Jahreszeit, wo reife Früchte noch ziemlich selten waren; der kleine Muck setzte sich daher unter das Tor des Palastes; denn ihm war von früherer Zeit her wohl bekannt, daß hier solche Seltenheiten von dem Küchenmeister für die königliche Tafel eingekauft wurden. Muck hatte noch nicht lange gesessen, als er den Küchenmeister über den Hof herüberschreiten sah. Er musterte die Waren der Verkäufer, die sich am Tor des Palastes eingefunden hatten; endlich fiel sein Blick auch auf Mucks Körbchen. „Ah, ein seltener Bissen“, sagte er, „der Ihro Majestät gewiß behagen wird. Was willst du für den ganzen Korb?“ Der kleine Muck bestimmte einen mäßigen Preis, und sie waren bald des Handels einig. Der Küchenmeister übergab den Korb einem Sklaven und ging weiter; der kleine Muck aber macht sich einstweilen aus dem Staub, weil er befürchtete, wenn sich das Unglück an den Köpfen des Hofes zeigte, möchte man ihn als Verkäufer aufsuchen und bestrafen.
Der König war über Tisch sehr heiter gestimmt und sagte seinem Küchenmeister einmal über das andere Lobsprüche wegen seiner guten Küche und der Sorgfalt, mit der er immer das Seltenste für ihn aussuche; der Küchenmeister aber, welcher wohl wußte, welchen Leckerbissen er noch im Hintergrund habe, schmunzelte gar freundlich und ließ nur einzelne Worte fallen, als: „Es ist noch nicht aller Tage Abend“, oder „Ende gut, alles gut“, so daß die Prinzessinnen sehr neugierig wurden, was er wohl noch bringen werde. Als er aber die schönen, einladenden Feigen aufsetzen ließ, da entfloh ein allgemeines Ah! dem Munde der Anwesenden.
„Wie reif, wie appetitlich!“ rief der König. „Küchenmeister, du bist ein ganzer Kerl und verdienst unsere ganz besondere Gnade!“ Also sprechend, teilte der König, der mit solchen Leckerbissen sehr sparsam zu sein pflegte, mit eigener Hand die Feigen an seiner Tafel aus. Jeder Prinz und jede Prinzessin bekam zwei, die Hofdamen und die Wesire und Agas eine, die übrigen stellte er vor sich hin und begann mit großem Behagen sie zu verschlingen.
„Aber, lieber Gott, wie siehst du so wunderlich aus, Vater?“ rief auf einmal die Prinzessin Amarza. Alle sahen den König erstaunt an; ungeheure Ohren hingen ihm am Kopf, eine lange Nase zog sich über sein Kinn herunter; auch sich selbst betrachteten sie untereinander mit Staunen und Schrecken; alle waren mehr oder minder mit dem sonderbaren Kopfputz geschmeckt.
Man denke sich den Schrecken des Hofes! Man schickte sogleich nach allen Ärzten der Stadt; sie kamen haufenweise, verordneten Pillen und Mixturen; aber die Ohren und die Nasen blieben. Man operierte einen der Prinzen; aber die Ohren wuchsen nach.
Muck hatte die ganze Geschichte in seinem Versteck, wohin er sich zurückgezogen hatte, gehört und erkannte, daß es jetzt Zeit sei zu handeln. Er hatte sich schon vorher von dem aus den Feigen gelösten Geld einen Anzug verschafft, der ihn als Gelehrten darstellen konnte; ein langer Bart aus Ziegenhaaren vollendete die Täuschung. Mit einem Säckchen voll Feigen wanderte er in den Palast des Königs und bot als fremder Arzt seine Hilfe an. Man war von Anfang sehr ungläubig; als aber der kleine Muck eine Feige einem der Prinzen zu essen gab und Ohren und Nase dadurch in den alten Zustand zurückbrachte, da wollte alles von dem fremden Arzte geheilt sein. Aber der König nahm ihn schweigend bei der Hand und führte ihn in sein Gemach; dort schloß er eine Türe auf, die in die Schatzkammer führte, und winkte Muck, ihm zu folgen. „Hier sind meine Schätze“, sprach der König, „wähle dir, was es auch sei, es soll dir gewährt werden, wenn du mich von diesem schmachvollen Übel befreist.“
Das war süße Musik in des kleinen Muck Ohren; er hatte gleich beim Eintritt seine Pantoffeln auf dem Boden stehen sehen, gleich daneben lag auch sein Stäbchen. Er ging nun umher in dem Saal, wie wenn er die Schätze des Königs bewundern wollte; kaum aber war er an seine Pantoffeln gekommen, so schlüpfte er eilends hinein, ergriff sein Stäbchen, riß seinen falschen Bart herab und zeigte dem erstaunten König das wohlbekannte Gesicht seines verstoßenen Muck. „Treuloser König“, sprach er, „der du treue Dienste mit Undank lohnst, nimm als wohlverdiente Strafe die Mißgestalt, die du trägst. Die Ohren laß ich dir zurück, damit sie dich täglich erinnern an den kleinen Muck.“ Als er so gesprochen hatte, drehte er sich schnell auf dem Absatz herum, wünschte sich weit hinweg, und ehe noch der König um Hilfe rufen konnte, war der kleine Muck entflohen. Seitdem lebt der kleine Muck hier in großem Wohlstand, aber einsam; denn er verachtet die Menschen. Er ist durch Erfahrung ein weiser Mann geworden, welcher, wenn auch sein Äußeres etwas Auffallendes haben mag, deine Bewunderung mehr als deinen Spott verdient.
„So erzählte mir mein Vater; ich bezeugte ihm meine Reue über mein rohes Betragen gegen den guten kleinen Mann, und mein Vater schenkte mir die andere Hälfte der Strafe, die er mir zugedacht hatte. Ich erzählte meinen Kameraden die wunderbaren Schicksale des Kleinen, und wir gewannen ihn so lieb, daß ihn keiner mehr schimpfte. Im Gegenteil, wir ehrten ihn, solange er lebte, und haben uns vor ihm immer so tief wie vor Kadi und Mufti gebückt.“
Die Reisenden beschlossen, einen Rasttag in dieser Karawanserei zu machen, um sich und die Tiere zur weiteren Reise zu stärken. Die gestrige Fröhlichkeit ging auch auf diesen Tag über, und sie ergötzten sich in allerlei Spielen. Nach dem Essen aber riefen sie dem fünften Kaufmann, Ali Sizah, zu, auch seine Schuldigkeit gleich den übrigen zu tun und eine Geschichte zu erzählen. Er antwortete, sein Leben sei zu arm an auffallenden Begebenheiten, als daß er ihnen etwas davon mitteilen möchte, daher wolle er ihnen etwas anderes erzählen, nämlich: Das Märchen vom falschen Prinzen.


DAS MÄRCHEN VOM FALSCHEN PRINZEN

Es war einmal ein ehrsamer Schneidergeselle, namens Labakan, der bei einem geschickten Meister in Alessandria sein Handwerk lernte. Man konnte nicht sagen, daß Labakan ungeschickt mit der Nadel war, im Gegenteil, er konnte recht feine Arbeit machen. Auch tat man ihm unrecht, wenn man ihn geradezu faul schalt; aber ganz richtig war es doch nicht mit dem Gesellen, denn er konnte oft stundenweis in einem fort nähen, daß ihm die Nadel in der Hand glühend ward und der Faden rauchte, da gab es ihm dann ein Stück wie keinem anderen; ein andermal aber, und dies geschah leider öfters, saß er in tiefen Gedanken, sah mit starren Augen vor sich hin und hatte dabei in Gesicht und Wesen etwas so Eigenes, daß sein Meister und die übrigen Gesellen von diesem Zustand nie anders sprachen als: „Labakan hat wieder sein vornehmes Gesicht.“
Am Freitag aber, wenn andere Leute vom Gebet ruhig nach Haus an ihre Arbeit gingen, trat Labakan in einem schönen Kleid, das er sich mit vieler Mühe zusammengespart hatte, aus der Moschee, ging langsam und stolzen Schrittes durch die Plätze und Straßen der Stadt, und wenn ihm einer seiner Kameraden ein „Friede sei mit dir“, oder „Wie geht es, Freund Labakan?“ bot, so winkte er gnädig mit der Hand oder nickte, wenn es hoch kam, vornehm mit dem Kopf. Wenn dann sein Meister im Spaß zu ihm sagte: „An dir ist ein Prinz verlorengegangen, Labakan“, so freute er sich darüber und antwortete: „Habt Ihr das auch bemerkt?“ oder: „Ich habe es schon lange gedacht!“
So trieb es der ehrsame Schneidergeselle Labakan schon eine geraume Zeit, sein Meister aber duldete seine Narrheit, weil er sonst ein guter Mensch und geschickter Arbeiter war. Aber eines Tages schickte Selim, der Bruder des Sultans, der gerade durch Alessandria reiste, ein Festkleid zu dem Meister, um einiges daran verändern zu lassen, und der Meister gab es Labakan, weil dieser die feinste Arbeit machte. Als abends der Meister und die Gesellen sich hinwegbegeben hatten, um nach des Tages Last sich zu erholen, trieb eine unwiderstehliche Sehnsucht Labakan wieder in die Werkstatt zurück, wo das Kleid des kaiserlichen Bruders hing. Er stand lange sinnend davor, bald den Glanz der Stickerei, bald die schillernden Farben des Samts und der Seide an dem Kleide bewundernd. Er konnte nicht anders, er mußte es anziehen, und siehe da, es paßte ihm so trefflich, wie wenn es für ihn wäre gemacht worden. „Bin ich nicht so gut ein Prinz als einer?“ fragte er sich, indem er im Zimmer auf und ab schritt. „Hat nicht der Meister selbst schon gesagt, daß ich zum Prinzen geboren sei?“ Mit den Kleidern schien der Geselle eine ganz königliche Gesinnung angezogen zu haben; er konnte sich nicht anders denken, als er sei ein unbekannter Königssohn, und als solcher beschloß er, in die Welt zu reisen und einen Ort zu verlassen, wo die Leute bisher so töricht gewesen waren, unter der Hülle seines niederen Standes nicht seine angebotene Würde zu erkennen. Das prachtvolle Kleid schien ihm von einer gütigen Fee geschickt, er hütete sich daher wohl, ein so teures Geschenk zu verschmähen, steckte seine geringe Barschaft zu sich und wanderte, begünstigt von dem Dunkel der Nacht, aus Alessandrias Toren.
Der neue Prinz erregte überall auf seiner Wanderschaft Verwunderung, denn das prachtvolle Kleid und sein ernstes, majestätisches Wesen wollten gar nicht passen für einen Fußgänger. Wenn man ihn darüber befragte, pflegte er mit geheimnisvoller Miene zu antworten, daß das seine eigenen Ursachen habe. Als er aber merkte, daß er sich durch seine Fußwanderungen lächerlich machte, kaufte er um geringen Preis ein altes Roß, welches sehr für ihn paßte, da es ihn mit seiner gesetzten Ruhe und Sanftmut nie in die Verlegenheit brachte, sich als geschickter Reiter zeigen zu müssen, was gar nicht seine Sache war.
Eines Tages, als er Schritt vor Schritt auf seinem Murva, so hatte er sein Roß genannt, seine Straße zog, schloß sich ein Reiter an ihn an und bat ihn, in seiner Gesellschaft reiten zu dürfen, weil ihm der Weg viel kürzer werde im Gespräch mit einem anderen. Der Reiter war ein fröhlicher, junger Mann, schön und angenehm im Umgang. Er hatte mit Labakan bald ein Gespräch angeknüpft über Woher und Wohin, und es traf sich, daß auch er, wie der Schneidergeselle, ohne Plan in die Welt hinauszog. Er sagte, er heiße Omar, sei der Neffe Elfi Beys, des unglücklichen Bassas von Kairo, und reise nun umher, um einen Auftrag, den ihm sein Oheim auf dem Sterbebette erteilt habe, auszurichten. Labakan ließ sich nicht so offenherzig über seine Verhältnisse aus, er gab ihm zu verstehen, daß er von hoher Abkunft sei und zu seinem Vergnügen reise.
Die beiden jungen Herren fanden Gefallen aneinander und zogen fürder. Am zweiten Tage ihrer gemeinschaftlichen Reise fragte Labakan seinen Gefährten Omar nach den Aufträgen, die er zu besorgen habe, und erfuhr zu seinem Erstaunen folgendes: Elfi Bey, der Bassa von Kairo, hatte den Omar seit seiner frühesten Kindheit erzogen, und dieser hatte seine Eltern nie gekannt. Als nun Elfi Bey von seinen Feinden überfallen worden war und nach drei unglücklichen Schlachten, tödlich verwundet, fliehen mußte, entdeckte er seinem Zögling, daß er nicht sein Neffe sei, sondern der Sohn eines mächtigen Herrschers, welcher aus Furcht vor den Prophezeiungen seiner Sterndeuter den jungen Prinzen von seinem Hofe entfernt habe, mit dem Schwur, ihn erst an seinem zweiundzwanzigsten Geburtstage wiedersehen zu wollen. Elfi Bey habe ihm den Namen seines Vaters nicht genannt, sondern ihm nur aufs bestimmteste aufgetragen, am fünften Tage des kommenden Monats Ramadan, an welchem Tage er zweiundzwanzig Jahre alt werde, sich an der berühmten Säule El-Serujah, vier Tagreisen östlich von Alessandria, einzufinden; dort soll er den Männern, die an der Säule stehen würden, einen Dolch, den er ihm gab, überreichen mit den Worten: „Hier bin ich, den ihr suchet“; wenn sie antworteten: „Gelobt sei der Prophet, der dich erhielt!“, so solle er ihnen folgen, sie würden ihn zu seinem Vater führen.
Der Schneidergeselle Labakan war sehr erstaunt über diese Mitteilung, er betrachtete von jetzt an den Prinzen Omar mit neidischen Augen, erzürnt darüber, daß das Schicksal jenem, obgleich er schon für den Neffen eines mächtigen Bassa galt, noch die Würde eines Fürstensohnes verliehen, ihm aber, den es mit allem, was einem Prinzen nottut, ausgerüstet, gleichsam zum Hohn eine dunkle Geburt und einen gewöhnlichen Lebensweg verliehen habe. Er stellte Vergleichungen zwischen sich und dem Prinzen an. Er mußte sich gestehen, es sei jener ein Mann von sehr vorteilhafter Gesichtsbildung; schöne, lebhafte Augen, eine kühngebogene Nase, ein sanftes, zuvorkommendes Benehmen, kurz, so viele Vorzüge des Äußeren, die jemand empfehlen können, waren jenem eigen. Aber so viele Vorzüge er auch an seinem Begleiter fand, so gestand er sich doch bei diesen Beobachtungen, daß ein Labakan dem fürstlichen Vater wohl noch willkommener sein dürfte als der wirkliche Prinz.
Diese Betrachtungen verfolgten Labakan den ganzen Tag, mit ihnen schlief er im nächsten Nachtlager ein, aber als er morgens aufwachte und sein Blick auf den neben ihm schlafenden Omar fiel, der so ruhig schlafen und von seinem gewissen Glück träumen konnte, da erwachte in ihm der Gedanke, sich durch List oder Gewalt zu erstreben, was ihm das ungünstige Schicksal versagt hatte. Der Dolch, das Erkennungszeichen des heimkehrenden Prinzen, sah aus dem Gürtel des Schlafenden hervor, leise zog er ihn hervor, um ihn in die Brust des Eigentümers zu stoßen. Doch vor dem Gedanken des Mordes entsetzte sich die friedfertige Seele des Gesellen; er begnügte sich, den Dolch zu sich zu stecken, das schnellere Pferd des Prinzen für sich aufzäumen zu lassen, und ehe Omar aufwachte und sich aller seiner Hoffnungen beraubt sah, hatte sein treuloser Gefährte schon einen Vorsprung von mehreren Meilen.
Es war gerade der erste Tag des heiligen Monats Ramadan, an welchem Labakan den Raub an dem Prinzen begangen hatte, und er hatte also noch vier Tage, um zu der Säule El Serujah, welche ihm wohlbekannt war, zu gelangen. Obgleich die Gegend, worin sich diese Säule befand, höchstens noch zwei Tagreisen entfernt sein konnte, so beeilte er sich doch hinzukommen, weil er immer fürchtete, von dem wahren Prinzen eingeholt zu werden.
Am Ende des zweiten Tages erblickte Labakan die Säule El-Serujah. Sie stand auf einer kleinen Anhöhe in einer weiten Ebene und konnte auf zwei bis drei Stunden gesehen werden. Labakans Herz pochte lauter bei diesem Anblick; obgleich er die letzten zwei Tage hindurch Zeit genug gehabt, über die Rolle, die er zu spielen hatte, nachzudenken, so machte ihn doch das böse Gewissen etwas ängstlich, aber der Gedanke, daß er zum Prinzen geboren sei, stärkte ihn wieder, so daß er getrösteter seinem Ziele entgegenging.
Die Gegend um die Säule El-Serujah war unbewohnt und öde, und der neue Prinz wäre wegen seines Unterhalts etwas in Verlegenheit gekommen, wenn er sich nicht auf mehrere Tage versehen hätte. Er lagerte sich also neben seinem Pferd unter einigen Palmen und erwartete dort sein ferneres Schicksal.
Gegen die Mitte des anderen Tages sah er einen großen Zug von Pferden und Kamelen über die Ebene her auf die Säule El-Serujah zuziehen. Der Zug hielt am Fuße des Hügels, auf welchem die Säule stand, man schlug prächtige Zelte auf, und das Ganze sah aus wie der Reisezug eines reichen Bassa oder Scheik. Labakan ahnte, daß die vielen Leute, welche er sah, sich seinetwegen hierher bemüht hatten, und hätte ihnen gerne schon heute ihren künftigen Gebieter gezeigt; aber er mäßigte seine Begierde, als Prinz aufzutreten, da ja doch der nächste Morgen seine kühnsten Wünsche vollkommen befriedigen mußte.
Die Morgensonne weckte den überglücklichen Schneider zu dem wichtigsten Augenblick seines Lebens, welcher ihn aus einem niederen, unbekannten Sterblichen an die Seite eines fürstlichen Vaters erheben sollte; zwar fiel ihm, als er sein Pferd aufzäumte, um zu der Säule hinzureiten, wohl auch das Unrechtmäßige seines Schrittes ein; zwar führten ihm seine Gedanken den Schmerz des in seinen schönen Hoffnungen betrogenen Fürstensohnes vor, aber—der Würfel war geworfen, er konnte nicht mehr ungeschehen machen, was geschehen war, und seine Eigenliebe flüsterte ihm zu, daß er stattlich genug aussehe, um dem mächtigsten König sich als Sohn vorzustellen; ermutigt durch diesen Gedanken, schwang er sich auf sein Roß, nahm alle seine Tapferkeit zusammen, um es in einen ordentlichen Galopp zu bringen, und in weniger als einer Viertelstunde war er am Fuße des Hügels angelangt. Er stieg ab von seinem Pferd und band es an eine Staude, deren mehrere an dem Hügel wuchsen; hierauf zog er den Dolch des Prinzen Omar hervor und stieg den Hügel hinan. Am Fuß der Säule standen sechs Männer um einen Greis von hohem, königlichem Ansehen; ein prachtvoller Kaftan von Goldstoff, mit einem weißen Kaschmirschal umgürtet, der weiße, mit blitzenden Edelsteinen geschmückte Turban bezeichneten ihn als einen Mann von Reichtum und Würde.
Auf ihn ging Labakan zu, neigte sich tief vor ihm und sprach, indem er den Dolch darreichte: „Hier bin ich, den Ihr suchet. „
„Gelobt sei der Prophet, der dich erhielt!“ antwortete der Greis mit Freudentränen. „Umarme deinen alten Vater, mein geliebter Sohn Omar!“ Der gute Schneider war sehr gerührt durch diese feierlichen Worte und sank mit einem Gemisch von Freude und Scham in die Arme des alten Fürsten.
Aber nur einen Augenblick sollte er ungetrübt die Wonne seines neuen Standes genießen; als er sich aus den Armen des fürstlichen Greises aufrichtete, sah er einen Reiter über die Ebene her auf den Hügel zueilen. Der Reiter und sein Roß gewährten einen sonderbaren Anblick; das Roß schien aus Eigensinn oder Müdigkeit nicht vorwärts zu wollen, in einem stolpernden Gang, der weder Schritt noch Trab war, zog es daher, der Reiter aber trieb es mit Händen und Füßen zu schnellerem Laufe an. Nur zu bald erkannte Labakan sein Roß Murva und den echten Prinzen Omar, aber der böse Geist der Lüge war einmal in ihn gefahren, und er beschloß, wie es auch kommen möge, mit eiserner Stirne seine angemaßten Rechte zu behaupten.
Schon aus der Ferne hatte man den Reiter winken gesehen; jetzt war er trotz des schlechten Trabes des Rosses Murva am Fuße des Hügels angekommen, warf sich vom Pferd und stürzte den Hügel hinan. „Haltet ein!“ rief er. „Wer ihr auch sein möget, haltet ein und laßt euch nicht von dem schändlichsten Betrüger täuschen; ich heiße Omar, und kein Sterblicher wage es, meinen Namen zu mißbrauchen!“
Auf den Gesichtern der Umstehenden malte sich tiefes Erstaunen über diese Wendung der Dinge; besonders schien der Greis sehr betroffen, indem er bald den einen, bald den anderen fragend ansah; Labakan aber sprach mit mühsam errungener Ruhe: „Gnädigster Herr und Vater, laßt Euch nicht irremachen durch diesen Menschen da! Es ist, soviel ich weiß, ein wahnsinniger Schneidergeselle aus Alessandria, Labakan geheißen, der mehr unser Mitleid als unseren Zorn verdient.“
Bis zur Raserei aber brachten diese Worte den Prinzen; schäumend vor Wut wollte er auf Labakan eindringen, aber die Umstehenden warfen sich dazwischen und hielten ihn fest, und der Fürst sprach: „Wahrhaftig, mein lieber Sohn, der arme Mensch ist verrückt; man binde ihn und setze ihn auf eines unserer Dromedare, vielleicht, daß wir dem Unglücklichen Hilfe schaffen können.“
Die Wut des Prinzen hatte sich gelegt, weinend rief er dem Fürsten zu: „Mein Herz sagt mir, daß Ihr mein Vater seid; bei dem Andenken meiner Mutter beschwöre ich Euch, hört mich an!“
„Ei, Gott bewahre uns!“ antwortete dieser, „er fängt schon wieder an, irre zu reden, wie doch der Mensch auf so tolle Gedanken kommen kann!“ Damit ergriff er Labakans Arm und ließ sich von ihm den Hügel hinuntergeleiten; sie setzten sich beide auf schöne, mit reichen Decken behängte Pferde und ritten an der Spitze des Zuges über die Ebene hin. Dem unglücklichen Prinzen aber fesselte man die Hände und band ihn auf einem Dromedar fest, und zwei Reiter waren ihm immer zur Seite, die ein wachsames Auge auf jede seiner Bewegungen hatten.
Der fürstliche Greis war Saaud, der Sultan der Wechabiten. Er hatte lange ohne Kinder gelebt, endlich wurde ihm ein Prinz geboren, nach dem er sich so lange gesehnt hatte; aber die Sterndeuter, welche er um die Vorbedeutungen des Knaben befragte, taten den Ausspruch, „daß er bis ins zweiundzwanzigste Jahr in Gefahr stehe, von einem Feinde verdrängt zu werden“, deswegen, um recht sicherzugehen, hatte der Sultan den Prinzen seinem alten, erprobten Freunde Elfi-Bey zum Erziehen gegeben und zweiundzwanzig schmerzliche Jahre auf seinen Anblick geharrt.
Dieses hatte der Sultan seinem (vermeintlichen) Sohne erzählt und sich ihm außerordentlich zufrieden mit seiner Gestalt und seinem würdevollen Benehmen gezeigt.
Als sie in das Land des Sultans kamen, wurden sie überall von den Einwohnern mit Freudengeschrei empfangen; denn das Gerücht von der Ankunft des Prinzen hatte sich wie ein Lauffeuer durch alle Städte und Dörfer verbreitet. Auf den Straßen, durch welche sie zogen, waren Bögen von Blumen und Zweigen errichtet, glänzende Teppiche von allen Farben schmeckten die Häuser, und das Volk pries laut Gott und seinen Propheten, der ihnen einen so schönen Prinzen gesandt habe. Alles dies erfüllte das stolze Herz des Schneiders mit Wonne; desto unglücklicher mußte sich aber der echte Omar fühlen, der, noch immer gefesselt, in stiller Verzweiflung dem Zuge folgte. Niemand kümmerte sich um ihn bei dem allgemeinen Jubel, der doch ihm galt; den Namen Omar riefen tausend und wieder tausend Stimmen, aber ihn, der diesen Namen mit Recht trug, ihn beachtete keiner; höchstens fragte einer oder der andere, wen man denn so fest gebunden mit fortfahre, und schrecklich tönte in das Ohr des Prinzen die Antwort seiner Begleiter, es sei ein wahnsinniger Schneider.
Der Zug war endlich in die Hauptstadt des Sultans gekommen, wo alles noch glänzender zu ihrem Empfang bereitet war als in den übrigen Städten. Die Sultanin, eine ältliche, ehrwürdige Frau, erwartete sie mit ihrem ganzen Hofstaat in dem prachtvollsten Saal des Schlosses. Der Boden dieses Saales war mit einem ungeheuren Teppich bedeckt, die Wände waren mit hellblauem Tuch geschmeckt, das in goldenen Quasten und Schnüren an großen, silbernen Haken hing.
Es war schon dunkel, als der Zug anlangte, daher waren im Saale viele kugelrunde, farbige Lampen angezündet, welche die Nacht zum Tag erhellten. Am klarsten und vielfarbigsten strahlten sie aber im Hintergrund des Saales, wo die Sultanin auf einem Throne saß. Der Thron stand auf vier Stufen und war von lauterem Golde und mit großen Amethysten ausgelegt. Die vier vornehmsten Emire hielten einen Baldachin von roter Seide über dem Haupte der Sultanin, und der Scheik von Medina fächelte ihr mit einer Windfuchtel von weißen Pfauenfedern Kühlung zu.
So erwartete die Sultanin ihren Gemahl und ihren Sohn, auch sie hatte ihn seit seiner Geburt nicht mehr gesehen, aber bedeutsam Träume hatten ihr den Ersehnten gezeigt, daß sie ihn aus Tausenden erkennen wollte. Jetzt hörte man das Geräusch des nahenden Zuges, Trompeten und Trommeln mischten sich in das Zujauchzen der Menge, der Hufschlag der Rosse tönte im Hof des Palastes, näher und näher rauschten die Tritte der Kommenden, die Türen des Saales flogen auf, und durch die Reihen der niederfallenden Diener eilte der Sultan an der Hand seines Sohnes vor den Thron der Mutter.
„Hier“, sprach er, „bringe ich dir den, nach welchem du dich so lange gesehnet.“
Die Sultanin aber fiel ihm in die Rede: „Das ist mein Sohn nicht!“ rief sie aus, „das sind nicht die Züge, die mir der Prophet im Traume gezeigt hat!“
Gerade, als ihr der Sultan ihren Aberglauben verweisen wollte, sprang die Türe des Saales auf. Prinz Omar stürzte herein, verfolgt von seinen Wächtern, denen er sich mit Anstrengung aller seiner Kraft entrissen hatte, er warf sich atemlos vor dem Throne nieder: „Hier will ich sterben, laßt mich töten, grausamer Vater; denn diese Schmach dulde ich nicht länger!“
Alles war bestürzt über diese Reden; man drängte sich um den Unglücklichen her, und schon wollten ihn die herbeieilenden Wachen ergreifen und ihm wieder seine Bande anlegen, als die Sultanin, die in sprachlosem Erstaunen dieses alles mit angesehen hatte, von dem Throne aufsprang. „Haltet ein!“ rief sie, „dieser und kein anderer ist der Rechte, dieser ist’s, den meine Augen nie gesehen und den mein Herz doch gekannt hat!“
Die Wächter hatten unwillkürlich von Omar abgelassen, aber der Sultan, entflammt von wütendem Zorn, rief ihnen zu, den Wahnsinnigen zu binden: „Ich habe hier zu entscheiden“, sprach er mit gebietender Stimme, „und hier richtet man nicht nach den Träumen der Weiber, sondern nach gewissen, untrüglichen Zeichen. Dieser hier (indem er auf Labakan zeigte) ist mein Sohn; denn er hat mir das Wahrzeichen meines Freundes Elfi, den Dolch, gebracht.“
„Gestohlen hat er ihn“, schrie Omar, „mein argloses Vertrauen hat er zum Verrat mißbraucht!“ Der Sultan aber hörte nicht auf die Stimme seines Sohnes; denn er war in allen Dingen gewohnt, eigensinnig nur seinem Urteil zu folgen; daher ließ er den unglücklichen Omar mit Gewalt aus dem Saal schleppen. Er selbst aber begab sich mit Labakan in sein Gemach, voll Wut über die Sultanin, seine Gemahlin, mit der er doch seit fünfundzwanzig Jahren in Frieden gelebt hatte.
Die Sultanin aber war voll Kummer über diese Begebenheiten; sie war vollkommen überzeugt, daß ein Betrüger sich des Herzens des Sultans bemächtigt hatte, denn jenen Unglücklichen hatten ihr so viele bedeutsam Träume als ihren Sohn gezeigt.
Als sich ihr Schmerz ein wenig gelegt hatte, sann sie auf Mittel, um ihren Gemahl von seinem Unrecht zu überzeugen. Es war dies allerdings schwierig; denn jener, der sich für ihren Sohn ausgab, hatte das Erkennungszeichen, den Dolch, überreicht und hatte auch, wie sie erfuhr, so viel von Omars früherem Leben von diesem selbst sich erzählen lassen, daß er seine Rolle, ohne sich zu verraten, spielte.
Sie berief die Männer zu sich, die den Sultan zu der Säule El-Serujah begleitet hatten, um sich alles genau erzählen zu lassen, und hielt dann mit ihren vertrautesten Sklavinnen Rat. Sie wählten und verwarfen dies und jenes Mittel; endlich sprach Melechsalah, eine alte, kluge Zierkassierin: „Wenn ich recht gehört habe, verehrte Gebieterin, so nannte der Überbringer des Dolches den, welchen du für deinen Sohn hältst, Labakan, einen verwirrten Schneider?“
„Ja, so ist es“, antwortete die Sultanin, „aber was willst du damit?“
„Was meint Ihr“, fuhr jene fort, „wenn dieser Betrüger Eurem Sohn seinen eigenen Namen aufgeheftet hätte?—Und wenn dies ist, so gibt es ein herrliches Mittel, den Betrüger zu fangen, das ich Euch ganz im geheimen sagen will.“ Die Sultanin bot ihrer Sklavin das Ohr, und diese flüsterte ihr einen Rat zu, der ihr zu behagen schien, denn sie schickte sich an, sogleich zum Sultan zu gehen.
Die Sultanin war eine kluge Frau, welche wohl die schwachen Seiten des Sultans kannte und sie zu benützen verstand. Sie schien daher, ihm nachgeben und den Sohn anerkennen zu wollen, und bat sich nur eine Bedingung aus; der Sultan, dem sein Aufbrausen gegen seine Frau leid tat, gestand die Bedingung zu, und sie sprach: „Ich möchte gerne den beiden eine Probe ihrer Geschicklichkeit auferlegen; eine andere würde sie vielleicht reiten, fechten oder Speere werfen lassen, aber das sind Sachen, die ein jeder kann; nein, ich will ihnen etwas geben, wozu Scharfsinn gehört! Es soll nämlich jeder von ihnen einen Kaftan und ein Paar Beinkleider verfertigen, und da wollen wir einmal sehen, wer die schönsten macht.“
Der Sultan lachte und sprach: „Ei, da hast du ja etwas recht Kluges ausgesonnen. Mein Sohn sollte mit deinem wahnsinnigen Schneider wetteifern, wer den besten Kaftan macht? Nein, das ist nichts.“
Die Sultanin aber berief sich darauf, daß er ihr die Bedingung zum Voraus zugesagt habe, und der Sultan, welcher ein Mann von Wort war, gab endlich nach, obgleich er schwor, wenn der wahnsinnige Schneider seinen Kaftan auch noch so schön mache, könne er ihn doch nicht für seinen Sohn erkennen.
Der Sultan ging selbst zu seinem Sohn und bat ihn, sich in die Grillen seiner Mutter zu schicken, die nun einmal durchaus einen Kaftan von seiner Hand zu sehen wünsche. Dem guten Labakan lachte das Herz vor Freude; wenn es nur an dem fehlt, dachte er bei sich, da soll die Frau Sultanin bald Freude an mir erleben.
Man hatte zwei Zimmer eingerichtet, eines für den Prinzen, das andere für den Schneider; dort sollten sie ihre Kunst erproben, und man hatte jedem nur ein hinlängliches Stück Seidenzeug, Schere, Nadel und Faden gegeben.
Der Sultan war sehr begierig, was für ein Ding von Kaftan wohl sein Sohn zutage fördern werde, aber auch der Sultanin pochte unruhig das Herz, ob ihre List wohl gelingen werde oder nicht. Man hatte den beiden zwei Tage zu ihrem Geschäft ausgesetzt, am dritten ließ der Sultan seine Gemahlin rufen, und als sie erschienen war, schickte er in jene zwei Zimmer, um die beiden Kaftane und ihre Verfertiger holen zu lassen. Triumphierend trat Labakan ein und breitete seinen Kaftan vor den erstaunten Blicken des Sultans aus. „Siehe her, Vater“, sprach er, „siehe her, verehrte Mutter, ob dies nicht ein Meisterstück von einem Kaftan ist? Da laß ich es mit dem geschicktesten Hofschneider auf eine Wette ankommen, ob er einen solchen herausbringt.“
Die Sultanin lächelte und wandte sich zu Omar: „Und was hast du herausgebracht, mein Sohn?“
Unwillig warf dieser den Seidenstoff und die Schere auf den Boden: „Man hat mich gelehrt, ein Roß zu bändigen und einen Säbel zu schwingen, und meine Lanze trifft auf sechzig Gänge ihr Ziel—aber die Künste der Nadel sind mir fremd, sie wären auch unwürdig für einen Zögling Elfi Beys, des Beherrschers von Kairo.“
„Oh, du echter Sohn meines Herrn“, rief die Sultanin, „ach, daß ich dich umarmen, dich Sohn nennen dürfte! Verzeihet, mein Gemahl und Gebieter“, sprach sie dann, indem sie sich zum Sultan wandte, „daß ich diese List gegen Euch gebraucht habe; sehet Ihr jetzt noch nicht ein, wer Prinz und wer Schneider ist; fürwahr, der Kaftan ist köstlich, den Euer Herr Sohn gemacht hat, und ich möchte ihn gerne fragen, bei welchem Meister er gelernt habe.“
Der Sultan saß in tiefen Gedanken, mißtrauisch bald seine Frau, bald Labakan anschauend, der umsonst sein Erröten und seine Bestürzung, daß er sich so dumm verraten habe, zu bekämpfen suchte. „Auch dieser Beweis genügt nicht“, sprach er, „aber ich weiß, Allah sei es gedankt, ein Mittel, zu erfahren, ob ich betrogen bin oder nicht.“
Er befahl, sein schnellstes Pferd vorzufahren, schwang sich auf und ritt in einen Wald, der nicht weit von der Stadt begann. Dort wohnte nach einer alten Sage eine gütige Fee, Adolzaide geheißen, welche oft schon den Königen seines Stammes in der Stunde der Not mit ihrem Rat beigestanden war; dorthin eilte der Sultan.
In der Mitte des Waldes war ein freier Platz, von hohen Zedern umgeben. Dort wohnte nach der Sage die Fee, und selten betrat ein Sterblicher diesen Platz, denn eine gewisse Scheu davor hatte sich aus alten Zeiten vom Vater auf den Sohn vererbt.
Als der Sultan dort angekommen war, stieg er ab, band sein Pferd an einen Baum, stellte sich in die Mitte des Platzes und sprach mit lauter Stimme: „Wenn es wahr ist, daß du meinen Vätern gütigen Rat erteiltest in der Stunde der Not, so verschmähe nicht die Bitte ihres Enkels und rate mir, wo menschlicher Verstand zu kurzsichtig ist!“
Er hatte kaum die letzten Worte gesprochen, als sich eine der Zedern öffnete und eine verschleierte Frau in langen, weißen Gewändern hervortrat. „Ich weiß, warum du zu mir kommst, Sultan Saaud, dein Wille ist redlich; darum soll dir auch meine Hilfe werden. Nimm diese zwei Kistchen! Laß jene beiden, welche deine Söhne sein wollen, wählen! Ich weiß, daß der, welcher der echte ist, das rechte nicht verfehlen wird.“ So sprach die Verschleierte und reichte ihm zwei kleine Kistchen von Elfenbein, reich mit Gold und Perlen verziert; auf den Deckeln, die der Sultan vergebens zu öffnen versuchte, standen Inschriften von eingesetzten Diamanten.
Der Sultan besann sich, als er nach Hause ritt, hin und her, was wohl in den Kistchen sein könnte, welche er mit aller Mühe nicht zu öffnen vermochte. Auch die Aufschrift gab ihm kein Licht in der Sache; denn auf dem einen stand: „Ehre und Ruhm“, auf dem anderen: „Glück und Reichtum“. Der Sultan dachte bei sich, da würde auch ihm die Wahl schwer werden unter diesen beiden Dingen, die gleich anziehend, gleich lockend seien.
Als er in seinen Palast zurückgekommen war, ließ er die Sultanin rufen und sagte ihr den Ausspruch der Fee, und eine wunderbare Hoffnung erfüllte sie, daß jener, zu dem ihr Herz sie hinzog, das Kistchen wählen würde, welches seine königliche Abkunft beweisen sollte.
Vor dem Throne des Sultans wurden zwei Tische aufgestellt; auf sie setzte der Sultan mit eigener Hand die beiden Kistchen, bestieg dann den Thron und winkte einem seiner Sklaven, die Pforte des Saales zu öffnen. Eine glänzende Versammlung von Bassas und Emiren des Reiches, die der Sultan berufen hatte, strömte durch die geöffnete Pforte. Sie ließen sich auf prachtvollen Polstern nieder, welche die Wände entlang aufgestellt waren.
Als sie sich alle niedergelassen hatten, winkte der König zum zweitenmal, und Labakan wurde hereingeführt. Mit stolzem Schritte ging er durch den Saal, warf sich vor dem Throne nieder und sprach: „Was befiehlt mein Herr und Vater?“
Der Sultan erhob sich auf seinem Thron und sprach: „Mein Sohn! Es sind Zweifel an der Echtheit deiner Ansprüche auf diesen Namen erhoben worden; eines jener Kistchen enthält die Bestätigung deiner echten Geburt, wähle! Ich zweifle nicht, du wirst das rechte wählen!“
Labakan erhob sich und trat vor die Kistchen, er erwog lange, was er wählen sollte, endlich sprach er: „Verehrter Vater! Was kann es Höheres geben als das Glück, dein Sohn zu sein, was Edleres als den Reichtum deiner Gnade? Ich wähle das Kistchen, das die Aufschrift „Glück und Reichtum“ zeigt.“
„Wir werden nachher erfahren, ob du recht gewählt hast; einstweilen setze dich dort auf das Polster zum Bassa von Medina“, sagte der Sultan und winkte seinen Sklaven.
Omar wurde hereingeführt; sein Blick war düster, seine Miene traurig, und sein Anblick erregte allgemeine Teilnahme unter den Anwesenden. Er warf sich vor dem Throne nieder und fragte nach dem Willen des Sultans.
Der Sultan deutete ihm an, daß er eines der Kistchen zu wählen habe, er stand auf und trat vor den Tisch.
Er las aufmerksam beide Inschriften und sprach: „Die letzten Tage haben mich gelehrt, wie unsicher das Glück, wie vergänglich der Reichtum ist; sie haben mich aber auch gelehrt, daß ein unzerstörbares Gut in der Brust des Tapferen wohnt, die Ehre, und daß der leuchtende Stern des Ruhmes nicht mit dem Glück zugleich vergeht. Und sollte ich einer Krone entsagen, der Würfel liegt—Ehre und Ruhm, ich wähle euch!“
Er setzte seine Hand auf das Kistchen, das er erwählt hatte; aber der Sultan befahl ihm, einzuhalten; er winkte Labakan, gleichfalls vor seinen Tisch zu treten, und auch dieser legte seine Hand auf sein Kistchen.
Der Sultan aber ließ sich ein Becken mit Wasser von dem heiligen Brunnen Zemzem in Mekka bringen, wusch seine Hände zum Gebet, wandte sein Gesicht nach Osten, warf sich nieder und betete: „Gott meiner Väter! Der du seit Jahrhunderten unsern Stamm rein und unverfälscht bewahrtest, gib nicht zu, daß ein Unwürdiger den Namen der Abassiden schände, sei mit deinem Schutze meinem echten Sohne nahe in dieser Stunde der Prüfung!“
Der Sultan erhob sich und bestieg seinen Thron wieder; allgemeine Erwartung fesselte die Anwesenden, man wagte kaum zu atmen, man hätte ein Mäuschen über den Saal gehen hören können, so still und gespannt waren alle, die hintersten machten lange Hälse, um über die vorderen nach den Kistchen sehen zu können. Jetzt sprach der Sultan: „Öffnet die Kistchen“, und diese, die vorher keine Gewalt zu öffnen vermochte, sprangen von selbst auf.
In dem Kistchen, das Omar gewählt hatte, lagen auf einem samtenen Kissen eine kleine goldene Krone und ein Zepter; in Labakans Kistchen—eine große Nadel und ein wenig Zwirn! Der Sultan befahl den beiden, ihre Kistchen vor ihn zu bringen. Er nahm das Krönchen von dem Kissen in seine Hand, und wunderbar war es anzusehen, wie er es nahm, wurde es größer und größer, bis es die Größe einer rechten Krone erreicht hatte. Er setzte die Krone seinem Sohn Omar, der vor ihm kniete, auf das Haupt, küßte ihn auf die Stirne und hieß ihn zu seiner Rechten sich niedersetzen. Zu Labakan aber wandte er sich und sprach: „Es ist ein altes Sprichwort: Der Schuster bleibe bei seinem Leisten! Es scheint, als solltest du bei der Nadel bleiben. Zwar hast du meine Gnade nicht verdient, aber es hat jemand für dich gebeten, dem ich heute nichts abschlagen kann; drum schenke ich dir dein armseliges Leben, aber wenn ich dir guten Rates bin, so beeile dich, daß du aus meinem Lande kommst!“
Beschämt, vernichtet, wie er war, vermochte der arme Schneidergeselle nichts zu erwidern; er warf sich vor dem Prinzen nieder, und Tränen drangen ihm aus den Augen: „Könnt Ihr mir vergeben, Prinz?“ sagte er.
„Treue gegen den Freund, Großmut gegen den Feind ist des Abassiden Stolz“, antwortete der Prinz, indem er ihn aufhob, „gehe hin in Frieden!“
„O du mein echter Sohn!“ rief gerührt der alte Sultan und sank an die Brust des Sohnes; die Emire und Bassa und alle Großen des Reiches standen auf von ihren Sitzen und riefen: „Heil dem neuen Königssohn!“ Und unter dem allgemeinen Jubel schlich sich Labakan, sein Kistchen unter dem Arm, aus dem Saal.
Er ging hinunter in die Ställe des Sultans, zäumte sein Roß Murva auf und ritt zum Tore hinaus, Alessandria zu. Sein ganzes Prinzenleben kam ihm wie ein Traum vor, und nur das prachtvolle Kistchen, reich mit Perlen und Diamanten geschmückt, erinnerte ihn, daß er doch nicht geträumt habe.
Als er endlich wieder nach Alessandria kam, ritt er vor das Haus seines alten Meisters, stieg ab, band sein Rößlein an die Türe und trat in die Werkstatt. Der Meister, der ihn nicht gleich kannte, machte ein großes Wesen und fragte, was ihm zu Dienst stehe; als er aber den Gast näher ansah und seinen alten Labakan erkannte, rief er seine Gesellen und Lehrlinge herbei, und alle stürzten sich wie wütend auf den armen Labakan, der keines solchen Empfangs gewärtig war, stießen und schlugen ihn mit Bügeleisen und Ellenmaß, stachen ihn mit Nadeln und zwickten ihn mit scharfen Scheren, bis er erschöpft auf einen Haufen alter Kleider niedersank.
Als er nun so dalag, hielt ihm der Meister eine Strafrede über das gestohlene Kleid; vergebens versicherte Labakan, daß er nur deswegen wiedergekommen sei, um ihm alles zu ersetzen, vergebens bot er ihm den dreifachen Schadenersatz, der Meister und seine Gesellen fielen wieder über ihn her, schlugen ihn weidlich und warfen ihn zur Türe hinaus; zerschlagen und zerfetzt stieg er auf das Roß Murva und ritt in eine Karawanserei. Dort legte er sein müdes, zerschlagenes Haupt nieder und stellte Betrachtungen an über die Leiden der Erde, über das so oft verkannte Verdienst und über die Nichtigkeit und Flüchtigkeit aller Güter. Er schlief mit dem Entschluß ein, aller Größe zu entsagen und ein ehrsamer Bürger zu werden.
Und den andere Tag gereute ihn sein Entschluß nicht; denn die schweren Hände des Meisters und seiner Gesellen schienen alle Hoheit aus ihm herausgeprügelt zu haben.
Er verkaufte um einen hohen Preis sein Kistchen an einen Juwelenhändler, kaufte sich ein Haus und richtete sich eine Werkstatt zu seinem Gewerbe ein. Als er alles eingerichtet und auch ein Schild mit der Aufschrift Labakan, Kleidermacher vor sein Fenster gehängt hatte, setzte er sich und begann mit jener Nadel und dem Zwirn, die er in dem Kistchen gefunden, den Rock zu flicken, welchen ihm sein Meister so grausam zerfetzt hatte. Er wurde von seinem Geschäft abgerufen, und als er sich wieder an die Arbeit setzen wollte, welch sonderbarer Anblick bot sich ihm dar! Die Nadel nähte emsig fort, ohne von jemand geführt zu werden; sie machte feine, zierliche Stiche, wie sie selbst Labakan in seinen kunstreichsten Augenblicken nicht gemacht hatte!
Wahrlich, auch das geringste Geschenk einer gütigen Fee ist nützlich und von großem Wert! Noch einen andere Wert hatte aber dies Geschenk, nämlich: Das Stückchen Zwirn ging nie aus, die Nadel mochte so fleißig sein, als sie wollte.
Labakan bekam viele Kunden und war bald der berühmteste Schneider weit und breit; er schnitt die Gewänder zu und machte den ersten Stich mit der Nadel daran, und flugs arbeitete diese weiter ohne Unterlaß, bis das Gewand fertig war. Meister Labakan hatte bald die ganze Stadt zu Kunden; denn er arbeitete schön und außerordentlich billig, und nur über eines schüttelten die Leute von Alessandria den Kopf, nämlich: daß er ganz ohne Gesellen und bei verschlossenen Türen arbeitete.
So war der Spruch des Kistchens, Glück und Reichtum verheißend, in Erfüllung gegangen; Glück und Reichtum begleiteten, wenn auch in bescheidenem Maße, die Schritte des guten Schneiders, und wenn er von dem Ruhm des jungen Sultans Omar, der in aller Munde lebte, hörte, wenn er hörte, daß dieser Tapfere der Stolz und die Liebe seines Volkes und der Schrecken seiner Feinde sei, da dachte der ehemalige Prinz bei sich: „Es ist doch besser, daß ich ein Schneider geblieben bin; denn um die Ehre und den Ruhm ist es eine gar gefährliche Sache.“ So lebte Labakan, zufrieden mit sich, geachtet von seinen Mitbürgern, und wenn die Nadel indes nicht ihre Kraft verloren, so näht sie noch jetzt mit dem ewigen Zwirn der gütigen Fee Adolzaide.
Mit Sonnenaufgang brach die Karawane auf und gelangte bald nach Birket el Had oder dem Pilgrimsbrunnen, von wo es nur noch drei Stunden Weges nach Kairo waren—Man hatte um diese Zeit die Karawane erwartet, und bald hatten die Kaufleute die Freude, ihre Freunde aus Kairo ihnen entgegenkommen zu sehen. Sie zogen in die Stadt durch das Tor Bebel Falch; denn es wird für eine glückliche Vorbedeutung gehalten, wenn man von Mekka kommt, durch dieses Tor einzuziehen, weil der Prophet hindurchgezogen ist.
Auf dem Markt verabschiedeten sich die vier türkischen Kaufleute von dem Fremden und dem griechischen Kaufmann Zaleukos und gingen mit ihren Freunden nach Haus. Zaleukos aber zeigte dem Fremden eine gute Karawanserei und lud ihn ein, mit ihm das Mittagsmahl zu nehmen. Der Fremde sagte zu und versprach, wenn er nur vorher sich umgekleidet habe, zu erscheinen.
Der Grieche hatte alle Anstalten getroffen, den Fremden, welchen er auf der Reise liebgewonnen hatte, gut zu bewirten, und als die Speisen und Getränke in gehöriger Ordnung aufgestellt waren, setzte er sich, seinen Gast zu erwarten.
Langsam und schweren Schrittes hörte er ihn den Gang, der zu seinem Gemach führte, heraufkommen. Er erhob sich, um ihm freundlich entgegenzusehen und ihn an der Schwelle zu bewillkommnen; aber voll Entsetzen fuhr er zurück, als er die Türe öffnete; denn jener schreckliche Rotmantel trat ihm entgegen; er warf noch einen Blick auf ihn, es war keine Täuschung; dieselbe hohe, gebietende Gestalt, die Larve, aus welcher ihn die dunklen Augen anblitzten, der rote Mantel mit der goldenen Stickerei waren ihm nur allzuwohl bekannt aus den schrecklichsten Stunden seines Lebens.
Widerstreitende Gefühle wogten in Zaleukos Brust; er hatte sich mit diesem Bild seiner Erinnerung längst ausgesöhnt und ihm vergeben, und doch riß sein Anblick alle seine Wunden wieder auf; alle jene qualvollen Stunden der Todesangst, jener Gram, der die Blüte seines Lebens vergiftete, zogen im Flug eines Augenblicks an seiner Seele vorüber.
„Was willst du, Schrecklicher?“ rief der Grieche aus, als die Erscheinung noch immer regungslos auf der Schwelle stand. „Weiche schnell von hinnen, daß ich dir nicht fluche!“
„Zaleukos!“ sprach eine bekannte Stimme unter der Larve hervor. „Zaleukos! So empfängst du deinen Gastfreund?“ Der Sprechende nahm die Larve ab, schlug den Mantel zurück; es war Selim Baruch, der Fremde.
Aber Zaleukos schien noch nicht beruhigt, ihm graute vor dem Fremden; denn nur zu deutlich hatte er in ihm den Unbekannten von der Ponte vecchio erkannt; aber die alte Gewohnheit der Gastfreundschaft siegte; er winkte schweigend dem Fremden, sich zu ihm ans Mahl zu setzen.
„Ich errate deine Gedanken“, nahm dieser das Wort, als sie sich gesetzt hatten. „Deine Augen sehen fragend auf mich—ich hätte schweigen und mich deinen Blicken nie mehr zeigen können, aber ich bin dir Rechenschaft schuldig, und darum wagte ich es auch, auf die Gefahr hin, daß du mir fluchtest, vor dir in meiner alten Gestalt zu erscheinen. Du sagtest einst zu mir: Der Glaube meiner Väter befiehlt mir, ihn zu lieben, auch ist er wohl unglücklicher als ich; glaube dieses, mein Freund, und höre meine Rechtfertigung!
Ich muß weit ausholen, um mich dir ganz verständlich zu machen. Ich bin in Alessandria von christlichen Eltern geboren. Mein Vater, der jüngere Sohn eines alten, berühmten französischen Hauses, war Konsul seines Landes in Alessandria. Ich wurde von meinem zehnten Jahre an in Frankreich bei einem Bruder meiner Mutter erzogen und verließ erst einige Jahre nach dem Ausbruch der Revolution mein Vaterland, um mit meinem Oheim, der in dem Lande seiner Ahnen nicht mehr sicher war, über dem Meer bei meinen Eltern eine Zuflucht zu suchen. Voll Hoffnung, die Ruhe und den Frieden, den uns das empörte Volk der Franzosen entrissen, im elterlichen Hause wiederzufinden, landeten wir. Aber ach! Ich fand nicht alles in meines Vaters Hause, wie es sein sollte; die äußeren Stürme der bewegten Zeit waren zwar noch nicht bis hierher gelangt, desto unerwarteter hatte das Unglück mein Haus im innersten Herzen heimgesucht. Mein Bruder, ein junger, hoffnungsvoller Mann, erster Sekretär meines Vaters, hatte sich erst seit kurzem mit einem jungen Mädchen, der Tochter eines florentinischen Edelmanns, der in unserer Nachbarschaft wohnte, verheiratet; zwei Tage vor unserer Ankunft war diese auf einmal verschwunden, ohne daß weder unsere Familie noch ihr Vater die geringste Spur von ihr auffinden konnten. Man glaubte endlich, sie habe sich auf einem Spaziergang zu weit gewagt und sei in Räuberhände gefallen. Beinahe tröstlicher wäre dieser Gedanke für meinen armen Bruder gewesen als die Wahrheit, die uns nur bald kund wurde. Die Treulose hatte sich mit einem jungen Neapolitaner, den sie im Hause ihres Vaters kennengelernt hatte, eingeschifft. Mein Bruder, aufs äußerste empört über diesen Schritt, bot alles auf, die Schuldige zur Strafe zu ziehen; doch vergebens; seine Versuche, die in Neapel und Florenz Aufsehen erregt hatten, dienten nur dazu, sein und unser aller Unglück zu vollenden. Der florentinische Edelmann reiste in sein Vaterland zurück, zwar mit dem Vorgeben, meinem Bruder Recht zu verschaffen, der Tat nach aber, um uns zu verderben. Er schlug in Florenz alle jene Untersuchungen, welche mein Bruder angeknüpft hatte, nieder und wußte seinen Einfluß, den er auf alle Art sich verschafft hatte, so gut zu benützen, daß mein Vater und mein Bruder ihrer Regierung verdächtig gemacht und durch die schändlichsten Mittel gefangen, nach Frankreich geführt und dort vom Beil des Henkers getötet wurden. Meine arme Mutter verfiel in Wahnsinn, und erst nach zehn langen Monaten erlöste sie der Tod von ihrem schrecklichen Zustand, der aber in den letzten Tagen zu vollem, klarem Bewußtsein geworden war. So stand ich jetzt ganz allein in der Welt, aber nur ein Gedanke beschäftigte meine Seele, nur ein Gedanke ließ mich meine Trauer vergessen, es war jene mächtige Flamme, die meine Mutter in ihrer letzten Stunde in mir angefacht hatte.
In den letzten Stunden war, wie ich dir sagte, ihr Bewußtsein zurückgekehrt; sie ließ mich rufen und sprach mit Ruhe von unserem Schicksal und ihrem Ende. Dann aber ließ sie alle aus dem Zimmer gehen, richtete sich mit feierlicher Miene von ihrem ärmlichen Lager auf und sagte, ich könne mir ihren Segen erwerben, wenn ich ihr schwöre, etwas auszufahren, das sie mir auftragen würde—Ergriffen von den Worten der sterbenden Mutter, gelobte ich mit einem Eide zu tun, wie sie mir sagen werde. Sie brach nun in Verwünschungen gegen den Florentiner und seine Tochter aus und legte mir mit den fürchterlichsten Drohungen ihres Fluches auf, mein unglückliches Haus an ihm zu rächen. Sie starb in meinen Armen. Jener Gedanke der Rache hatte schon lange in meiner Seele geschlummert; jetzt erwachte er mit aller Macht. Ich sammelte den Rest meines väterlichen Vermögens und schwor mir, alles an meine Rache zu setzen oder selbst mit unterzugehen.
Bald war ich in Florenz, wo ich mich so geheim als möglich aufhielt; mein Plan war um vieles erschwert worden durch die Lage, in welcher sich meine Feinde befanden. Der alte Florentiner war Gouverneur geworden und hatte so alle Mittel in der Hand, sobald er das geringste ahnte, mich zu verderben. Ein Zufall kam mir zu Hilfe. Eines Abends sah ich einen Menschen in bekannter Livree durch die Straßen gehen; sein unsicherer Gang, sein finsterer Blick und das halblaut herausgestoßene „Santo sacramento“, „Maledetto diavolo“ ließen mich den alten Pietro, einen Diener des Florentiners, den ich schon in Alessandria gekannt hatte, erkennen. Ich war nicht in Zweifel, daß er über seinen Herrn in Zorn geraten sei, und beschloß, seine Stimmung zu benützen. Er schien sehr überrascht, mich hier zu sehen, klagte mir sein Leiden, daß er seinem Herrn, seit er Gouverneur geworden, nichts mehr recht machen könne, und mein Gold, unterstützt von seinem Zorn, brachte ihn bald auf meine Seite. Das Schwierigste war jetzt beseitigt; ich hatte einen Mann in meinem Solde, der mir zu jeder Stunde die Türe meines Feindes öffnete, und nun reifte mein Racheplan immer schneller heran. Das Leben des alten Florentiners schien mir ein zu geringes Gewicht, dem Untergang meines Hauses gegenüber, zu haben. Sein Liebstes mußte er gemordet sehen, und dies war Bianka, seine Tochter. Hatte ja sie so schändlich an meinem Bruder gefrevelt, war ja doch sie die Ursache unseres Unglücks. Gar erwünscht kam sogar meinem rachedürstigen Herzen die Nachricht, daß in dieser Zeit Bianka zum zweitenmal sich vermählen wollte, es war beschlossen, sie mußte sterben. Aber mir selbst graute vor der Tat, und auch Pietro traute sich zu wenig Kraft zu; darum spähten wir umher nach einem Mann, der das Geschäft vollbringen könne. Unter den Florentinern wagte ich keinen zu dingen, denn gegen den Gouverneur würde keiner etwas Solches unternommen haben. Da fiel Pietro der Plan ein, den ich nachher ausgeführt habe; zugleich schlug er dich als Fremden und Arzt als den Tauglichsten vor. Den Verlauf der Sache weißt du. Nur an deiner großen Vorsicht und Ehrlichkeit schien mein Unternehmen zu scheitern. Daher der Zufall mit dem Mantel.
Pietro öffnete uns das Pförtchen an dem Palast des Gouverneurs; er hätte uns auch ebenso heimlich wieder hinausgeleitet, wenn wir nicht, durch den schrecklichen Anblick, der sich uns durch die Türspalte darbot, erschreckt, entflohen wären. Von Schrecken und Reue gejagt, war ich über zweihundert Schritte fortgerannt, bis ich auf den Stufen einer Kirche niedersank. Dort erst sammelte ich mich wieder, und mein erster Gedanke warst du und dein schreckliches Schicksal, wenn man dich in dem Hause fände. Ich schlich an den Palast, aber weder von Pietro noch von dir konnte ich eine Spur entdecken; das Pförtchen aber war offen, so konnte ich wenigstens hoffen, daß du die Gelegenheit zur Flucht benützt haben könntest.
Als aber der Tag anbrach, ließ mich die Angst vor der Entdeckung und ein unabweisbares Gefühl von Reue nicht mehr in den Mauern von Florenz. Ich eilte nach Rom. Aber denke dir meine Bestürzung, als man dort nach einigen Tagen überall diese Geschichte erzählte mit dem Beisatz, man habe den Mörder, einen griechischen Arzt, gefangen. Ich kehrte in banger Besorgnis nach Florenz zurück; denn schien mir meine Rache schon vorher zu stark, so verfluchte ich sie jetzt, denn sie war mir durch dein Leben allzu teuer erkauft. Ich kam an demselben Tage an, der dich der Hand beraubte. Ich schweige von dem, was ich fühlte, als ich dich das Schafott besteigen und so heldenmütig leiden sah. Aber damals, als dein Blut in Strömen aufspritzte, war der Entschluß fest in mir, dir deine übrigen Lebenstage zu versüßen. Was weiter geschehen ist, weißt du, nur das bleibt mir noch zu sagen übrig, warum ich diese Reise mit dir machte.
Als eine schwere Last drückte mich der Gedanke, daß du mir noch immer nicht vergeben habest; darum entschloß ich mich, viele Tage mit dir zu leben und dir endlich Rechenschaft abzulegen von dem, was ich mit dir getan.“
Schweigend hatte der Grieche seinen Gast angehört; mit sanftem Blick bot er ihm, als er geendet hatte, seine Rechte. „Ich wußte wohl, daß du unglücklicher sein müßtest als ich, denn jene grausame Tat wird wie eine dunkle Wolke ewig deine Tage verfinstern; ich vergebe dir von Herzen. Aber erlaube mir noch eine Frage: Wie kommst du unter dieser Gestalt in die Wüste? Was fingst du an, nachdem du in Konstantinopel mir das Haus gekauft hattest?“
„Ich ging nach Alessandria zurück“, antwortete der Gefragte. „Haß gegen alle Menschen tobte in meiner Brust, brennender Haß besonders gegen jene Nationen, die man die gebildeten nennt. Glaube mir, unter meinen Moslemiten war mir wohler! Kaum war ich einige Monate in Alessandria, als jene Landung meiner Landsleute erfolgte.
Ich sah in ihnen nur die Henker meines Vaters und meines Bruders; darum sammelte ich einige gleichgesinnte junge Leute meiner Bekanntschaft und schloß mich jenen tapferen Mamelucken an, die so oft der Schrecken des französischen Heeres wurden. Als der Feldzug beendigt war, konnte ich mich nicht entschließen, zu den Künsten des Friedens zurückzukehren. Ich lebte mit einer kleinen Anzahl gleichdenkender Freunde ein unstetes und flüchtiges, dem Kampf und der Jagd geweihtes Leben; ich lebe zufrieden unter diesen Leuten, die mich wie ihren Fürsten ehren; denn wenn meine Asiaten auch nicht so gebildet sind wie Eure Europäer, so sind sie doch weit entfernt von Neid und Verleumdung, von Selbstsucht und Ehrgeiz.“
Zaleukos dankte dem Fremden für seine Mitteilung, aber er verbarg ihm nicht, daß er es für seinen Stand, für seine Bildung angemessener fände, wenn er in christlichen, in europäischen Ländern leben und wirken würde. Er faßte seine Hand und bat ihn, mit ihm zu ziehen, bei ihm zu leben und zu sterben.
Gerührt sah ihn der Gastfreund an. „Daraus erkenne ich“, sagte er, „daß du mir ganz vergeben hast, daß du mich liebst. Nimm meinen innigsten Dank dafür!“ Er sprang auf und stand in seiner ganzen Größe vor dem Griechen, dem vor dem kriegerischen Anstand, den dunkel blitzenden Augen, der tiefen Stimme seines Gastes beinahe graute. „Dein Vorschlag ist schön“, sprach jener weiter, „er möchte für jeden andern lockend sein—ich kann ihn nicht benützen. Schon steht mein Roß gesattelt, erwarten mich meine Diener; lebe wohl, Zaleukos!“ Die Freunde, die das Schicksal so wunderbar zusammengeführt, umarmten sich zum Abschied. „Und wie nenne ich dich? Wie heißt mein Gastfreund, der auf ewig in meinem Gedächtnis leben wird?“ fragte der Grieche.
Der Fremde sah ihn lange an, drückte ihm noch einmal die Hand und sprach: „Man nennt mich den Herrn der Wüste; ich bin der Räuber Orbasan.“


Caliph Stork and other Fairy Tales

Footnotes

[1the frame story The Caravan was however retranslated especially for this site, as it was only very partially translated in the 1855 New York edition (only 1,100 words out of 5,100).

[2under the title "The Oriental Story Book".

[3Märchen – fairy tale (German).

[4Mutabor – I shall be transformed (Latin).

[5Dragoman – translator and guide.

[6the Sublime Porte – the former Ottoman court or government in Turkey.